Latino CEOs Share Insights On Business Success
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By Robert Reiss

As American companies focus on their growing success, perhaps one of the most powerful and widely accepted ways is for them to continue to expand on their achievements through building more diversity and inclusion efforts, especially at the executive and board levels. It’s not just the right thing to do, but research has proven to be effective in helping to enhance revenue, recruiting, innovation and reputation. However, findings from a recent study by the Alliance for Board Diversity show that in 2016 less than 15% of Fortune 500 board seats were held by minorities.

One of the fastest growing segments in the workplace is the Latino U.S. workforce, which has grown significantly from 10.7 million in 1990 to 26.8 million in 2016 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. However, only 3.5% of Fortune 500 board seats were held by Latinos in 2016. In fact, 2010 data from the Alliance for Board Diversity suggests that these figures represent a meager .5% increase in the representation for Hispanic board members between 2010 and 2016.

As there are currently only 11 Fortune 500 Latino CEOs, I thought it would be of value to gain insights from key Latino executives on building exceptional businesses and on fostering growth of Latino executives. The CEOs interviewed are:

– Pedro J. Pizarro, President and CEO, Edison International

– Geisha Williams, President and CEO, PG&E

– Cid Wilson, President and CEO, Hispanic Association on Corporate Responsibility’s (HACR)

Robert Reiss: What is your philosophy for building an exceptional business in today’s world?

Geisha Williams: One of the biggest keys is creating a workplace where every employee feels comfortable speaking up and where leaders listen and follow up. Organizations that can achieve this transparent, engaging environment are better able to challenge old ways of doing business. They’re able to quickly call out risk areas and find solutions. And they’re better positioned to identify and pursue opportunities to grow and succeed. 

Pedro J. Pizarro: My philosophy for building an exceptional business is simple: Hire, retain and promote exceptional people, and create an environment where every team member feels like an owner. Our team must have a sense of purpose, be free to innovate, and feel energized by our mission. Equally important is fostering a diverse and inclusive workplace. Diversity of backgrounds creates diversity of thought, and I encourage my team at every level to bring that to bear on the issues we face, even when that means disagreeing with me. That give-and-take process yields the insights needed to successfully navigate constant change, and flattens the hierarchies that can hold companies back.

Cid Wilson: My philosophy on building an exceptional institution starts with a compelling purpose-driven mission. Working with our board of directors and a dedicated staff of leaders, we are relentlessly pursuing our mission of advancing Hispanic inclusion in Corporate America. Secondly, you have to master the art of anticipated change. What worked in the past may not work tomorrow. When change is on the horizon, exceptional institutions adapt while others fall behind. Thirdly, having a strong reputation and credibility of being best-in-class in executing your mission will differentiate your institution and stand out from the rest. Lastly, exceptional institutions plan to achieve and dare to exceed so that they see great results and outcomes.  I believe in the time-honored principle that when you “under-promise and over-deliver,” your business or institution will create exceptional value and solidify your external credibility.

Continue onto Forbes to read the complete article.

Former Firefighters Find Great Job Opportunities as Emergency Recovery Coordinators at Top Restoration Company Paul Davis: Meet Ruben Rodriguez
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Ruben Rodriguez headshot

(Jacksonville, FL) Ruben Rodriguez, a former firefighter for both the City of Miami Fire & Rescue and the Tallahassee Fire Department, is currently the Emergency Recovery Coordinator for Paul Davis of Tallahassee.

He also is active in the Business Development end of the company which involves creating and maintaining client relationships. Ruben came aboard the Paul Davis team in January of 2019 and explains how much he enjoys the work.

“For me, this was just a continuation of the work firefighters do, in that we are all about serving others and helping people in their time of need. It feels great to offer some help and solace to someone who is overwhelmed from a disaster,” Ruben shared.

The formal description of Ruben’s job and all ERC’s at Paul Davis is coordinator of who and what is needed for the recovery for people, communities, and businesses after a disaster, particularly fires.

“People often experience numbness, shock, fear and difficulty focusing during these situations and, as with any trauma, they shouldn’t be making important decisions during this period,” explained Ruben. “That’s where we come in. We excel in coordination among all the players; adjustors and insurance carriers, and mitigation workers and gently guide shocked property owners through the stressful process. ERC’s from Paul Davis are trained and have the knowledge needed to protect the point of origin in a fire loss for example. This is important because sometimes insurance companies want to perform an origin and cause investigation. One of my duties would be to make an accurate assessment of what needs to be done to secure the scene. This eliminates a crucial task for the fire victim at that awful time.

Among the rewards Ruben feels in his job is working with civic causes and fire prevention programs, one of which involves the Tallahassee Paul Davis team helping to assist in installations of smoke detectors for the needy.

For National Fire Prevention Week October 4th-10th Paul Davis offers many important tips but Ruben’s top tip is “Candles and Space Heaters…Never leave them unattended!”

About Paul Davis Restoration

For more than 50 years, Paul Davis Restorations Inc. has restored residential and commercial properties damaged by fire, water, mold, storms, and disasters. Paul Davis is a one-stop shop for disaster damage and restoration and has more than 300 independently owned franchises in the United States and Canada. The professionals at Paul Davis are certified in emergency restoration, reconstruction, and remodeling. For more information, visit the company website at www.pauldavis.com

 

The one characteristic that will make you an all-star according to science
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By Amy Stanton

A few years ago, an interesting study came out of Harvard Business Review titled “The Business Case for Curiosity.”

In the study, HBR reported how an increase in employee curiosity led to a dramatic increase in company-wide creativity; how curiosity leads to empathy, which leads to reduced conflict among team members; and how “Google identifies naturally curious people through interview questions such as these: ‘Have you ever found yourself unable to stop learning something you’ve never encountered before? Why? What kept you persistent?’”

And then a few weeks ago, I came across a piece on Medium titled “The 2-Word Trick That Makes Small Talk Interesting.”

What are the two words?

“I’m curious…” before asking a question.

Whether we realize it or not, curiosity is one of the most appealing qualities . . . in a friend, an employee, a boss, or a leader.

Curiosity leads to improved problem-solving—in just about every capacity (logistically, emotionally, financially, etc.).

As the HBR study goes on to explain, “To assess curiosity, employers can also ask candidates about their interests outside of work. Reading books unrelated to one’s own field and exploring questions just for the sake of knowing the answers are indications of curiosity.”

I didn’t realize it at the time, but when I was starting my company, originally focused exclusively on female athletes and women’s sports, a number of people told me, “There’s no money in women’s sports.” And the reason I pressed on regardless was that I was curious. “Is that true? If it is true, why? And shouldn’t we change that?” Those questions and my curiosity started the Stanton & Company journey (thank goodness!).

And then a few years ago, when I decided I wanted to write a book about femininity, I was curious about my behaviors, feelings, and ideas—was I experiencing something unique, or were my feelings and human responses part of a larger societal reality? (The answer turned out to be the latter.)

Continue on to Fast Company to read the complete article.

Meet the Latina CEO who Won’t Stop Exceeding Expectations
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Irma Olgui stands smiling with arms folded

Irma Olguin, the tech CEO of Geekwise Academy, is not your typical CEO. Though she lives in California, where many business owners have taken to big cities, such as Los Angeles and San Francisco, Olguin runs her business in Fresno, California, one of the poorest cities in the United States.

She spends her workdays with pink hair, normally wearing T-shirts and jeans, and depended on recycling cans and bottles to afford the transportation fee to the University of Toledo, where she was the first person in her family to earn her degree.

Through her studies, Olguin found her passion for computer science and engineering, a field that is predominately male. Following her graduation in 2004, Olguin had several opportunities to work various tech jobs near her school but ultimately decided to return to Fresno in an attempt to boost the economy. While working with Fresno school districts in both teaching and performing computer programming work, Olguin teamed up with property lawyer Jake Sobreal in 2012. Both being Fresno natives, Olguin and Sobreal decided it was time to teach the natives of their hometown the skills they would need to boost their economy and to better provide for themselves.

In 2013, Geekwise Academy was born, a crash course learning center for coding, technology, and business skills. The academy has given people with a wide variety of backgrounds the inspiration and tools needed to jump back into the workforce. Graduates of the Geekwise Academy have included military veterans, newly released prisoners, and even make up 25% of Shift3 Technologies’ staff.

With the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic, Olguin decided to defy the expectations of a potential crashing economy and use the situation to her advantage. In March of 2020, Geekwise Academy went digital where the company received double their usual clientele, despite having opened more locations two years before. Despite the pandemic, Olguin and Sobreal are still working toward opening new locations, despite uncertain real estate numbers.

Given their estimated $27 million in capital backing, $20 million in revenue, and her past of consistently defeating the odds, Olguin’s desire to grow her company, stimulate the economy, and help those desiring a better career, are looking positive. Of her company, Olguin says, “We’ve found a fundamentally different way to rebuild American cities, especially at a time when folks are looking around and saying, ‘What do we do with our economy?’ We think we have the answer to that.”

How these Business Owners Are Beating the Odds
LinkedIn
Stock image of a business woman standing outside of a cafe

By Natalie Rodgers

Of the small businesses to suffer the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic, Latinx-owned businesses make up a majority of the impact. According to a survey done by the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative, nearly 86 percent of Latinx businesses owners reported that their business was negatively impacted by COVID-19 in some way. These high percentages are especially interesting considering that Latinx small businesses make up about $500 billion of the economy’s yearly sales.

Many of these businesses depended on relief initiatives, such as the Payroll Protection Program (PPP), to help keep their companies on the ground, but many of them were not able to receive these quickly dissipating funds. Because of this, many Latinx businesspeople have taken to their own methods to help keep their businesses running, their employees paid, and their customers satisfied. In fact, this was precisely the situation for Lucina Gomez, the owner of Café Victoria in Dallas, Texas.

When Gomez noticed that the pandemic was taking away more and more of her customers, her main goal became clear: to keep paying her four employees. Gomez shortened the working days of the café and began to branch her businesses into the world of online order and delivery. Passing out advertising material herself while walking through town, she began
to receive momentum again as the digital orders flooded in, especially orders being bought for first responders of the pandemic. Though Gomez’ business still remains effected by the pandemic, the switch to online ordering has given her enough to keep her store running and her employees paid. In fact, she even increased her payroll for 15 percent to accommodate this new sales facet.

Similarly, Andre Reyes, owner of the Chicago restaurant, Birrieria Ocotlan, began to utilize online resources as the pandemic worsened. Paying close attention to the virus since January, Reyes began preparing for the possibility of a pandemic by stocking up on cleaning supplies and protective gear.

Once Chicago ordered the stay-at-home order, Reyes’ planning was able to effectively prepare his staff to continue business. His employees immediately began showing up to work in hazmat suits, and curbside ordering was implemented immediately.

Additionally, Reyes partnered with Uber Eats implementing an easier option for food delivery services, which proved especially helpful once Birrieria Ocotlan moved to exclusively serving through delivery and pick-up methods. Reyes’ preparedness and partnership with online sources has not only ensured that the restaurant stays in business and that the staff was paid, but also the restaurant’s profits have returned to a pre-pandemic normal.

Online services have not only served food-based industries like Café Victoria but have also proved to be an anchor for gyms. Nathalie Hurtado, the owner of The Queer Gym, is no stranger to running a small business during financial crisis. Hurtado opened her gym in 2008 amid the recession and depended on smart shopping and saving to get her business off the
ground.

Though the only physical location of The Queer Gym exists in Oakland, California, Hurtado had already been offering online courses and classes that contributed to 50 percent of her total income.

Now as many gyms have been ordered to close, especially in California, Hurtado switched to a fully online approach to her business where her staff helps her lead the numerous live workout sessions that occur daily.

Similarly, to Gomez, Hurtado increased her advertising, ensuring that her ads were directly affecting LGBTQ+ audiences across the United States. Since moving to a completely digital platform and doubling up on their advertising, The Queer Gym is not just surviving, but thriving, as they have tripled her cliental and are even considering continuing their purely online platform after the pandemic.

Through the unpredictability of the times, it’s hard to say what the future will hold for businesses, but Andre Reyes put it best when he said, “It’s our duty to educate ourselves on everything that is available to us right now, and there’s nothing bad in undergoing change or emerging from it.”

Changing the Dialogue
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Len's Headshot

Len Necefer, Ph.D, is fearless in his pursuit of change in the Navajo Nation. He is changing the national dialogue around issues facing Indian Country by making sure American Indian voices are heard and engaged.

Necefer carefully chose each step he took as he pursued one degree after another, all so that one day he could do exactly what he does today—find the balance of competing uses of our public lands and natural resources and the interests of Native communities and teach others how to do the same.

Finding his voice was a focus through his entire academic journey, which started at the University of Kansas and was ultimately completed by achieving his doctorate in the Department of Engineering and Public Policy from Carnegie Mellon University.

Frustrated and saddened by the environmental destruction and mismanagement occurring in Indian Country, Necefer decided to dedicate his career to bringing sustainable environmental practices to the Navajo Nation. This work began at the University of Kansas, where he developed his own community recycling program in coordination with the dean, University of Kansas Recycling, and the Coca-Cola Company. In just two years, the program was responsible for diverting more than 9,000 pounds of recyclable materials from landfills.

It was this experience that inspired Necefer to pursue his Ph.D., to further hone his talent for creative problem solving in the environmental sector. Like many Native students, academic attainment is not possible without help. Necefer’s help came from the American Indian College Fund, an organization Necefer continues to work with today in his role as an organization Ambassador. The College Fund’s support was critical in Necefer’s success, as the transition to Carnegie Melon, where he completed his doctorate, was difficult—he was the only Native student among more than 5,000 graduate students. But Necefer did not let his circumstances defeat him, instead he used them as motivation.

Following the completion of his Ph.D., Necefer chose a position with the Office of Indian Energy in the Department of Energy, working with almost 300 tribes to plan and fund more than 40 renewable resource projects for development,

“Helping tribes actualize their vision of what they want their future to be was incredibly fulfilling,” said Necefer, whose initial efforts were directed at finding the most sustainable and cost-effective ways to provide energy to people on reservations.

However, he soon realized that perhaps the most innovative and useful aspect of his project involved determining how to incorporate traditional Native values into environmental planning. He began interviewing tribal members on the Navajo Reservation, and based on their responses, developed an interface that allowed anyone from the tribe to determine the environmental impacts of various methods of energy development, including wind and solar.

Perhaps most importantly, it allowed Navajo people to become engaged with the issues and to have a voice in the decision-making process regarding environmental issues affecting their communities. “It was a really good learning experience for me just to have that engagement with folks,” said Necefer. “I saw a lot of frustration from people. Just being asked gave them hope.”

His next career move was to start his own company, NativesOutdoors. The aim of this company is to develop outdoor gear with indigenous artists and athletes and give a voice to native people in the intersection of the management of public lands and outdoor recreation. While continuing to build his company, Necefer is also an assistant professor at the University of Arizona, College of Behavioral and Social Sciences. This position affords him the opportunity to both teach a new generation of people about the things most important to him—indigenous peoples and environmental issues impacting their communities—as well as engage in public policy.
In his spare time, Necefer is an avid outdoor adventurer using rock/ice climbing, high altitude and ski mountaineering, and bikepacking to convey stories focused on environmental activism and indigenous history. These adventures are documented through his writing and photography, which has been featured in the Alpinist, Outside Magazine, the Climbing Zine, BESIDE Magazine, Patagonia’s the Cleanest Line, and various film festivals.

About Len Necefer

Len Necefer, Ph.D., is an assistant professor at the University of Arizona, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, with joint appointments with the American Indian Studies program & the Udall Center for Public Policy. In addition, he is the founder & CEO of Colorado-based outdoor apparel company NativesOutdoors. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Kansas & a doctorate from Carnegie Mellon University’s Department of Engineering and Public Policy. Previously he worked at the NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio on supersonic vehicle research and most recently worked for the Department of Energy’s Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs supporting tribes realize their energy futures through research and grant making. His research focuses on the intersection of indigenous people and natural resource management policy. This has included work from energy and water issues in the lower 48 and Alaska to outdoor recreation management policy.

Where Are the Hispanic Executives?
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By JD Swerzenski, Donald T. Tomaskovic, and Eric Hoyt

Many organizations have prioritized workplace equality and access to high-paying, executive level jobs for minority groups in recent years.

Several 2020 presidential candidates are putting forward plans to increase minority executive positions by diversifying corporate boards, punishing companies with poor diversity track records and increasing funding for minority-led business institutions.

However, according to our own 2019 analysis, white men still hold the majority of executive positions such as CEOs, management directors and financial officers.

As economic and communication scholars, we looked at Equal Employment Opportunity Commission employment data for executives at large and mid-sized companies. Our analysis shows that white men sit in 65.5 percent of these high-paying boardroom positions while representing only 38 percent of the U.S. workforce.

The dominance of white male executives, however, is by no means evenly distributed across the country. Our report tracks representation among Hispanic executives, city by city.

C-Suite Inequality
The gap between labor force and executive representation is wider among Hispanics than any other group.

Executive jobs offer salary—$155,586 on average—benefits and job security that simply are not available in lower level positions. They also offer the power to drive initiatives, including those focused on diversity.

So where do the Hispanic executives work? Pittsburgh is the only large city in the U.S. to nearly reach equity. Hispanics comprise 1.3 percent of the city’s executive workforce and 1.4 percent of its overall labor market.

That low overall representation is a trend among cities with the best equity.

Four out of five American cities with the most equitable representation—Pittsburgh, Detroit, St. Louis and Cincinnati—have Hispanic populations of less than 4 percent.

These findings fall in line with our earlier research showing that minority representation in executive positions is highest in areas with the lowest minority population.

The final city in the top five, Miami, stands out for its high representation of Hispanic executives at 24.6 percent and high percentage of Hispanics in the overall workforce at 44.1 percent.

Miami is also an anomaly among other large cities with Hispanic work forces such as Houston—43 percent overall labor force and 10.3 percent executive representation—and Los Angeles—34.2 percent labor force and 8 percent executive.

Driving Miami’s high representation is likely the city’s strong economic connections to Central and South America, which favors Hispanic cultural background and Spanish language capability among top executives.
This is especially true with regards to the many media-based companies located in Miami, such as Telemundo, which targets consumers throughout the Spanish-speaking world.

Trends at the Bottom
So how do things look at the other end of the scale?
New York City has the largest Hispanic population in the U.S with 2.3 million individuals. They comprise of 22.6 percent of the city’s total workforce, including 28.7 percent of its service workers and 40 percent of its laborer positions.

But only 4.5 percent of New York’s executives are Hispanic.

New York matters because of the large number of Hispanics who live there and the relative power of its executive positions. In 2019, 73 of the Fortune 500 companies were headquartered in the city, among them Citibank, Verizon, MetLife and many other major firms.

It’s unlikely that there is one key factor behind the lack of Hispanic representation in these jobs. One possibility is an entrenched corporate culture in New York dominated by white male executives. Further, unlike in Miami, Hispanic cultural and linguistic backgrounds are perhaps less valued in these boardrooms.

This, however, shouldn’t eliminate the possibility for change. New York’s trade workers—a group once dominated by white men—now includes 21.3 percent Hispanic workers, one of the highest rates in the country. Efforts to develop Hispanic executive candidates similar to Miami’s youth entrepreneurship program or Pittsburgh’s business incubator program centered in the city’s Hispanic Beechwood neighborhood might lead to greater diversification of New York’s corporate offices.

Rounding out the bottom five are San Jose, Salt Lake City, Hartford and Oklahoma City, all cities with at least 10 percent Hispanic representation in the labor force.

Diversity Matters
Research indicates that boardroom diversity can positively impact both profitability and job satisfaction within companies, particularly by bridging the divide between company executives and lower level employees.
With recent reports showing stagnation in the overall number of Hispanic executives nationwide, it’s particularly important for cities and companies to consider what more can be done to bring more Hispanics into the boardroom.

Cities might bolster Hispanic business participation and entrepreneurship by helping build business incubator programs, supporting Hispanic business development groups and promoting educational opportunities at area universities.

To make change, Hispanic workers need to be employed in positions that feed into to the highest company levels. Currently, 8 percent of all managerial and 6 percent of all professional positions in the U.S. are Hispanic, far below their labor market share of 17 percent.

Overriding these discrepancies means acknowledging cultural blind spots that often exclude Hispanic workers, such as non-Latino employers recognizing unconscious biases in their communication styles and providing opportunities to professionally use Hispanic cultural competencies.

Source: theconversation.com

With An Eye For Design, New Biz Owner Brings #1 Mobile Flooring Franchise To Customers’ Homes
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Emilia Navedo standing in front of her work vehicle

Looking to grow as a professional, Emilia Navedo didn’t waste time taking baby steps to her goal.

Instead, she took one giant leap and is relishing the opportunity. With a wonderful background in design and experience in managing a business already in Mexico City, the 39-year-old Navedo recently opened Floor Coverings International Roseville, California. She visits customers’ homes in a Mobile Flooring Showroom stocked with thousands of flooring samples from top manufacturers. Floor Coverings International Roseville services Roseville, Granite Bay, Rocklin, Loomis, Auburn, Lincoln, Penryn and Newcastle, in California.

Her advice to others wishing to own their own business in a field they love, “Don’t be afraid,” said the Roseville resident. “Trust in yourself. If you dream it, you can do it.”

Navedo’s father was an architect and she credits him for her skills and love of design. She also has a passion for photography. But all of her experiences came full circle when she had the opportunity to study fashion and style in Italy. “Photography allowed me to obtain a certain perspective on details and taste that bled into my work with interior design,” said Navedo. “After I studied in Italy, that ultimately led me to build a children’s furniture franchise and start my career as an interior designer. I’m not really leaving my previous career, but rather expanding because I want to grow as a professional.”

In Floor Coverings International, Navedo – who is being joined by her father in her new venture – found a company that has tripled in size since 2005 by putting a laser focus on consumer buying habits and expressed desires, its impressive operating model, growth ability, marketing, advertising and merchandising. Floor Coverings International further separates itself from the competition through its customer experience, made up of several simple and integrated steps that exceed customers’ expectations. “I chose Floor Coverings International because during my research I learned what a great company it is in so many aspects,” Navedo said. “They are like a big family. They give amazing support, know how to build leaders and provide the best quality products to our customers.

ABOUT FLOOR COVERINGS INTERNATIONAL

Floor Coverings International is the #1 Mobile Flooring Franchise in North America. Utilizing a unique in-home experience, the mobile showroom comes directly to the customer’s door with more than 3,000 flooring choices. Floor Coverings International has 150-plus locations throughout the U.S. and Canada with plenty of opportunity for continued expansion in 2020. For franchise information, please visit www.flooring-franchise.com and to find your closest location, www.floorcoveringsinternational.com.

5 Tips for Business Survival During the Pandemic
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As CEOs and executives struggle to deal with the fallout from COVID-19, internationally renowned business growth expert, UniSA’s Professor Jana Matthews, is encouraging companies to step back and carefully assess their businesses before making any radical decisions about their future.

“Whether a company will survive in times of uncertainty—and is positioned for growth on the other side—will largely depend on how CEOs and executives lead now,” Prof Matthews says.

“We’re all dealing with unprecedented uncertainty. And while it’s impossible to predict which companies will make it through all this, there are things they can do to increase their odds.

  1. Balance dollars with sense

Look at your accounts and project your cash flow over the next few months—do you need to collect receivables or delay expenditures? Are you in a position to lend your business personal funds? Can you ask some of your employees to take vacation days now or drop down to 80 percent, if necessary? Remember, government grants are available, so check those, too. If there’s still a shortfall, go to the bank to discuss a loan.

  1. Double down on your winners

Not every company will do it tough this year—if you produce products, such as hand sanitizers, soaps, toilet paper or ventilators, you may have your best year ever. Study which of your products or services have been selling, and focus your efforts on those. If you identify the customers who have been buying these, you can also target your marketing.

  1. Think laterally

Find out what people are buying and look for openings—can you make the straps that secure facemasks or key components in ventilators? If so, let the manufacturers know your capabilities, or alternatively, make the product yourself. If manufacturers need the product in a different way, look for alternatives. Now is the time to be flexible and adaptable.

  1. Look critically at your company

‘Strong Eye’ your company, people and products as if you were an outside investor. Are there any gaps, oversights or weak spots? Ask your employees to help scan, as these are the people in the ground, in the thick of it. What can you do better, more efficiently? Where are the double-ups? Be open and ready to listen, then take action. Also, think about what changes you—as the leader—may need to make.

  1. Have the courage, brains and heart to lead

It’s not easy to lead through chaos at this velocity of change. It takes brains to analyze and develop strategies to keep the company alive. It takes courage to stop doing what used to work and move into unchartered territory. And without question, it takes heart. Empathize with your employees who are worried about their jobs and futures, and remember to provide them with frequent updates—the good, the bad, and the ugly. Weed out any misfits, or non-performers, and do everything you can to keep your great people on board; you will need them to help you grow once we’re on the other side.

Source: Newswise

These Companies are Stepping Up in the Fight for Racial Equality
LinkedIn
A hand writing the word Inequality on glass board,

When it comes to encouraging diversity, especially during the Black Lives Matter movement, here are some of the companies that are supporting racial equality.

Bank of America

On June 2, Bank of America announced they will be pledging one billion dollars toward community programs and minority-owned businesses over the course of four years. The money was pledged in response to both the death of George Floyd and the impacts of COVID-19. Bank of America hopes this money will further help minority-owned businesses thrive, improve health services in Black communities, and open up positions for more bank employees.

Uber

To encourage its users to support black-owned businesses in response to George Floyd’s death and the Black Lives Matter Movement, Uber has announced that it will be waiving all delivery fees coming from black-owned restaurants in the United States and Canada. This process will begin on June 5 and continue throughout the rest of the year. Uber has also stated they are planning to create an initiative specifically designed to aid black-owned restaurants, as well as other businesses.

Additionally, Uber has pledged to create more diversity within their employees.

UnitedHealth Group

UnitedHealth Group is donating a pledged ten million dollars to help the neighborhoods of Minneapolis rebuild any damage taken in response to the protests. This will include five million of those dollars being donated to the YMCA Equity Innovation Center of Excellence.

UnitedHealth Group has also pledged to pay for all of George Floyd’s children to go to college when the time comes.

Disney

Disney will be donating five million dollars to companies that stand for social justice, including the NAACP, which Disney has pledged two million dollars to. Disney employees are also encouraged to donate to social justice causes, as Disney has promised to match any donation made by a Disney employee.

P & G

The umbrella company for brands, such as Tide and Olay, P & G has created the “Take on Race” fund that will be distributing five million dollars to organizations that will advance education on race, better communities, and improve all healthcare systems. The fund will be working directly with large and small organizations, such as the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, the United Negro College Fund, and Courageous Conversation.

PLANNING FOR PRIDE INSIDE: LGBT Businesses Can Power Your Virtual Pride
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When the COVID-19 crisis began, the NGLCC said that it has never been more imperative to commit ourselves to shop local, shop LGBT, give back what we can to our community organizations, and support all those around us. We truly are in this together. Pride is the ultimate celebration of togetherness, even if we can’t dance in the streets this summer. From the safety of our homes, we will be able to celebrate all that makes our community so beautiful, so resilient, and so rich with diversity.

Pride 2020 will also be a time to develop innovative ways to celebrate and show our support for our community and our allies. As NGLCC shared with The Advocate when shutdowns began, we are all in the business of “Keeping the LGBTQ Community Financially Strong During COVID-19”. As you, your community organizations, and your companies plan for digital Pride celebrations, take extra care to rely on the resourcefulness of America’s 1.4 million LGBT business owners and the services they can provide to make this Pride season unforgettable:

Pride Gear: Rainbow sunglasses and T-shirts with your company brand on them, table and home/office decorations for your online parties, and everything else you can dream of are available from LGBT-owned custom print shops like Brand|Pride and many more who specialize in making Pride unforgettable.

Streaming Video Service: From online dance parties and celebrity video fundraisers, to Pride conferences, webinars, and corporate group gatherings, there are LGBT-owned event and digital solution companies, like American Meetings, Inc., ready to take your digital Pride celebration to the next level. Don’t forget to also source your graphics and custom videos from certified LGBT designers eager to support your Pride event.

Snacks and Drinks: Whether you want a snack or cocktail to enjoy while watching the online celebrations, or are looking for Pride gifts and giveaways for your clients, friends, or favorite nonprofit, LGBT-owned food vendors, distilleries like Republic Restoratives, and micro-breweries are all available for personal or commercial celebrations ahead.

Best of all: Everything you need can be sourced directly from our own community through the vast network of Certified LGBT Business Enterprise® suppliers and affiliate chambers across America. And helping LGBT Americans through this time is key to helping all Americans succeed. We can never forget that our community includes women, communities of color, people with disabilities, immigrants, veterans, and so many others with whom we must stand in solidarity for a stronger, more inclusive economy on the other side of this outbreak.

This is also the time to remind your favorite brands, TV networks, and magazines that LGBT-inclusive marketing has never been more important. Just because we aren’t waving at your float doesn’t mean we aren’t watching how you engage with our community.  As the economy regains its footing in the months ahead, leading with a commitment to diversity — as a business owner or consumer — can help supercharge our economy and our community back to where we should be with our $917 billion dollar purchasing power. Now is the time to be doubling down on inclusive advertising so that our communities feel seen, supported, and empowered throughout — and long after — COVID-19.

Now, in this unprecedented moment, we can take pride in our purchases by supporting our community through the goods and services that power our 2020 Pride celebrations. Every dollar you and your companies spend with our community helps all of us come out of this moment stronger– and that is something that should give us all pride.

Justin Nelson and Chance Mitchell are co-founders of the National LGBT Chamber of Commerce (NGLCC).  NGLCC is the business voice of the LGBT community, the largest global advocacy organization specifically dedicated to expanding economic opportunities and advancements for LGBT people, and the exclusive certifying body for LGBT-owned businesses.