ADP Foundation Awards Grant For Mujeres De Hace Program

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The ADP Foundation Provides Grant to HACE’s Latina Women’s Leadership Program

The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement will bestow multiple scholarships with grant to expand the women’s leadership program in new key cities.

Latina professionals will have greater access to the Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement’s (HACE) women’s leadership program, thanks to a grant received from the ADP® Foundation. Many women who would otherwise be unable to afford the full tuition for the program will be able to benefit from full or partial scholarships in the fall. “The scholarships awarded will be instrumental in achieving a bigger reach in newer markets we have expanded to, such as Atlanta and San Francisco,” says Laurin Bello, HACE Program Manager, “the support ADP has given us makes them an invaluable partner for HACE as they continue to help us reach Latina professionals.”

The Mujeres de HACE program, a leadership program designed to help high-potential Latina professionals grow and develop in their careers, has successfully graduated over 800 women. The grant will allow HACE to serve 15-30 additional Latina professionals across the U.S., including Atlanta, GA; Chicago, IL; Dallas, TX; Houston, TX; Minneapolis, MN; McLean, VA; New York, NY; San Francisco, CA and Miami, FL.

“HACE would like to thank the ADP Foundation for their generous support,” said Patricia Mota, HACE President and CEO. “On average, Latinas are reported to earn 55 cents to the dollar compared to their Caucasian male counterparts, that is at least 20 cents below Caucasian women. Furthermore, Latina professionals are constantly balancing traditional cultural norms with workplace norms, which simultaneously creates unique opportunities and barriers to advancement.  With this grant, HACE will be able to impact the lives of more Latina professionals across the country, helping to close the wage and opportunity gaps that ultimately hurt our communities and the overall economy.”

Mujeres de HACE has proven to help close the wage and opportunity gaps, with over 80% of women reporting a raise, promotion or both within a year of participating in the program. After completing the program, many women join leadership boards, fundraise for program scholarships to support other women and even start their own businesses.

Continue onto HACE Online to read the complete article.

Meet The 27-Year-Old Latinx Entrepreneur Who Is Now Worth $220 Million
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aniella Pierson. who just turned 27, used word-of-mouth and referral marketing to build The Newsette into a profitable newsletter and marketing agency business. Now she's one of the richest self made women in the U.S. PHOTO COURTESY OF DANIELLA PIERSON

Daniella Pierson, who founded women-focused newsletter company The Newsette when she was 19, is now one of the wealthiest women of color in the U.S. and, at age 27, is younger than just about any self-made female entrepreneur with a nine figure fortune.

Daniella Pierson, who founded women-focused newsletter company The Newsette when she was 19, is now one of the wealthiest women of color in the U.S. and, at age 27, is younger than just about any self-made female entrepreneur with a nine figure fortune.

A Latinx founder, Pierson built The Newsette from nothing to $40 million in revenues and profits of at least $10 million last year, she says. Two weeks ago she sold a small stake in The Newsette to an investor in a transaction that values the company at $200 million. It’s the first outside money she’s taken (besides a $15,000 loan from her parents, which she repaid), and she remains the company’s majority shareholder.

She is also a cofounder and co-CEO of less-than-year-old mental health startup Wondermind with singer and actress Selena Gomez and Mandy Teefey (CEO of Kicked to the Curb Productions and Gomez’s mother). Her stake in that company, combined with cash and other investments she’s made, puts Pierson’s net worth at $220 million, Forbes estimates. (Update: on August 11, Wondermind announced on Instagram that it raised $5 million at a $100 million valuation led by investor Serena Williams’ Serena Ventures.)

Read Full Story on Forbes

Searching for a Remote Job? 5 Mistakes to Avoid
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Woman looking at computer while working remotely from home office

By Jillian Hamilton

Remote jobs are a hot search term — even in national security, thanks in no small part to workforce changes post-2020. But while many say they want to work from home some or all of the time, it doesn’t mean candidates know how to find a remote job. The candidate market may be hot, but that doesn’t mean that it’s easy to find the right job that fits you.

5 MISTAKES TO AVOID IN YOUR REMOTE JOB SEARCH

But if you’re in the market for a remote job and not finding one, you might be making some basic mistakes. Sometimes, you don’t have to overhaul everything — just make a few adjustments.

  1. Focusing only on the remote-side of the search.

When it comes to jobs, it’s really about lining up the right skills to the position. It may be tempting to apply for every and any remote job, regardless of whether or not you even want to do the actual work. However, if you want to go remote in national security, your best bet will be to keep your job search open to all requirements and focus on your specific skillsets. You may find that in a candidate market, cleared employers are willing to offer some hybrid options. You can narrow your search for specific remote jobs, but it’s important to keep your skillsets the key piece of the equation. Employers are most concerned with finding cleared candidates who meet the job requirements.

  1. Never changing your resume for the different jobs.

This isn’t a remote-only issue. It is a normal struggle for candidates, but it’s worth mentioning because it can have such a negative impact on the success of a job search. If you’re not adjusting your resume based on each job description, make that your first change you make. If you want the job, you have to connect the dots for recruiters, highlighting how your skillsets map to the job requirements. Don’t just blast your resume out to every opportunity without making adjustments.

  1. Searching remote jobs outside your geographical location.

When it comes to cleared, remote opportunities, the odds of having to make an appearance at the office or the client site are high. Unless the contract allows for billable travel, you will need to be close enough to commute in, sometimes at least once a week. Unless you have a personal SCIF at home or the contract has zero classified information that you will have to handle, then you should expect some in-person interactions will need to happen. Try narrowing down your search to opportunities that are at least a drivable distance from your home.

  1. Forgetting your network.

You build your network for many reasons, but one of the best times to lean on them is when you are job searching. Whether it’s to ask someone to review your resume or it’s to connect to a company that has remote openings, you have to remember to reach out. Asking for help isn’t easy for everyone, but every job search is made better when your network is involved. Don’t forget to reach out to recruiters as part of your network, as well as key associations in the industry. Those connections could be your ticket to answering emails in your comfy pants at home.

  1. Skipping your remote skills section.

You might not think this section is important, but you’d be wrong. If you want to have a remote job, you have to highlight how you are suited to it. Not everyone thrives or has the right skills to make the remote life work for them. Team communications and collaboration skills in a remote world need to be highlighted. How are you at tracking tasks? Don’t talk about how much easier working at home makes your personal and professional life. That shouldn’t be your reasoning for an employer to offer you a remote job. If you really want to land your next remote gig, you need to highlight on your resume your remote skills, as well as share that information during the interview too.

BE FLEXIBLE WITH REMOTE DEMANDS

Sometimes in national security, the remote jobs just aren’t there. But be sure that it’s because all the contracts are actually requiring 100 percent on-site support and not because you’re making some key mistakes in your remote job search. And you may need to be flexible on the amount of cleared remote work you can get. With federal agency offices opening back up, mask guidelines being adjusted and vaccine mandates on hold, more clients will be expecting more faces on-site. Being able to support the mission with a hybrid schedule is a win for the national security workforce.

Source: ClearanceJobs

How Rising Latino Artists Maria Isabel, Destiny Rogers, and Jay Wheeler Have Made Their Dreams Come True
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Rising Latino Artists Maria Isabel, Destiny Rogers, and Jay Wheeler

By Alvin Blanco, Genius

It’s all about talent, education, and the willingness to take risks. Music is meant to inspire, and a new wave of fresh, exciting, ridiculously talented Latino artists understands this fact.

Maria Isabel, Destiny Rogers, and Jay Wheeler are up-and-coming singer-songwriters with the talent and desire to achieve greatness. This next class of stars succeeded by tapping into education to make their dreams come true—and they’ve inspired their fans and followers in the process.

The three artists embody the spirit of the McDonald’s HACER National Scholarship, established in 1985. The goal of the scholarship is to help Latino students break barriers and make their parents and those around them proud. Over the years, McDonald’s has helped more than 17,000 Latino students—and given out more than $32 million—through the HACER program. The initiative is especially important in tough times like we’re facing now. Given the state of the world, it’s crucial for young people to keep moving forward and do more.

Isabel, Rogers, and Wheeler are certainly moving in the right direction. But they come from different places and represent the breadth of the Latino diaspora. Isabel grew up in Queens, New York, as the daughter of parents from the Dominican Republic, while Wheeler was born and raised in Salinas, Puerto Rico. Rogers, who is half Mexican on her mother’s side, held down the West Coast, growing up in Lodi, California. They all knew early on that creating music was in their future.

Dreams of rocking stages don’t always line up with the plans of parents who want more practical, and safer, careers for their children. Isabel, who dropped her debut EP, Stuck In The Sky, in October 2020, seamlessly blends her Dominican ancestry’s bachata and merengue with R&B and hip-hop and her lush vocals. She is particularly thankful that her parents had no issue supporting her aspirations.

“My parents took four-year-old me seriously when I said I was going to become a singer,” says Isabel, who attended NYU. “They never argued with that dream or told me I had to be anything different. Obviously, I had to go to school, get good grades, and all that stuff, but it was never a matter of like, pick something. I think with any first-generation kid watching your parents make sacrifices or work extra hours or whatever it may be to make it possible for you to do what you want to do, I think that was the biggest motivating force to be successful.”

While Isabel’s parents had faith in her talents, Wheeler’s classmates in school were less kind. The reggaeton crooner has spoken candidly about the bullying he faced, but he was still able to persevere and become a certified star. By posting his music on the Internet, Wheeler jump started his career. Fans dubbed him “La Voz Favorita,” and he earned praise and hands-on guidance from reggaeton legend DJ Nelson, who executive produced his two critically acclaimed albums: 2019’s Platónico and 2020’s Platónicos.

Those school bullies couldn’t knock Wheeler off his path. “I always loved music [but] I knew that it was going to be hard,” he says. “Living for something that you love is harder. I learned English in school and watching TV and movies. I knew at some point in my life I wanted to do something in the English world because [I have] a lot of respect for American music. A lot of kids [take education] for granted—I don’t know need to learn this, I don’t need to learn that—but when you get older, you realize that all the things that they gave you, you do need to educate yourself in everything, because life puts you in a different position everyday.”

Click here to read the full article on Genius.

Revamping your Resume for the New Year
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professional working on resume at his desk and typing on keyboard

Starting your new year with a job search? Use these tips to infuse your resume with energy and communicate a clear story about what you can bring to your next job.

Create a personal brand to show employers your uniqueness.

Personal branding is about communicating your identity and showing what sets you apart from others in your field. It combines the personal with the professional, since a brand encompasses your skills and talents, along with personality and style.

When competing for a job, you need to stand out. Besides helping you identify your personal strengths, having a brand can pull your resume to the top of the pile, make you shine in interviews and leave your social media readers positively wowed.

Are you ready to start thinking — or re-thinking — your personal branding strategy?

Consider several of your best work experiences and how you contributed to them. What skill or characteristic is reflected in your best work stories? How did you use it? With what result? Ask yourself: “Why do people like to work with me or employ me?” What earns you compliments or accolades? What do people depend on you for?

Here are two examples to get you started:

  • Do you take unusual care to ensure details are thoroughly thought through and accurate? Your brand could be “willing to take on the precision that scares others away.”
  • You might be an outstanding supervisor who makes operations flow and brand yourself “a problem solver who excels at developing talent.”

Your transferable skills are a major selling point; make sure to highlight them.

An important part of what makes you valuable to an employer is your skillset. There are probably some skills unique to your particular work history; take time to note these and include in your resume.

Transferable skills are those that are used in many different careers and help make you an attractive job candidate. If you have a hard time coming up with a list of skills, take a skills assessment or try listing the key tasks from your previous jobs and highlight the verbs — or action words — you wrote down.

Promote your accomplishments to advertise what you can achieve.

The first thing an employer wants to learn from a resume is “how could this person help my organization?” Your resume should give the employer a clear answer by including your accomplishments.

Think about what you did in past jobs. What problems did you solve? What solutions did you come up with? What benefits did this have for the business, customers or employees? Think in terms of the challenge you confronted, the action you took to resolve it and the end result and how it benefitted the employer.

Tailor your resume to get through the initial resume review conducted by applicant tracking systems software.

Many employers use applicant tracking system (ATS) software to make an initial sort of resumes; the software indicates whether or not a resume should move on to human resources staff for further review.

For a given position, employers specify in the ATS the skills, education and training, years of experience and other details needed to qualify candidates for a position. As applications are received, the ATS scores each one and puts it in rank order based on how well it meets the employer’s list of criteria.

But unlike a human reader, the software is likely to reject resumes because:

  • Qualified candidates fail to use the employer’s chosen keywords.
  • The system doesn’t recognize unusual fonts or formatting.
  • Candidates lack the preferred experience, but may have qualifications that could make up for what’s missing.

Be precise

While including all of the above is important, remember that no one wants to read a twenty-page resume. Be informative yet concise with your resume, keeping your qualifications within the perimeters of two pages. Think of resumes as the plot descriptor on the back of a book, they are an initial look at who you are, not a detailed explanation of every detail of the book. A good rule of thumb is to keep your resume to a maximum of two full pages.

Source: CareerOneStop

The Hottest STEM Jobs of 2023
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group of diverse co-workers gathered around conference table with laptops

As 2022 comes to a close and the New Years’ resolutions start to flow, you may have “Pursue a New Career” as one of your 2023 goals.

The STEM field is growing now more than ever with jobs in every sector of science, technology, engineering, arts and design and mathematics. Here are the top jobs in the STEM field going into the new year:

Bioengineers and Biomedical Engineers

Bioengineers and biomedical engineers combine engineering principles with sciences to design and create equipment, devices, computer systems and software. They are usually responsible for designing and operating medical equipment and devices such as artificial organs, prosthetic limbs and diagnostic technology. The bioengineering field is one of the highest “in-demand” jobs currently. They are currently estimated to grow at about 10 percent, a much higher rate than average.

  • Education: Bioengineers and biomedical engineers typically need a bachelor’s degree in bioengineering, biomedical engineering or a related engineering field. Some positions require a graduate degree.
  • Top States of Employment: California, Illinois, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Texas
  • Average Pay: $97,410 per year

Physicists

Physicists study the interactions of matter and energy. Theoretical physicists and (including astronomers) may study the nature of time or the origin of the universe. They typically work on research teams to conduct research and experiments about the natural world, but they also work to design and create lasers, telescopes and other scientific equipment that will aid them in their research. Not only are jobs in this field in high demand, growing at about 8 percent, but are one of the highest paid jobs in the STEM field today.

  • Education: Physicists and astronomers typically need a Ph.D. for jobs in research and academia. However, physicist jobs in the federal government typically require a bachelor’s degree in physics.
  • Top States of Employment: California, Colorado, Maryland, New York and Virginia
  • Average Pay: $147,450 per year

Computer and Research Information Scientists

Computer and information research scientists design innovative uses for new and existing technology. They study and solve complex problems in computing for business, science, medicine etc. and have a profound knowledge in programming, complex algorithms and robotics. Many of their day-to-day tasks consist of research, computer work, team collaboration and experimentation. Jobs are growing at a little over four times the normal rate compared to average, with a whopping 21 percent increase.

  • Education: Computer and information research scientists typically need a master’s or higher degree in computer science or a related field, such as computer engineering. For federal government jobs, a bachelor’s degree may be sufficient for certain positions.
  • Top States of Employment: California, Maryland, Texas, Virginia and Washington
  • Average Pay: $131, 490 per year

Software Developers

Software developers create the computer applications that allow users to do specific tasks and the underlying systems that run the devices or control networks. They typically work with cliental to assess the company’s current programming and computer systems and work to create systems that are more efficient and helpful to their needs. They can also be responsible for the creation, development and functionality of computer programs and systems. Software development is a rapidly growing industry with a 25 percent outlook.

  • Education: Software developers typically only need a bachelor’s degree to work in the field.
  • Top States of Employment: California, New York, Texas, Virginia and Washington
  • Average Pay: $109, 020 per year

Information Security Analysts

Information security analysts plan and carry out security measures to protect an organization’s computer networks and systems. They are heavily involved with creating their organization’s disaster recovery plan, maintaining software, monitoring networks and fixing potential and confirmed program threats. They must also keep up to date on the latest news and developments surrounding the tech field. IT Analysts are one of the fastest growing fields in the STEM field at 35 percent.

  • Education: Information security analysts typically need a bachelor’s degree in a computer science field, along with related work experience. Employers may prefer to hire analysts who have professional certification.
  • Top States of Employment: Florida, Maryland, New York, Texas and Virginia
  • Average Pay: $102, 600 per year

Sources: Bureau of Labor Statistics, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, NBC

5 California colleges recognized for boosting Latino college completion
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Students walk back to their dorms with takeout breakfast from Gastronome at Cal State University, Fullerton, on Aug. 21, 2020, in Fullerton, Calif.Irfan Khan / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images file

By Edwin Flores, NBC News

Five California four-year colleges and universities are among ten higher education institutions that have been recognized for implementing programs and strategies that are helping more Hispanic students attain college degrees.

The nonprofit group Excelencia in Education, aimed at the acceleration of Latino students in higher education, singled out the institutions through its 2021 Seal of Excelencia.

In California, the institutions are: California State University, Fresno; California State University, Fullerton; San Diego State University; University of California, Merced; and the University of California, Riverside.

Fresno State, located in the agricultural region of the San Joaquin Valley, was recognized for its paid internship program with engineering, construction management and industrial technology companies. It has resulted in substantially higher graduation rates — 72 percent compared to 48 percent of all students in the school’s College of Engineering.

Fresno State’s student body is 55 percent Latino, and 67 percent are first-generation college students.

Cal State Fullerton, the second in the state to award the most bachelor’s degrees to Latino students and the third in the country, was recognized for its Center for Scholars program, giving wraparound services to students, along with scholarship aid.

At the University of California, Riverside, Chicano/Latino graduates have tripled in numbers from 2009-10 to 2019-20, with the 6-year graduation rate at 73 percent for Latino students, compared to the national average of 54 percent. Excelencia touted its community college transfer program and a Mentoring Summer Research Internship Program.

Click here to read the full article on NBC News.

20 Latina Business Influencers to Follow Today
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collage of multiple latina influencers

Originally posted on Hispanic Executive

There are countless Latina influencers out there who have cultivated passionate followings on social media, but it takes a special type of influencer to build both a brand and a business.

And here at Hispanic Executive, we love nothing better than celebrating entrepreneurship.

Meet the Latina business influencers who are transforming their communities—and the world itself.

 

 

 

Retail

1. Ada V. Rojas, CEO and Founder, Vecina Couture

Ada V. Rojas is a mission-driven entrepreneur: all of her business efforts have reflected her desire to celebrate her Dominican American heritage and uplift other ambitious women. Her latest endeavor is Vecina Couture, a luxury loungewear line that’s been spotlighted by Oprah DailyEssenceRefinery29, and other top outlets.

2. Paola Alberdi, Founder and Creative Director, Blank Itinerary

Paola Alberdi knows fashion. She’s worked with the likes of Chanel, Dior, Gucci, Coach, and Dolce & Gabbana, not to mention lifestyle and beauty brands like Sephora and Givenchy Beauty.

Today, the Mexican American serves as founder and creative director of Blank Itinerary, a bilingual fashion and lifestyle platform that’s earned Alberdi recognition from ForbesVogue México, and Harper’s Bazaar.

3. Julie Sariñana, Founder, Color Dept.

Julie Sariñana created clean nail care company Color Dept. to be a one-stop shop for nail art aficionados “who love to be different.” All Color Dept. products feature bold, vibrant colors and are made with wheat, potato, manioc, and corn rather than chemicals and plastics.

In addition to her work with Color Dept., Sariñana runs a popular fashion blog called Sincerely Jules.

4. Julissa Prado, Founder and CEO, Rizos Curls

Afro-Mexican Julissa Prado spent years fighting her curly hair. She was never happy with how it looked, and she never found any hair products that helped.

In the years since then, she’s not only embraced her hair but created a clean, high-quality line of products designed for all curl types. Prado and Rizos Curls have been featured in People en EspañolPopSugar, and Forbes.

5. Cyndi Ramirez, Founder and CEO, Chillhouse

A serial entrepreneur with a background in fashion, marketing, lifestyle branding, and hospitality, Cyndi Ramirez has been featured by Refinery29Martha Stewart Magazine, theSkimm, and Hispanic Executive.

Her latest venture, Chillhouse, is a “multi-point retail concept” that has revolutionized the spa world. Chillhouse offers a wellness-focused self-care experience that includes a workspace, nail art studio, and massage boutique—a true getaway for those in need of deep relaxation.

5. Camila Coelho, CEO and Founder, Camila Coelho Collection

Beauty and fashion influencer Camila Coelho has not one but two businesses: her eponymous clean clothing line Camila Coelho Collection and a clean beauty brand called Elaluz. Her entrepreneurial spirit has earned her features in both Elle and Forbes.

The Brazilian American is also passionate about destigmatizing neurological disorders—she’s been battling epilepsy since the age of nine.

6. Irma Martinez, Founder and Creative Director, Trendy Inc.

A true icon in the fashion world, Ima Martinez has worked with celebrities like Sofia Vergara, Ricky Martin, Shakira, and Enrique Iglesias, to name but a few. Her company, Trendy Inc., specializes in lifestyle services for the production and entertainment industries. Martinez also offers advisory and coaching services as well as courses on the business of personal shopping and styling.

Read more about her career in Hispanic ExecutivePeople en Español, the Miami New Times, and Poder magazine.

Consulting

1. Eva Hughes, Founder and CEO, Adira Consulting

Eva Hughes was a huge name in the luxury and media spaces—she served as editor-in-chief of VogueMéxico y Latinoamérica and as CEO of Condé Nast México y Latinoamérica—before she struck out on her own in January 2018. Her company, Adira Consulting, offers brand strategy advice to clients that primarily come from the luxury sector. She also offers group and individual coaching services.

As noted in her Hispanic Executive feature, Adira is Hebrew for “strong, noble, powerful.”

2. Victoria Jenn Rodriguez, Founder, Dare to Leap Academy

Victoria Jenn Rodriguez is a business coach and serial entrepreneur who left her high-powered career in the corporate world to start a company of her own.

Her newest business is called the Dare to Leap Academy: it’s an online learning platform where Rodriguez teaches other women how to leave corporate America behind to follow their passions—without giving up their financial stability. Learn more about her in her Hispanic Executive story.

Fitness and Health

1. Michelle Lewin, Founder, One0One

Venezuelan American Michelle Lewin is one of the biggest names in the fitness world: she is a model, bodybuilder, and cover star for magazines like OxygenPlayboy, and Muscle & Fitness Hers.

Lewin is also an entrepreneur. She sells health supplements, clothing, and gym accessories and equipment through her website and has her own personal training app.

Continue on to Hispanic Executive to view the full list.

Work From Home Strategies
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Latina woman sitting at desk working At Home With Laptop Computer

By Danielle Jackola

Remote work has become increasingly popular, and while many companies utilized it as a temporary solution during the pandemic, others have realized the endless benefits of maintaining a remote workforce. Working remotely doesn’t necessarily mean you’re doing work from your home; it represents the freedom to work from a variety of locations, including on the road while you travel, from a coffee shop or somewhere that inspires you.

Whether you are considering remote work or need some strategies for keeping sane while working remotely, here are some tried and true work-from-home tips to set you up for success.

The Power of Routine

Creating and maintaining a routine will help you work efficiently and effectively. If starting your day without a cup of coffee in hand sounds like torture, set a timer on your coffee maker, so it’s ready to go. Consider the steps you need to be prepared and focused as an employee. This includes choosing a bedtime and wake-up time that supports your schedule and sleep requirements. Allow extra time for things like feeding pets, getting kids off to school or checking personal emails.

Allowing yourself adequate time to complete and shift from one task to another before you sit down for work will let you start your workday energized, focused and ready to thrive in your role. Think about the time you saved by not commuting to an office and use it to your advantage.

Maintain your Rituals

Daily rituals are an effective tool for creating balance in your personal and professional life, but they also allow you to transition in and out of work smoothly. When you wrap up your workday, tidy your workspace, shut everything down and if you’re able to, separate from your job so you can shift your energy to your personal life. Taking a walk after work to get fresh air and exercise is the perfect way to use the adjustment time to your advantage. If you live with others, define roles in your house so everyone knows what to expect and how they can contribute to fostering a low-stress environment.

Dress for Success

While the idea of working from bed in pajamas is tempting, consider the impact on your sleep cycle and your body’s ability to recognize the signals that it’s time for rest. Your bed should be a sacred space for rest. When you start your day, select attire that aligns with your job and projects confidence. As a professional, leggings and the college sweatshirt you have quite literally worn to pieces aren’t the best options. You shouldn’t be looking for places to hide when a last-minute video conference pops up. If you’re not comfortable on-screen, you need to reconsider your attire.

Dedicate a Workspace

Design a space that allows you to be organized and productive. Even with space limitations, you can choose a spot that fosters both creativity and concentration and supports you in bringing your A-game every day. Give yourself the gift of a dedicated workspace that will enable you to focus on work.

Connectivity is Crucial

Test your internet and cell phone connections throughout your home. It’s critical to perform your job as well remotely as you would in-house at your company. If your signals are weak, find ways to improve them, like asking your cell provider for a signal booster or increasing the speed of your internet service.

Gather Supplies

Consider the type of work you do and what you need to perform your position effectively. Do you need a second computer screen, specialized software, do you maintain paper files, or do you need a dedicated printer? Your role will help you determine the tools you need to be successful. Ask your employer if they provide these tools or if they are the responsibility of their employees.

Stay Connected

Maintain contact with your colleagues and communicate your preferences for communication throughout the day. Do you prefer to receive texts, emails or a phone call when something urgent arises? Does your team utilize weekly or even daily meetings to keep everyone connected and up-to-speed?

Take Breaks

The secret to maintaining sanity while working remotely? Schedule time for lunch and mini breaks, so you give your brain a break. You’ll come back refreshed and ready to crush your goals for the day.

Reflect and Adjust

Periodically consider what is and isn’t working in your remote work environment. Don’t be afraid to acknowledge if something isn’t serving you and then determine the steps you can take to adjust your situation. By allowing yourself the ability to be flexible, you can make changes along the way that keep you thriving as a remote employee.

3 Ways to Conquer Imposter Syndrome
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i-can-i-will-dice rolling over

By Lori Pugh

I’ve spent most of my professional career in the high-tech field, surrounded by predominantly male leadership. While I will always be appreciative of the mentorship and guidance I have received over the years, I’ve often found self-comparison leading the way for me.

In the STEAM fields, you’re expected to be very innovative and forward-looking. While those around me exuded confidence and self-assurance, I have often felt like I was faking it. For the longest time, I became risk-averse for fear of looking stupid. As I climbed the corporate ladder, I was sure these feelings would leave me and was disappointed to find that they would intensify.

Then, one day, many years ago, an employee reached out to me asking for advice about overcoming “imposter syndrome.” Never having heard of this affliction, my interest was piqued. After reading more about it, I realized this term describes me. Discovering that others felt these feelings flooded me with relief. In my research, I found that this “syndrome” was felt mainly by women and people of color.

Instead of being stressed, I felt challenged to learn how to conquer it. I sought coaching to help me do so, which inspired me to help others with my newfound knowledge. It has been a monumental privilege to help others learn to conquer this debilitating condition. If you can relate to these feelings, then I know you can conquer them, too. Here are three ways to do so.

1. Build self-confidence. Nobody is born with confidence. That means it can be built! Self-confidence is an emotion guided by our thoughts. If we become aware of our thoughts and identify the driving factor of negative emotions, then we have the power to target and change them. We can alter beliefs about ourselves, our career, our relationships, our lives. It’s natural for fear to crop up. That’s just the primitive part of our brains trying to protect us. With practice, all of us can rise above those natural, fear-driven thoughts and create self-confidence in every area of our lives.

2. Recognize that failing is a crucial part of success. We’ve all been taught in some way that failure must be avoided. However, when I was surrounded by software engineers, I learned that we all need to fail to improve. They call it “failing fast.” When developing software, failures or “bugs” are a normal and natural part of the testing process. It helps developers improve what isn’t working in the coding. Rather than fearing failure, look at it as a sign that you’re learning and moving forward.

3. Stop agonizing over what others may think. It’s natural for us to ponder what others think about us, but it’s the worrying that paralyzes us because there’s nothing we can do about it. Worried thoughts, however, are notoriously inaccurate. In the end, you cannot control others’ thoughts, feelings or expectations. While you may still face times of worry, you also face a choice in those moments to have courage and move forward despite any discomfort. And in doing so, you will continue to build confidence in yourself.

The journey of creating self-confidence and conquering imposter syndrome can be a long and challenging process. But if you choose to be your authentic self and have confidence in your abilities, you’ve taken the first important step.

Lori Pugh is the Chief People Officer for the nonprofit, Waterford.org. She is also a certified life coach specializing in helping women build their self-confidence and recognize their inherent brilliance. You can find more information on her website, loripugh.com, or by joining her Facebook group, “Women Walking Tall.”

Recognizing — and Celebrating — the Impact of the Hispanic Community
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Hispanic Americans are launching more new businesses, achieving higher levels of education, and reaching the C-suite of Fortune 500 companies in greater numbers than ever.

Surprisingly, these advancements and economic milestones are often unknown by the very people responsible for them  – according to a recent survey, 77% of Latinx have no idea of their communities’ potential and contributions.

In that spirit, Bloomberg is spotlighting these accomplishments – and the perception gap behind them.

By celebrating and recognizing their influence and success, Hispanic Americans can feel more awakened, empowered and secure in the progress they’re making – both individually and as a united group.

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And:
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However:

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Taking action

With this perception gap in mind, we spoke to members of the Hispanic community here at Bloomberg, learning their thoughts on this perception gap and the work necessary to close it.

As a Latina, I don’t see Latinx achievements promoted enough in our schools, the workplace, and in mass media. We are making progress through employee resource groups here at Bloomberg, which aim to highlight the achievements of Latinx in the corporate landscape and the world, but there is still lots of opportunity to expose all the wonderful growth and achievements of our community. I actively seek out Latinx representation on a daily basis by specifically supporting Latinx authors, joining organizations for Latinx advancement, reading Latinx news outlets, and supporting Latinx-run businesses. If we were more celebrated, with our contributions and presence being more prevalent, the perception could change. Our reach needs to be wider. – Juliana Rodriguez, Engineering

I’m driven by my heritage, coming from a family of Latinx small business owners and seeing how hard my family has worked over the years to start and grow businesses, making them successful not only for this generation but for my kids’ and beyond. That’s how I see the achievements of the Latinx community: work ethic, drive, and passion to pave a way for their families. There is still a huge gap when it comes to recognizing the community’s achievements because people need to care and be open to seeing this community as a whole for who they are. – Stephanie Saliba, Global Data

We need to make our collective voice louder than the spun narrative of the sensational news cycle. Let’s get comfortable with talking about the larger power the Latinx community has, including how we contribute to the economy, our workforce participation, our leading rates of entrepreneurship, business ownership, startup businesses, and overall contribution to GDP. Let’s also highlight our increased political power, in terms of percentage of the electorate, and our ability to demand change and action from our representatives that will benefit our community. – Priscilla Cunza-Marin, Global Data

Click here to read full article on Bloomberg.

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Upcoming Events

  1. National College Resources Foundation Upcoming Events–Mark Your Calendar!
    January 26, 2023 - August 3, 2023
  2. City Career Fairs Schedule for 2023
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    February 8, 2023
  4. UnidosUS Changemakers Summit
    February 13, 2023 - February 15, 2023
  5. National Association of African American Studies & Affiliates (NAAAS) Conference
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    March 9, 2023 - March 11, 2023