An immigration question for Alexa? This teen Latina coder created a Skill for it
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Suguey Carmona is seated at desk,smiling while working on laptop

By Gwen Aviles

Alexa, am I allowed to get a driver’s license? Alexa, how long does it take to get a visa? These are the kinds of questions immigrants are now able to ask the virtual Amazon assistant in Spanish and English, thanks to “Immigration Bonds,” an Alexa Skill created by a 14-year-old Latina high school student at KIPP Brave High School in Austin, Texas.

Suguey Carmona first developed an interest in coding after taking a computer class in the sixth grade. She then joined Hello World, a K-12 computer science program based in Austin and San Francisco. She became exposed to different programming languages and discovered a way to meld her love of coding with an idea to help out immigrant families in her community.

“I chose to work on this technology because I see my own friends and family who have questions and who are struggling to make a living, and I thought maybe I should do something about it,” Carmona, whose family is from Mexico, told NBC News.

Language barriers and lack of access to information can be a major source of confusion for immigrants and can prevent them from accessing the services they need, according to numerous studies. Carmona’s technology addresses those challenges by providing a judgment-free zone to ask questions at people’s pace and in their own language.

After interviewing people about their most pressing immigration questions and conducting research on the logistics of obtaining paperwork, finding employment and navigating other areas of life as an immigrant, Carmona began working on the technology, which she named “Immigration Bonds.” And so began a months long process paved with coding challenges.

“I’d work on it for hours each day,” Carmona said. “I’d start a new paper and it would crash and break and I’d be like, ‘Oh, shoot. Now I have to start over again.”

Continue on to NBC News to read the complete article.

¡Mi Triunfo!
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Meet the Latino and Latina Power Houses that are gaining the world’s attention.

Patty Rodriguez

Patty Rodriguez is best known for her role as on-air talent for KIIS.FM’s morning show with Ryan Seacrest.

“I never saw myself on-the-air,” she tells HipLatina. After 13 years On Air With Ryan Seacrest, she finally became comfortable with telling stories of local heroes. “People on social media would always tell me, ‘oh you don’t have the voice for it’ and I guess I just believed it,” she adds. She didn’t pursue it for a long time because imposter syndrome was holding her back.

Rodriguez is co-founder of “Lil’ Libros”, a bilingual children’s publishing company, and founder of the “MALA by Patty Rodriguez” jewelry line.

Rodriguez found it difficult to find bilingual first concept books she could enjoy reading to her baby, and so she and her childhood friend Ariana Stein came up with the idea of “Lil’ Libros”.

Sources: Hiplatina.com, Lillibros.com, Malabypr.com

Sergio Perez

Mexican driver Sergio Pérez, also known as Checo Perez, has amassed more points than any other Mexican in the history of the F1. But Perez is yet to match his hero Pedro Rodriguez and take the chequered flag in first.

Perez recently committed to a long-term deal with Racing Point beyond 2021. Perez has been with the team since 2013, when he signed with the group, then called Force India. The group reformed as Racing Point in 2018.

“I feel very confident and very motivated with the team going forwards,” Perez said, “with how things are developing, with the future of this team, the potential I see.”

It was also recently announced that the Mexican Grand Prix, an FIA-sanctioned auto race held at the Autódromo Hermanos Rodríguez, in Mexico City, will stay on the F1 calendar for the next three seasons.

“It was great news,” Perez said of the renewal. “It’s a massive boost on my side to know that for the next three years I’ll be racing home. Three more years to have an opportunity to make the Mexicans very proud.”

Source: formula1.com

Juanes

The 2019 Latin Recording Academy Person of the Year gala honored 23-time Latin GRAMMY and two-time GRAMMY-winning singer, composer, musician, and philanthropist Juanes for his creative artistry, unprecedented humanitarian efforts, support of rising artists, and philanthropic contributions to the world.

Juanes (born Juan Esteban Aristizábal Vásquez) is a Colombian musician whose solo debut album Fíjate Bien won three Latin Grammy Awards. According to his record label, Juanes has sold more than 15 million albums worldwide.

Source: Latingrammy.com, Voanews.com

Remembering Silvio Horta

Silvio Horta, best known as an executive producer of the hit ABC television series Ugly Betty, died in January. He was 45. Horta was an American screenwriter and television producer widely noted for adapting the hit Colombian telenovela Yo soy Betty, la fea into the hit series, which ran  2006–2010. Horta served as head writer and executive producer of the series.

Source: Wikipedia

Photo by Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Cinco De Mayo’s True History
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cinco de mayo

By Sarah Mosqueda

As we shift into warm, drinking-on-a-patio weather, you might be looking forward to celebrating Cinco de Mayo. Cinco de Mayo has become popularized as the drinking-on-a-patio holiday. But the origins of Cinco de Mayo have less to do with Tequila and more to do with unexpected victory.

“It really is an underdog story,” says Ruben Espinoza, Assistant Professor & Director of

Latinx and Latin American Studies at Chapman University in Orange, California.

Cinco de Mayo is often incorrectly billed as Mexican Independence Day, but that’s September 16. Cinco de Mayo actually commemorates the Battle of Puebla.

In the early 1860s after the Mexican Reform War, Mexico had fallen into debt to France, Britain and Spain. As a result, Mexican President Benito Juárez placed a moratorium on repayments of interest on foreign loans. This prompted Spain, Britain and France to send joint forces into Mexico. Spain and Britain withdrew, however, when they learned French Emperor, Napoleon III, was planning to overthrow the Juárez government and conquer Mexico. French troops, led by General Charles Ferdinand Latrille de Lorencez, headed toward Mexico City. But first they had to go through Puebla.

“The French forces were very equipped,” Espinoza says.

In contrast, the Mexican troops, led by General Ignacio Zaragoza, were more of a militia than an army made up mostly of farmers. And yet, in a victorious battle that took place on May 5, 1862, Mexican forces beat the French.

Juárez wasted no time declaring the anniversary of the Battle of Puebla a national holiday known as “Battle of Puebla Day” or “Battle of Cinco de Mayo.” Some sources claim the declaration of the holiday was made as early as May 9, 1862.

“That battle wasn’t the end of the war,” Espinoza says, “France occupied Mexico for five years.”

The French retreated for a year but ultimately overtook Mexico when they returned in 1863, where they remained until 1867.

“And there is certainly French influence in Mexican culture today as result. For example, with the pastries,” says Espinoza.

Mexicans and Mexican Americans may have grown up dipping orejas in coffee or hot chocolate, but these crunchy, buttery pastries are known as palmiers, or “palm trees” in France where they originated.

Today, in the city of Puebla, more than 20,000 people celebrate Cinco de Mayo with a civic parade routed along Boulevard Cinco de Mayo. There is also a historic reenactment of the battle. But beyond Puebla, it isn’t a big holiday in modern Mexican culture.

“It is not celebrated on large scale in Mexico anywhere outside of Puebla,” Espinoza says.

Cinco de Mayo is a very popular holiday in the United Sates, however. There are several opinions about how it fell into favor here.

Some point to the fact that during the time period the Battle of Puebla took place, the United States was embroiled in its own Civil War. Napoleon III was rumored to have considered supporting the confederacy, and a French takeover of Mexico could have possibly made Mexico a Confederate-friendly country. The news of the victory of Battle of Puebla might have been a moral boost for West Coast Latinos living in free states.

Others believe President Roosevelt’s attempt to improve relations with Latin American countries with the creation of the “Good Neighbor Policy” in 1933 may have had an influence. The holiday was also claimed by Latino civil rights activists in the 1960s as a way to celebrate their heritage.

Beginning in the 1980s and on into the aughts, liquor and beer companies began to capitalize on the holiday as way to market to Spanish speaking audiences.

Fast forward to present day, where Cinco de Mayo has become predominately associated with margaritas and sombrero-wearing.

But Espinoza stresses Cinco de Mayo isn’t a time to perpetuate inaccurate Mexican stereotypes.

“Wearing a costume isn’t celebrating someone’s culture,” he says, “It’s actually demeaning it…don’t treat is an opportunity to wear a costume that you think represents a population of an ethnic community.”

There are actually plenty of respectful ways to celebrate Cinco de Mayo that don’t involve drinking or fake mustaches.

Often, museums and parks in areas with large Hispanic populations host family friendly activities on the 5th of May. For example, Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California, hosts an annual Cinco de Mayo Festival that features traditional Folklorico dancing and Mariachi music performances, along with face painting and crafts.

“We will be having a Cinco de Mayo event at Chapman,” Espinoza said, “And one of the good things about having it on a university campus is there is going to be a lecture to go along with the celebration.”

The city of Los Angeles sponsored a Cinco de Mayo Parade & Festival at Oakwood Recreation Park in Venice, California, as well. The festival included Aztec Dancers, Mariachi, a classic car show, the Venice High School Band and of course, Mexican food.

“It’s a holiday that is big in US now,” Espinoza says, “and it seems like it’s here to stay. As individuals, it is important for us to learn some of that history.”

From Wilhemina Model To Skid Row
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Former Wilhemina Model pictured talking homeless woman on a sidewalk holding a pet

Iliana Belinc, a first-generation Mexican American, shares her inspiring journey from life in the fast lane as a model, to founding a groundbreaking nonprofit – PalsNPets – that supports homeless people and their pets with the belief that anyone with the right support and motivation can make a change – either within their own life, or within the lives of others.

By Tracy Yasinni

Iliana Belinc lived a seemingly glamourous life as a model signed with the legendary Wilhelmina Agency. However, the reality behind the makeup, clothes, and travel to exotic locations was much darker. She struggled with alcoholism, eventually putting both her personal and professional life in jeopardy.

At the most challenging time for the model, she happened to see a trivial incident that ultimately inspired PalsNPets, a nonprofit established to help homeless pet owners and their pets. She shares, “As I was crossing the street, I saw a homeless man sitting with his pet dog beside him. I asked myself the natural question: Why would a homeless person keep a dog – it must make life harder on them both?”

As she passed, a stranger stopped to pet the dog, and he and the homeless man exchanged natural, genuine smiles. This interaction opened her eyes to the positive energy a pet can bring to the life of someone who has almost nothing. It seemed to tap into an awareness just beneath the surface, an understanding of the importance of dogs to the lives of humans.

Fashion Photoshoot in Tulum with Iliana Belinc holding a surfboard
liana Belinc Fashion Photoshoot In Tulum, Mexico

Iliana grew up in Los Angeles, alongside three sisters, as a first-generation Mexican Americans. After high school, she began studying at college, with the dream of gaining a PHD in psychology.

In addition to the eye-opening chance encounter, she also credits her own grandfather’s capacity for compassion and bond with dogs. He rescued and cared for stray dogs in their native Mexico – a culture that didn’t see his actions as the norm for that time. Iliana notes, “I know he’d be proud that family members who after years of being unconnected are now involved with PalsNPets. Together, we’ve found a deep healing energy in the work of helping others; this energy continues to attract people who join us in our efforts.”

If there’s a message to take away, it’s that anyone with the right support and motivation can make a change – either within their own life, or within the lives of others.

PalsNPets also works to break down barriers and change perceptions, just as her grandfather did. Inspired by her grandfather’s compassion for the stray dogs no one cared about, PalsNPets has become successful very quickly. At times, she feels that PalsNPets wasn’t truly her idea at all, but a continuation of the work her grandfather began over seventy years ago.

For more information about PalsnPets visit, PalsnPets.org

Adelfa Callejo sculpture, Dallas’ first of a Latina, expected to land downtown in Main Street Garden park
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bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo

The bronze statue of Adelfa Callejo, a staunch civil rights advocate believed to be the first practicing Latina lawyer in Dallas, will soon land in a downtown park — right next to the University of North Texas Dallas College of Law and the municipal court building.

A Dallas City Council committee on Tuesday accepted the $100,000 sculpture as a donation with plans to place it in Main Street Garden. It would be Dallas’ first sculpture of a Latina, according to city staffers.

Dallas city officials and the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board agreed to the new location after Mayor Pro Tem Adam Medrano quietly delayed the plan to place it in the lobby of the Dallas Love Field Airport, which is in his district. Medrano didn’t respond to requests for comment Tuesday.

The Dallas City Council is expected to approve the donation at its Feb. 12 meeting. The board wanted to tie the sculpture’s public unveiling to the six-year anniversary of Callejo’s death, which was in January 2014, after a battle with brain cancer.

The foundation’s board commissioned the roughly 1,000-pound piece by Mexican artist Germán Michel shortly after she died. It is currently being stored in a Dallas warehouse.

Callejo’s nephew J.D. Gonzales said he was thrilled the sculpture will be downtown near the university, where it’ll be visible to students and attest to her trailblazing in education and law.

“I hope that what Adelfa stood for, and what she did and what she accomplished lives on forever,” Gonzales said.

Monica Lira Bravo, chairwoman of the Botello-Callejo Foundation Board, said she met with Medrano and Council member Omar Narvaez last month to discuss where to place the sculpture.

Lira Bravo said she suggested Main Street Garden Park as an alternative after the two council members expressed concerns over the Dallas Love Field Airport option.

Continue on to the Dallas Morning News to read the complete article.

How to decide if your social circle needs an upgrade in 2020
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Latino Business team going through some paperwork in office

You’re the average of the five people you spend the most time with, motivational speaker John Rohn once said. If you’re not happy with your current situation at work, you may want to take a closer look at your inner circle.

“We have to be really good at [deciding] who we allow into our life,” says Ivan Misner, author of Who’s In Your Room: The Secret to Creating Your Best Life and founder of the global business network BNI. “Imagine your life is one room and the room had one door. The door could only let people enter, and once they’re in the room, they’re there forever.”

It’s a scary metaphor, but it’s true, says Misner. “Think about a person you let into your life and then had to let out because they were toxic, difficult, or angry,” he says. “If you can remember the emotions and what they did, they’re still in your head. If they’re in your head, they’re still in your room.”

For this reason, it’s important to surround yourself with the right people from the start—or they’ll be in your “room” for the rest of your life.

“When you realize that this happens, you can get better at screening out people before they get in and dealing with the ones you already let in,” says Misner.

Letting people in

Opening the door to the right people means getting clear with your values. “If you don’t know your values, you don’t know where to start,” says Misner.

Start with deal breakers—behaviors that  you hate, such as dishonesty or drama. Look for people who demonstrate these behaviors, and don’t let them into your social circle.

“Pretend your mind has a doorman or bouncer,” says Misner. “Train your doorman—your subconscious and conscious mind—to identify people with these behaviors. By understanding your deal breakers, you’ll be better able to start understanding your values.”

A common mistake people make when letting others in is weighing too quickly “what’s in it for me” and disregarding the things that go against their values. When we make decisions based on short-sighted gains, we also choose values that don’t resonate with who we are.

“In physics, resonance is a powerful thing,” says Misner. “It’s a phenomenon that occurs when an extra force drives something to oscillate at a specific frequency.”

To understand how it works, imagine two pianos sitting side by side in a room. “If you hit the middle C key on one piano while someone presses the sustain pedal on the other one, the middle C of the other one will vibrate on that second piano, without [it] being touched,” says Misner. “That’s resonance. People are like that.”

When you make a decision based on what you think we can get instead of your values, you invite values that don’t align with yours to resonate in your life.

“Be mindful about creating relationships with resonance and get your values down,” says Misner. “Companies often recognize the importance of knowing your values, but people don’t always think about them. Values should be at the foundation of everything you do. Otherwise, you’ll create the wrong room.”

Dealing with people you’ve already let in

If you have people in your circle that are creating a bad environment, decide if they have to be there or if you can exit the relationship. If they must be there, it’s time to draw a line in sand.

“Evaluating your social circle means recognizing that someone may be in your life but their baggage needs to stay out,” says Misner. “Draw a line in the sand by saying that you’re not letting their behavior continue around you.”

For example, if you have a coworker who demonstrates toxic behavior such as frequent gossiping or complaining, establish boundaries. Say, “Starting now, if you start talking badly, I will walk away. I respect you and will talk to you again, but only if you can have a mature adult conversation.” Then follow through. It may take a while for the person to understand the new boundaries and rules, but once you draw the line in the sand, you can eliminate the toxicity from your circle.

“Stand firm,” says Misner. “Part of that is learning how to say ‘no.’

Continue on to Fast Company to read more.

U.S. Hispanic Population Reaches Record High
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Happy family running in the park

Latinos account for 52 percent of all U.S. population growth

By Antonio Flores, Mark Hugo Lopez and Jens Manuel Krogstad

The U.S. Hispanic population reached a record 59.9 million in 2018, up 1.2 million over the previous year and up from 47.8 million in 2008, according to newly released U.S. Census Bureau population estimate.

Over the past decade, however, population growth among Hispanics has slowed as the annual number of births to Hispanic women has declined and immigration has decreased, particularly from Mexico.

Even so, Latinos remain an important part of the nation’s overall demographic story. Between 2008 and 2018, the Latino share of the total U.S. population increased from 16 percent to 18 percent. Latinos accounted for about half (52 percent) of all U.S. population growth over this period.

Here are some key facts about how the nation’s Latino population has changed over the past decade:

—Population growth among U.S. Hispanics has slowed since the 2000s. From 2005 to 2010, the nation’s Hispanic population grew by an average of 3.4 percent per year, but this rate has declined to 2.0 percent a year since then. Even so, population growth among Hispanics continues to outpace that of some other groups. The white population saw negligible growth between 2015 and 2018, while the black population had annual average growth of less than 1 percent over the same period. Only Asian Americans have seen faster population growth than Hispanics, with a 2.8 percent growth rate between 2015 and 2018. (All racial groups are single race, non-Hispanic.)

—The South saw the fastest Latino population growth of any U.S. region. The Latino population in the South grew 33 percent during this period, reaching 22.7 million in 2018, up 5.6 million from 2008. This growth was part of a broader increase in the Latino population in regions across the country since the 1990s. States in the Northeast (25 percent increase), Midwest (24 percent) and West (19 percent) also experienced growth in the number of Latinos from 2008 to 2018.

—The states with the fastest Hispanic population growth tend to have relatively small Hispanic populations—and are not in the South. North Dakota’s Hispanic population grew by 135 percent between 2008 and 2018—from 12,600 to 29,500, the fastest growth rate of any state. However, the state ranked 49th among the 50 states and the District of Columbia in its overall Hispanic population in 2018. Hispanic populations in South Dakota (75 percent), the District of Columbia (57 percent), Montana (55 percent) and New Hampshire (50 percent) also experienced rapid growth during this period, though all have relatively small Hispanic populations.

—Los Angeles County had more Hispanics than any other U.S. county, with 4.9 million in 2018. The next largest were Harris County, Texas (2.0 million), and Miami-Dade County, Florida (1.9 million). Overall, 11 counties had more than a million Hispanics in 2018; these include Maricopa County, Arizona; Cook County, Illinois; and Riverside County, California. In 102 U.S. counties, Hispanics made up at least 50 percent of the population in 2018

—Puerto Rico’s population declined nearly 4 percent in 2018 and is down about 15 percent since 2008. The island’s population stood at 3.2 million in 2018, down from 3.3 million in 2017, when hurricanes Maria and Irma hit. The two disasters led many Puerto Ricans to leave for the U.S. mainland, especially Florida. Even before the hurricanes, however, the island’s population had experienced a steady, long-term population decline due to a long-standing economic recession.

—Latinos are among the youngest racial or ethnic groups in the U.S. but saw one of the largest increases in median age over the past decade. Latinos had a median age of 30 in 2018, up from 27 in 2008. Whites had the highest median age nationally—44 in 2018—followed by Asians (37) and blacks (34). The median age for both Latinos and whites has increased by three years since 2008, tying for the largest uptick of any racial or ethnic group.

Source:  Pewresearch.org

Meet Dulce Candy: A Beauty Influencer Empowering Women
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Dulce Candy headshot

By Samar Khoury

Dulce Candy, one of the top lifestyle & beauty content creators online, is an inspiration to women who aspire to be entrepreneurs. Dulce, a successful businesswoman, published author, and Iraq War Veteran, spoke with HISPANIC Network Magazine about her journey.

HISPANIC Network Magazine (HNM): Tell us about your background. How did serving in the U.S. Army influence your decision to become a Beauty Influencer?

Dulce Candy (DC): I was born in Mexico, Michoacan. I immigrated to the U.S. in 1994 at age 6 with my Mom and two sisters at the time. I was raised in Oxnard, California. After graduating from high school, I chose to enlist active duty in the U.S. Army because I was looking for an opportunity to start a new life and make my parents proud.

HNM: What inspired you to start your own YouTube channel? Who is your beauty inspiration?

DC: For 15 months of my deployment in Baghdad, Iraq, I was forbidden to wear any civilian clothing or makeup, rightfully so. Because of the lack of self-expression, a burning desire to express my individuality was born. I never knew how much fashion and beauty meant to me until it was taken away completely. When I arrived back in the states in 2009 after my deployment, I discovered the tiny “Beauty” community online!

At that time, there were only about 100 beauty channels with only about 20 getting all the shine, and with members of the Latinx community leading less than 10 beauty channels. Starting my YouTube channel has been one of the most important choices I’ve ever made in my life. It allowed my passion for my hobby of beauty to flourish and turn into a thriving career that is still going strong 11 years later.

My beauty inspiration at the moment is more of a “look” than a person. I am all about the dewy and real skin glam. The type of look that enhances one’s natural beauty that radiates from within. This includes soft, bushy eyebrows, glowing skin, shimmery eyes, and glossy lips.

HNM: What have you accomplished through your YouTube channel? How has your channel inspired others?

DC: I am blessed beyond my wildest dreams! One of my most significant accomplishments was publishing my first self-help book titled The Sweet Life, moderating a town hall with Hillary Clinton, and starring in a Target commercial. My hope with my channel is to inspire other young women not to let their past or where they come from define them. I also hope to encourage young women not to be afraid of using their powerful voice to convey what they want. To also live life unapologetically and on their own terms.

HNM: How many social media campaigns have you been a part of?
DC: I have been so fortunate to partner with so many of my favorite brands over the past 11 years since I started my channel!

HNM: Tell us about the brands you’ve worked with. 

DC: I am blessed to have worked with numerous brands throughout the years! Some of my favorites include my face and lip palettes collaboration with Pixi Beauty, which was sold in Target stores. Also, over the years, I have had the opportunity to travel the world with different brands, and really loved trips to Costa Rica and London with different brand partners. In 2018, I also worked with an organization called Global Glow to empower young girls in numerous communities to advocate for themselves, use their voice to create their own opportunities and affect change in their communities. I enjoyed the partnership because I was able to use my platform to shed light on an organization whose mission aligned with my personal values and beliefs!

HNM: What else do you hope to accomplish, and what other changes would you like to see?

DC: I hope we continue to celebrate diversity so that young people can see themselves represented in an authentic way that makes them feel like they matter and that they too are beautiful in their own unique way.

HNM: What’s next on your agenda?

DC: My husband and I made the decision to expand our family and go through with IVF, and I recently found out that I am pregnant! I am very excited to go through the pregnancy journey! I also want to remain focused on self-growth, family, and continue to share my journey and experiences with my audience to inspire others!

For more information on this inspirational beauty mogul, visit Dulce’s website: dulcecandy.com

Follow Dulce Candy on Twitter, Instagram @dulcecandy and YouTube at Dulce Candy.

Labels Don’t Define Who You Are
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group of professional Latinx employees

By Mona Lisa Faris

While it’s not a new word, we’re hearing “Latinx” more and more. Politicians are using the word more frequently—in fact, during the first Democratic debate this year, Senator Elizabeth Warren used it in her opening remarks.

Since its conception, “Latinx” is now a “hot” label. What does “Latinx” mean, and why is there so much controversy surrounding it? Basically, “Latinx” is a gender-neutral term used in lieu of “Latino” or “Latina” to refer to a person of Latin-American descent. Using the term “Latinx” to refer to all people of Latin-American descent has become more common as members in the LGBTQ+ community and its advocates have embraced the label.

The word was created as a gender-neutral alternative to “Latinos,” not only to better include those who are gender fluid but also to push back on the inherently masculine term used to describe all genders in the Spanish language.

I have to agree with George Cadava, director of the Latina and Latino Studies program at Northwestern University, when he said, “Latinx is an even further evolution that was meant to be inclusive of people who are queer or lesbian or gay or transgender.”

The U.S. Census Bureau still uses “Hispanic” and defines it as the “heritage, nationality, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before arriving in the United States.” For the past 30 years, we here call ourselves HISPANIC Network Magazine to encompass Latin, Mexican, Cuban, Puerto Rican, and Chicano, and any Spanish-speaking country.

As we’re sensitive to all the different cultures and labels, we have something for everyone. We are proud to bring you the powerful, beautiful and talented Puerto Rican Afro-Latina—La La Anthony. Read our interview with this superstar and how she uses philanthropy to power her causes.

Don’t let the labels stop you from voting, reading this magazine or being who you who you are. Until the next word comes, remember, labels don’t define who you are.

4 Podcasts for Your Daily Commute
LinkedIn
young woman driving with window down and smiling

Get the scoop on jobs, lifestyle, and more! Podcasts have taken the world by storm.

Instead of listening to music on the way to and from work, most people are listening to their favorite podcasts.

Many cover topics like true crime, comedy, sports and recreation, society and culture, and arts and business.

“Podcast” was formed by combining “iPod” and “broadcast”.

Many different mobile applications allow people to subscribe and to listen to podcasts.

Check out these podcasts that give you business advice and teach you about food, family, history, and more.
 

Mucho Success

Mucho Success: Advice and Success Secrets for Latinos

How can Latinos become more successful? Learn the secrets of the most influential people and apply them to your life. Join corporate executive, entrepreneur, and business coach José Piñero as he interviews fascinating leaders and brings inspiring stories, lessons, and advice to empower and elevate Latinos.

Source: The Cultivation Company

Wait, Hold Up

Wait, Hold Up!

This podcast is for everyone trying to live their best lives but need some support, encouragement, and most importantly, dope girlfriends. Jess and Yarel are there to hash out their own real-life moments as well as get into those ‘wait, hold up!’ moments with their guests! Each episode offers something new, whether they’re diving into topics like careers, spirituality, personal development, or wellness.

Source: Wait, Hold Up! Podcast

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch

Latinos Who Lunch provides a digital media platform that reflects the intersectionality between queer, Latinx, and Spanglish voices in an Anglo-dominated podcast world. FavyFav and Babelito approach the topics of identity, food, family, and history in a responsible yet humorous way.

Source: Latinos Who Lunch

Latina to Latina

Latina to Latina is an interview podcast hosted by Alicia Menendez and executive produced by Juleyka Lantigua-Williams. Menendez said, “Less than a year ago, when we first launched Latina to Latina, we produced what the two of us wanted and needed: a space for Latinas to talk about their lives and professional journeys. What we’ve learned from our listeners is that they wanted and needed this more than we even imagined. Yes, they are looking for inspiration, but we routinely hear that the sense of belonging and community is what keeps them listening week after week.”

Source: Latina to Latina

Recognizing Hispanic Heritage
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Hispanic Heritage Month

From September 15 to October 15 in the United States, people recognize the contributions of Hispanic and Latino Americans to the group’s heritage and culture.

Monday, September 16 is Mexican Independence Day. Early on the morning of September 16, 1810, Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla summoned the largely Indian and mestizo congregation of his small Dolores parish church and urged them to take up arms and fight for Mexico’s independence from Spain.

His El Grito de Dolores, or Cry of Dolores, which was spoken—not written—is commemorated on September 16 as Mexican Independence Day.

Hispanics constitute 17.6% of the nation’s total population.

By 2060, the Hispanic population is projected to increase to 119 million.

As we celebrate National Hispanic Heritage Month, we recognize some of the contributions to trending Hispanic lifestyle, business and entertainment.

 

Eva Longoria Presents Eva’s Kitchen
Actress, New York Times bestselling cookbook author, and Texas-native Eva Longoria continued her partnership with FoodStory Brands, a family-owned Arizona-based company, to bring her recipes to life. Longoria collaborated with FoodStory Brands’ Fresh Cravings to create an authentic, fresh-tasting, Texas-inspired salsa, Eva’s Kitchen Cantina Style Salsa. Source: Fresh Cravings
Selena Gomez Tackles Swimwear
Selena Gomez is taking on a new title: swimwear designer. Gomez, already a notable fashion designer with her Coach line, teamed up with former assistant Theresa Marie Mingus and swimwear line Krahs. Gomez created the “Selena” suit, a high-waisted bottoms and bra-style top that was partially inspired by her kidney transplant scar. She also contributed a one-piece zip-up suit. Source: teenvogue.com
Gaby Natale Makes History With 4th Consecutive Daytime EMMY Nomination
Triple Daytime EMMY® winner Gaby Natale made history last spring when the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences nominated the SuperLatina host to a fourth consecutive Daytime EMMY® Award in the Outstanding Daytime Talent in a Spanish Language Program category. Source: AGANAR Media
Emilio and Gloria Estefan Receive 2019 Gershwin Prize
Husband-and-wife team Emilio and Gloria Estefan were the recipients of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. The honorees represent two firsts for the prize – they are the first married couple and first recipients of Hispanic descent to receive the award. Source: blogs.loc.gov
Hispanic Audiences Drove ‘La Llorona’ To $26.5M.

The Curse of La Llorona beat the $15M–$17M domestic tracking with a $26.5M weekend win largely built on Hispanic audiences turning up at 49 percent. With a release in 71 territories, making it the No. 1 pic abroad and in Latin America, Llorona’s global purse stands at $56.5M. hispanicprblog.com

Dora the Explorer Now Live Action!
The live action version of animated series Dora the Explorer—Dora and The Lost City of Gold—debuted in August. The film stars Eva Longoria, Michael Peña, and Isabela Moner. Source: deadline.com

HNM BLM

 
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Upcoming Events

  1. 2020 Unidos US Annual Conference
    July 25, 2020 - July 27, 2020
  2. Women in Federal Law Enforcement Leadership Training
    August 3, 2020 - August 6, 2020
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    August 22, 2020 - August 25, 2020