Celebrating María Grever
LinkedIn
maria grever graphic for google

Today’s Doodle celebrates Mexican singer and songwriter María Grever, considered to be one of the country’s greatest composers.

Grever spent a lifetime producing hundreds of songs that went on to be covered by some of the world’s most famous artists, like Placido Domingo, Aretha Franklin, and Frank Sinatra. On this day in 1938, Grever recorded “Ti-Pi-Tin,” a waltz about serenading your loved ones that became one of her biggest hits.

María Joaquina de la Portilla Torres was born in the late 19th century in the city of León in central Mexico. As a child, she moved to Seville, where she studied English, French, and music. Grever’s natural musical abilities were evident as she composed a holiday carol for her school. This led her father to provide her some of the finest tutors, including distinguished composers, Debussy and Lehár. Her first record, “A Una Ola” (“To a Wave,” 1912), sold millions of copies, and was eventually covered by several singers.

In 1916, Grever moved to New York, where she soon composed background music in films for both Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. All the while, Grever continued to produce songs that married folk rhythms with styles like tango to captivate audiences throughout the Americas and Spain. Some of her biggest hits included “Júrame” (“Promise, Love,” 1926) and “What a Difference a Day Makes” (originally “Cuando Vuelva a Tu Lado,” 1934). The latter went on to win a Grammy in 1959 as sung by jazz legend, Dinah Washington.

In recognition of her contributions to music, the Union of Women of the Americas (UWA) named Grever “Woman of the Americas” in 1952.

Thanks for all the music María Grever; it continues to strike a chord with listeners around the world today!

Read the original article here.

Hear some of our favorite, iconic, and Latin LGBTQ+ Anthems!
LinkedIn
LGBTQ Flar being held up by a woman wearing a black long sleeve shirt and black net shorts.

Powerful and inspiring songs by Latin acts such as Gloria Trevi, Pabllo Vittar and Alex Anwandter have become anthems to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. These are some of our favorite, iconic and Latin LGBTQ+ Anthems!

Click here to hear some of our favorite, iconic, and Latin #LGBTQ+ Anthems!

Olivia Rodrigo’s ‘Sour’ Scores the Biggest Debut of the Year
LinkedIn
Olivia Rodrigo performing at the Brit Awards this month. The 18-year-old pop singer’s debut album, “Sour,” opened at the top of the Billboard 200 chart

, The New York Times

A year ago, the name Olivia Rodrigo barely registered in the music business. Back then, she was a teenage Disney actress who had moderate success contributing to the soundtrack of her show “High School Musical: The Musical: The Series.” What a difference a year makes — or even just five months, since her song “Drivers License” exploded in January.

Rodrigo, 18, is now a pop superstar with two No. 1 singles and a blockbuster No. 1 album — a social-media phenomenon following in the footsteps of her idol Taylor Swift, who performs at major awards shows and speaks confidently about her lineage as a songwriter. The Grammy buzz is brewing. (She’s already playing the celebrity-swag-box game.)

Rodrigo’s debut album, “Sour,” opens at the top of the latest Billboard chart with the equivalent of 295,000 sales in the United States, the biggest opening so far this year, according to MRC Data, Billboard’s tracking arm. That total includes 301 million streams, the second-best streaming number for any album this year, behind J. Cole’s “The Off-Season,” which topped last week’s chart. “Sour” is also No. 1 in Britain, Canada, Ireland, Australia and elsewhere around the world, according to Rodrigo’s label, Geffen.

In an era when new albums are typically stuffed with content to maximize their streaming yield, Rodrigo’s and Cole’s albums are unusual: “Sour” has just 11 tracks, and “The Off-Season” 12. By comparison, Morgan Wallen’s country blockbuster “Dangerous: The Double Album” has 30 songs in its standard edition, and it opened with 240 million clicks in January.

Click here to read the full article on The New York Times.

Camila Cabello Is “Cinderella” — First Photos From the Amazon Prime Remake
LinkedIn
Camelia Cab dressed as cinderella onset of her new film

Cinderella is about to get another happily ever after.

The upcoming retelling of the fairytale classic from writer-director Kay Cannon recently released photos of Camila Cabello in the title role, and the first-look is all kinds of dreamy. In one photo, we see Camila in Cinderella’s dress shop wearing her pre-ball attire: a corset-like top with flowing sleeves and a textured skirt.Her hair is gathered in a messy side-braid, and it looks like she’s hard at work making a dress to hopefully wear to the ball (assuming she’s got some mouse helpers somewhere).

In the second photo, we get a glimpse at Cinderella’s ballgown when Camila poses with actor Nicholas Galitzine, who is playing Prince Charming. Not much of the dress is shown, but we can see a strapless style with a sweetheart neckline, along with plenty of delicate rhinestones to add that magical shimmer.

Slated for release on Amazon Prime Video in September 2021, Cannon’s Cinderella will also star Billy Porter as the Fairy Godmother, James Corden and John Mulaney as mice/footmen, and Idina Menzel as Cinderella’s Stepmother. Entertainment Tonight reports that the film will contain a soundtrack filled with pop covers, along with original songs from both Camila and Idina.

While the fairy tale has been reimagined many times before, this version will put forth a Cinderella who is “vocal and active,” according to Cannon in an interview with Entertainment Weekly.

Click here to read the full article on Teen Vogue.

J-Lo, H.E.R. and Selena Gomez will headline a streamed concert to support Covid-19 vaccine distribution
LinkedIn
Selena gomez photographed smiling at the camera wearing a pink turtle neck

By Alaa Elassar, CNN

Pop and rock stars are planning a global broadcast and streaming special to support equal vaccine distribution.

Hosted by Selena Gomez and featuring Jennifer Lopez, Eddie Vedder, Foo Fighters, J Balvin, and H.E.R., the “VAX LIVE: The Concert to Reunite the World” will take place on May 8.

It will be a part of Global Citizen’s Recovery Plan for the World campaign to end the pandemic and help people recover. “The Concert to Reunite the World is celebrating the hope that COVID-19 vaccines are offering families and communities around the world,” Global Citizen said in a news release. “We are calling on world leaders to step up to make sure vaccines are accessible for all so we can end the pandemic for everyone, everywhere.”

The goal will be to “ensure equitable vaccine distribution around the world, tackle COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy, and celebrate a hopeful future as families and communities reunite after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine,” according to the international advocacy group.
Multiple organizations and political leaders have supported the concert, including the World Health Organization (WHO), European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and the State of California, the release said.
“I’m honored to be hosting VAX LIVE: The Concert to Reunite the World,” Gomez said in a statement. “This is a historic moment to encourage people around the world to take the COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available to them, call on world leaders to share vaccine doses equitably, and to bring people together for a night of music in a way that hasn’t felt possible in the past year. I can’t wait to be a part of it.”

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

A Rapper, Hitting His 30s, Reinvents Himself as a Scion of Spanish Pop
LinkedIn
C. Tangana in front of blue curtains on blue carpet while wearing a blazer, colorful top, and a gold chain necklace

, New York Times

C. Tangana, one of Spain’s biggest rap stars, two years ago hit “a little bit of a crisis.” He was riding a wave of fame, known for provocative songs and equally provocative interviews. But he was fast approaching his 30s, he said in a recent Zoom interview and risked becoming one of those “cringe-y, embarrassing” rappers who act a decade younger than they are.

So C. Tangana — real name Antón Álvarez Alfaro — did a U-turn and decided to try his hand at other styles of music that he had loved since childhood, like flamenco and rumba, even Spanish folk.

“I was opening a window I’d kept closed,” he said, adding, “I assumed it would go wrong.”

Álvarez’s experiment appears to have paid off. In February, he released “El Madrileño,” an album that mixes traditional Spanish and Latin American styles, including rock, with electronic sounds and beats more familiar to his trap and reggaeton fans. It’s turned him from Spain’s biggest rapper into one of its biggest pop stars.

One of the album’s early tracks, “Tú Me Dejaste De Querer” (“You Stopped Loving Me”), has over 100 million views on YouTube.

“You can listen to his music anytime, in any shop” Pablo Gil, a music journalist at El Mundo, a Spanish daily newspaper, said in a telephone interview.

Some of the musical styles it features were last popular in Spain in the 1970s, when the country was under Franco’s dictatorship, Gil added. Álvarez, he said, was taking old-fashioned sounds, “subverting their meaning and making them modern.”

In a review for the newspaper El País, the music critic Carlos Marcos wrote, “It remains to be seen whether this is the birth of a new Spanish pop, or something that we will forget in a few years.”

“But who cares?” he added. “Let’s enjoy it today, and we’ll see tomorrow.”

On YouTube, C. Tangana’s videos now attract comments from older music fans who would presumably never have gone near his records before. “I thought the music my son listened to was for landfill,” wrote Felix Guinnot, who said he was in his 50s, “but this boy is changing my musical perception.”

Álvarez’s road to fame has been winding, with multiple changes of name to reflect new musical personas. Born in Madrid, he started rapping in his teens, he said, but twice gave up on music entirely. When the 2008 global financial crisis hit Spain particularly hard — its lingering effects are still felt by the country’s youth — he stopped rapping to work in a fast-food restaurant. Later, he got a job in a call center selling cellphones.

He started rapping again after falling in love with a colleague. It was a toxic relationship, Álvarez said, but it inspired him to get back into the studio. “I said, ‘It must be possible for me to make money doing this rather than selling phones or cleaning,’” he recalled. “It changed my whole mentality. I started to think I had to sell myself. I started to do things to get attention.”

In 2017, Álvarez had his first major hit with “Mala Mujer,” a track about his longing for a “bad woman” whose “gel nails have left scars all over my body.” But he was soon known more for his relationship with Rosalía, a Spanish pop star (he co-wrote much of “El Mal Querer,” or “Bad Love,” her breakthrough album, although they have since broken up) and for getting into political controversies.

Click here to read the full article on the New York Times.

Selena Gomez ‘Thrilled’ to Land First No. 1 on Top Latin Albums Chart With ‘Revelación’
LinkedIn
Selena Gomez pictured in an all blue dress against a blue background with a dining table in front of her filled with food and art pieces

By , Billboard

It’s the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman since 2017. Plus: Gomez is the first woman to concurrently lead Top Latin Albums & Latin Airplay in over a decade.

Selena Gomez makes a splashy entrance on Billboard’s Top Latin Albums chart as her Revelación EP debuts at No. 1 on the March 27-dated survey. Her first-ever Spanish-language effort arrives with 23,000 equivalent album units earned in the U.S. in the week ending March 18, according to MRC Data — marking the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman since 2017.

“I never go into anything expecting a No. 1 so I do not take it for granted,” Gomez tells Billboard. “It’s always a bit nerve racking before releasing any music because as artists we put so much of ourselves out there. For this EP specifically, I was the most nervous I have been in a long time because my heritage means so much to me and I have been talking about doing this for over 10 years. I wanted it to be perfect. I am thrilled to see the response from my fans and also from people who might not have listened to my other music.”

The Top Latin Albums chart ranks the most popular Latin albums of the week in the U.S. based on multimetric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units comprise album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA). Each unit equals one album sale, or 10 individual tracks sold from an album, or 3,750 ad-supported or 1,250 paid/subscription on-demand official audio and video streams generated by songs from an album.

Biggest Week for a Latin Album by a Woman Since 2017: The seven-track Revelación was released March 12 via Interscope/IGA. Of its starting sum of 23,000 equivalent album units, album sales comprise 14,000 and the bulk of the remainder are SEA units (equaling 12.21 million on-demand streams of the set’s songs). Selena’s debut Latin project boasts the biggest week for a Latin album by a woman in nearly four years, since Shakira’s El Dorado started with 29,000 units in its first week (chart dated June 17, 2017).

“Without a doubt the most challenging aspect was having to do all of the sessions over Zoom,” Gomez adds. “We started recording the EP right before Covid shut everything down. In the beginning there were times I ended up canceling sessions because I found it so uninspiring not to be in the same room with everyone. I eventually was able to get past it and am extremely happy with how the music came together. [Producer] Tainy was very patient with me while I worked through my frustrations.”

First Album by a Woman at No. 1 on Top Latin Albums Since 2017: Revelación is the first album by a female act at No. 1 on Top Latin Albums since Shakira’s El Dorado spent its fifth and final nonconsecutive week atop the list dated Aug. 5, 2017.

Highest Debut by a Female Solo Act Since 2016: Gomez also notches the highest debut by a female solo act since Jenni Rivera’s Paloma Negra Desde Monterrey likewise debuted atop the list in November 2016. In between Rivera and Gomez, a collaborative set by two women launched at No. 1: Gloria Trevi and Alejandra Guzman’s Versus in July 2017.

Click here to read the full article on billboard.

Rosalía Just Revealed An Espadrille Air Force 1 On Instagram And I Am Spiraling
LinkedIn
Rosalia wearing a colorful bandana and looking at the camera

By Kelsey Stiegman, Yahoo Life

Yesterday, Rosalía gave fans a sneak peek at what seems to be an upcoming Nike collab starring the internet’s favorite shoe. The singer shared a video showing off the “AFI ESPADRILLE,” a Spanish take on the famed sneaker style.

Rosalía’s shoes combine the classic shape of an Air Force 1, with details taken from Spain’s traditional sandals, including a suede upper, ribbon laces, and a contrast stitch at the sole.

Inside the shoe, reads the phrase: “We just did it, Rosalía.”

As of now, Rosalía hasn’t expanded on her original post. It’s unclear whether these are a one-off design made custom for Rosalía or if these will soon hit Nike stories across the nation. That being said, the singer has been dropping hella hints on her Instagram over the past few months. First, there was this subtle shot of the espadrille sneakers…

A few days later, she posted a selfie, captioned: “Just did it.” In the pic, Rosalía wears nothing but a swoosh-printed sports bra.

Back in January, she even wore a Nike puffer jacket in the “Lo Vas a Olvidar” music video with Billie Eilish. (I’m not even including all the other Nike sneakers she’s worn because we’d be here all day.)

To learn more about Rosalia’s teaser for Nike, click here.

Sofía Vergara Partners with Marc Anthony for the Upcoming Animated Film ‘KOATI’
LinkedIn
Two photo graphs side by side, the photo on the left features sofia vergara looking over her left shoulder while smiling at the camera. The right photo pictures Marc Anthony wearing a suit and sunglasses posing with his left hand in his pocket.

By Shirley Gomez, HOLA!

The upcoming animated film Koati has Hispanic talent all over it! Grammy-winner salsa superstar Marc Anthony and his Magnus Studios team join executive producer and lead actress Sofía Vergara in this feature comedy.

“I am thrilled to join Sofía in a project where for the first time a renowned team of Hispanic producers, music stars, comedians, and actors come together outside of Hollywood to create an animated movie set up in the Latin American rainforests, which I feel is really exciting and long overdue,” the singer said, as reported by Deadline.

“I will leave no stone unturned on the music being authentic and celebrating the amazing story and message of Koati. It’s time to show the world and share what we Latinos have been enjoying for years in a very fun, inspirational film,” Marc Anthony added.

The New York-born Puerto Rican will executive produce the soundtrack of the movie alongside songwriter Julio Reyes Copello. Koati will include ten original songs, all from influential Latinx artists.

The film follows the story of three heroes — Nachi, “a free-spirited coati,” Xochi, “a fearless monarch butterfly”; and Pako, “a hyperactive glass frog” — who embark on an adventure to avoid an evil coral snake named Zaina from destroying a hidden rainforest of Latin America, “The Land of Xo.”

⁠According to the official Instagram account of the movie, the feature is “a gift from Latin America to the world.⁠”

Click here to read the full article on HOLA!

How Latino dads are using TikTok to connect with their children
LinkedIn
Genaro Rangel wears a wig and dances with his daughter Wendy on their porch in Santa Ana.

TOMÁS MIER L.A. Times

Wearing a sultry look on his face and a long, curly gray wig, Genaro Rangel pulled his fake hair out of a ponytail and whipped it dramatically over his shoulders.

“¡Qué pasó!” exclaimed Rangel, a burly, mustachioed handyman, as he yanked off the wig in his Santa Ana dining room. “It’s me!”

Genaro Rangel wears a wig and dances with his daughter Wendy on their porch in Santa Ana. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

His daughter, Wendy, burst into giggles as she recorded a shaky cellphone video for TikTok while her dad did an off-tune impersonation of Mexican legend Marco Antonio Solis, aka “El Buki.” She would post it with the words, “I’m dead,” and the hashtag #mexicandadsbelike.

Wendy Rangel, 22, often films her father, a natural jokester originally from the Mexican state of Baja California, because he does not mind making himself the butt of a joke on a social media app that he barely understands. If it makes his daughter happy? He’ll do it. Enthusiastically.

Rangel is one of a growing number of middle-aged Latino dads making appearances on TikTok, the app best known for its goofy teen videos. From papis strutting in heels and a crop top to apás joining in on skits to papás jokingly swearing in their accented English, Latino dads are racking up the likes and views from users who see their own families reflected in the short, often candid clips.

“People don’t really see this side of their dads,” Wendy Rangel said. “Most dads don’t like being recorded and they’re more protective about what people think about them. My dad doesn’t have a filter. He doesn’t care about being tough. He just likes being himself.”

And the comments under her videos, like, “Your dad reminds me a lot of mine,” and “I swear Mexican dads are straight up comedy” are proof that others relate.

These TikTok dads defy the stereotype of the machista Latino father, and their growing presence on the app shows a cultural shift within immigrant families, said Alexandro Gradilla, a professor of Chicano Studies at Cal State Fullerton.

Although there is a traditional culture of respect tied to family life in Mexico and Latin America — often embodied by the use of the more formal Spanish-language pronoun “usted” over “tú” when referring to parents — the videos highlight a type of fatherhood that is more open and lighthearted, Gradilla said.

Read the original article at Los Angeles Times .

School of Rock owners around the world are making an impact in their communities
LinkedIn
group of diverse music students in school playing guitars and drums

School of Rock owners around the world are making an impact in their communities through the power of music education. And you can too.

You may already know School of Rock from the movie, but we’re so much more. We’re innovators in the world of music education.

We understand what it takes to inspire kids, change lives, and help you succeed as a music school.

Recognized by Entrepreneur, Forbes and Franchise Business Review as one of the top franchises in the world, School of Rock enables you to mix business with pleasure by owning a rock and roll hub in your city.

You’ll be able to offer structure, guidance, education and entertainment to the lives of children and adults through the power of music. And you will own a successful business on top of it all.

Become a School of Rock owner and experience our unique franchising approach.

Find out more here.

Air Force Civilian Service

Air Force Civilian Service

Lumen

Lumen

American Family

American Family Insurance

Verizon

Verizon

Upcoming Events

  1. 2021 ERG & Council Conference
    September 15, 2021 - September 17, 2021
  2. HACU’s 35th Annual Conference
    October 30, 2021 - November 1, 2021