ANDREA MORA: THE LATINA ENTREPRENEUR HELPING BRANDS WITH THEIR MARKETING ONE TIKTOK AT A TIME
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Andrea Mora, who has over 92K TikTok followers, has taken advantage of social media to expand her business. Andrea is seated in a white lace top with her hand under her chin while she smirks at the camera

By , Influencive

One way or another, social media is a huge part of our lives. We use it to access the news, be in touch with people in different parts of the world, share memes, post our photos, and allow others to see a glimpse into our lives. However, there is more to social media than pretty influencers posting their holiday pictures. Andrea Mora, who has over 92K TikTok followers, has taken advantage of social media to expand her business. She is the Latina entrepreneur helping brands with their marketing one TikTok at a time.

If you took a look at Andrea Mora’s TikTok account, you would think she has always led a life of success in front of the cameras. But that is not the reality. That is the life she was able to build for herself thanks to her parents’ hard work and her dedication and desire to make her dreams come true. When she was young, her family was forced to flee Venezuela due to the unsafety.

They spent time in Dominican Republic, Brazil, and Panama. This experience led her to learn new languages, immerse herself in different cultures, and gain the strength she needed to face any obstacles.

Growing up, she taught herself how to use social media and became an expert at it. From growing fandom accounts and reselling them, producing content for micro, macro, and mega influencers to working for Fortune 500 companies and delivering millions of views per week.

She graduated from Full Sail University with a Bachelor of Science in Media Communications and a job that allowed her to meet all her business idols. By the age of 22, Mora was Head of Global Trends at a marketing agency and spearheaded massive social media campaigns for world-renowned brands.

But last year, facing a global pandemic, Mora realized she wanted to take a different direction. So, she quit her job and started her own company to help other brands manage their marketing and create great strategies to draw attention to their products and services.

The best proof this Latina entrepreneur can give her clients is the growth of her own brand. After two months of sending out cold emails, Mora stopped as most of her clients found her through TikTok and started conversations with her. Her social media platform allowed her to grow her business into a successful one.

Aside from coaching personal brands and businesses on how to utilize vertical video content to increase brand awareness, sales, lead generation, and income, Mora works extremely hard creating content for her own accounts. She creates videos of all sorts for her TikTok account to share daily marketing and business tips.

Some of her best tips include how to make money on social media without a large number of followers, how to create a social media strategy, debunking social media marketing myths, and how businesses can create on TikTok.

Click here to read the full article on Influencive.

Salma Hayek Once Thought Being Called a Bombshell in a Review Meant She “Destroyed the Movie”
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By Tessa Petak, InStyle

Salma Hayek has been dreaming large and shooting for the stars ever since she was a little kid. But acting wasn’t always her passion – actually, it hasn’t really ever been her passion.On this week’s episode of Ladies First with Laura Brown the actress is opening up about things that shaped her life. Not all of them are what you’d expect. For example, one critical moment in her self growth came from gymnastics. At just 9 years old, the Oscar-nominated actress was told she had a chance of making it to the Olympics. “A man approach my father and said, ‘Your daughter has the potential to go to the Olympics and actually even maybe win,'” she tells InStyle’s editor in chief.

That would’ve required Hayek shipping off to a boarding school away from home, and ultimately her father said no. She continues, “I was devastated. He said that he didn’t want to take away my childhood, but I didn’t want a childhood. I just wanted to do that. So I think that really marked me. I decided to get out of my town and do something with my life and dream big, you know?”

While acting was the avenue that eventually fulfilled her drive, she admits it’s peripheral to her passion in the industry. “When I went into acting – which I love acting – I figured it out many years later, my passion was movies. It was not acting.”

It’s safe to say her dreams of making it “big” have been surpassed over and over again. But her journey there wasn’t without difficulty. Being a Latina woman in ’90s Hollywood certainly came with its share of difficulties and discrimination.

“I think that at the time, people were not ready to acknowledge or give credit to a Latin woman, even if they saw it, even if they knew it, even if it was indisputable,” she says. “I felt a little bit like we were all missing out, not just me. Not just because they were not hiring me, but they care a lot about money, and they were missing out on a huge market.”

She continued, “I’m really proud of what I did, because if I had gotten angry, if I had given up, if I had gotten bitter, then maybe what’s happening today, maybe it wouldn’t have happened.” What’s happening today is a major career renaissance for Hayek, who talks in her cover shoot for the July 2021 issue of InStyle about returning to her action-heroine roots, now, in her 50s.

Luckily she had a few Latina friends and peers in the industry to act as allies and go through it together, like Penélope Cruz and Jennifer Lopez. “Jennifer, Penélope, and I were allies from the beginning,” she explains. “Jennifer is a different kind of personality, but she’s an incredibly hard worker, but it’s just a different type of personality. Penelope and I still have the club.”

The two stars have fostered a strong relationship that has stood the test of time (and Hollywood pressures) and remain friends to this day.

“She calls any given moment,” she says. “I don’t think there’s anyone in the entire world that can understand what I’ve gone through professionally as an immigrant in another country. No one in the world can understand me like Penélope.”

Click here to read the full article on InStyle.

7 Networks for Latina Professionals or Entrepreneurs
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Large group of latina women reaching up to the camera

By Lorraine C. Ladish, NBC News

If you are a Latina entrepreneur or professional, you are not alone. The National Women’s Business Council states that Latinas own close to 788,000 businesses in the U.S. One of the best ways to grow as a businesswoman is to network with others who face similar issues and perhaps even share your vision. There are countless business networks out there, and these are just seven that cater specifically to Latinas.

What all these networks have in common is that they are geared towards women, although a couple shared that they may include “a few good men.” They all have a website where you can read more about each of them and sign up if you wish to. They all provide interesting content aimed at entrepreneurs and professional women. The order in which they are listed is absolutely arbitrary, and they are by no means the only Latina business networks that exist today.

1. BeVisible.soy

BeVisible is an online recruiting platform and an online community for Latinas that allows women to connect and collaborate, grow their network, find mentors, interact with peers and find job and educational opportunities.

Latina career women can sign up on their website. There is no fee for the users.

Andrea Guendelman shared with us an anonymous quote from one of their millennial members: “I am drawing on the strength of my community, and am even stronger because of it. Because we are more than a list of accomplishments and professional headshots. We are empowered Latinas ready to take on the world and make ourselves visible.”

2. Hispanic Women in Leadership (HWIL)

HWIL is a nonprofit organization established in Texas in 1989.

HWIL is a service organization committed to promoting the advancement of Hispanics and women in the areas of education, professional interaction, leadership training, mentorship and the perpetuation of Latino culture.

HWIL accepts application requests on their website. There are several membership options, to include volunteers (non paying) and as members.

“In addition to providing College Scholarships, and in line with our strategic plan beginning in 2016, HWIL will begin a Summer Mentorship Program for young ladies in their teens,” said Rita A. Lopez, its president.

3. Suits, Stilettos and Lipstick

The mission of Suits, Stilettos and Lipstick is to create a movement that will empower women to live a healthy, happy, balanced and purposeful life. Their online and live events include conferences, webinars, teleconferences, retreats, workshops, seminars, networking opportunities, coaching, mentoring, and much more. There is a basic (free) and premium (paid) membership. Women may read the advantages of each membership and sign up on the webpage.

“We come in different ages, shapes, shades and sizes. We are SASSY (Smart, Assertive, Strategic, Selfless and Young-at-heart). Whether you are looking for self-improvement tools, social or business connections or career and business development, SSL is here for you,” said Elizabeth King.

4. LatinasinBusiness.us

The goal of LatinasinBusiness.us is to bring together a community of bloggers, writers, vloggers, communicators, and business owners advocating to support, enrich and empower Latinas in business and the workplace.

Click here to read the full article on NBC News.

Tim Burton’s Wednesday will be a Latina, played by Jenna Ortega
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Tim Burton's Wednesday will be a Latina, played by Jenna Ortega

By Tatiana Tenreyro, AV Club

When Raúl Juliá was cast as Gomez Addams in 1991’s The Addams Family and its sequel, Addams Family Values, it turned the Addams into a half-Latinx family. The late Puerto Rican actor was the only Hispanic member of the cast, but many Latinx fans still felt represented knowing the patriarch is Latino. Back in February, it was announced that Tim Burton is working on a live-action Addams Family spin-off focused on Wednesday for Netflix, named after the character. And thankfully, us Latinxs are finally getting the Latina Wednesday we deserve. YOU’s Jenna Ortega announced she will play the iconic young misfit in an Instagram post. “New chapter. Hope I can do Wednesday Addams justice. *snaps twice*,” she wrote. Ortega’s casting confirms that The Addams are supposed to be Latinx, and we can’t wait to see who’ll play Gomez, Morticia, Pugsley, and the rest of the family.

Netflix also shared the official logline, which reads, “The series is a sleuthing, supernaturally infused mystery charting Wednesday Addams’ years as a student at Nevermore Academy. Wednesday’s attempts to master her emerging psychic ability, thwart a monstrous killing spree that has terrorized the local town, and solve the supernatural mystery that embroiled her parents 25 years ago — all while navigating her new and very tangled relationships at Nevermore.”

Click here to read the full article on AV Club.

Camila Cabello Is “Cinderella” — First Photos From the Amazon Prime Remake
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Camelia Cab dressed as cinderella onset of her new film

Cinderella is about to get another happily ever after.

The upcoming retelling of the fairytale classic from writer-director Kay Cannon recently released photos of Camila Cabello in the title role, and the first-look is all kinds of dreamy. In one photo, we see Camila in Cinderella’s dress shop wearing her pre-ball attire: a corset-like top with flowing sleeves and a textured skirt.Her hair is gathered in a messy side-braid, and it looks like she’s hard at work making a dress to hopefully wear to the ball (assuming she’s got some mouse helpers somewhere).

In the second photo, we get a glimpse at Cinderella’s ballgown when Camila poses with actor Nicholas Galitzine, who is playing Prince Charming. Not much of the dress is shown, but we can see a strapless style with a sweetheart neckline, along with plenty of delicate rhinestones to add that magical shimmer.

Slated for release on Amazon Prime Video in September 2021, Cannon’s Cinderella will also star Billy Porter as the Fairy Godmother, James Corden and John Mulaney as mice/footmen, and Idina Menzel as Cinderella’s Stepmother. Entertainment Tonight reports that the film will contain a soundtrack filled with pop covers, along with original songs from both Camila and Idina.

While the fairy tale has been reimagined many times before, this version will put forth a Cinderella who is “vocal and active,” according to Cannon in an interview with Entertainment Weekly.

Click here to read the full article on Teen Vogue.

Miss Mexico Andrea Meza Crowned Miss Universe 2021
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Miss Mexico Andrea Meza is crowned Miss Universe 2021 onstage at the Miss Universe 2021 Pageant at Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino

By Kaitlin Reilly, NBC Los Angeles

And we have a new Miss Universe.

After more than a year delay due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Miss Universe competition was finally held Sunday at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida. Mario Lopez and former Miss Universe Olivia Culpo, who won the crown in 2012, co-hosted the show, which featured a special performance by Luis Fonsi.

Taking home the ultimate crown this year was Miss Mexico Andrea Meza, who wowed the selection community with her beauty and brains.

During the final statement round, Miss Mexico was asked to address the topic of changing beauty standards.

“We live in a society that more and more is more advanced and as we have advanced as a society, we have advanced with stereotypes,” she shared via translator. “Nowadays, beauty is not only the way we look. For me, beauty radiates not only in our spirits, but in our hearts and the way we conduct ourselves. Never permit someone to tell you that you are not valuable.”

And just minutes before, Miss Mexico also faced the final question round where she was asked to share how she would have handled the COVID-19 pandemic.

“I believe there is not a perfect way to handle this hard situation such as COVID-19,” she said. “However, I believe that what I would have done, was create the lockdown even before everything was that big because we lost so many lives and we cannot afford that. We have to take care of our people. That’s why I would have taken care of them since the beginning.”

Before the show, Paula M. Shugart, who serves as the president of the Miss Universe Organization, addressed the pandemic and how the pageant was staying safe.

“We have spent months planning and preparing safety precautions to develop this edition of Miss Universe – one that will be memorable, special and totally innovative,” she said in a statement.

Beauty queens from 74 countries and territories competed in the pageant, however just 21 contestants advanced to the final round. After first competing in the swimsuit contest, which you can see photos from here, 10 moved on to the evening gown competition. Five contestants were selected to participate in the question and answer round.

The last time the Miss Universe pageant was held was in 2019, when Miss South Africa, aka Zozibini Tunzi, took home the ultimate prize. Miss Puerto Rico Madison Anderson was the first runner-up and Miss Mexico Sofa Aragn was the second runner-up.

Click here to read the full article on NBC Log Angeles.

These Latina Businesses Are Changing How LA Shops — Online And IRL
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Latina Business Hija de tu Madre, a clothing, accessories and jewelry brand founded by Patty Delgado.

By Eva Recinos, LA ist

It’s easy to feel cynical about companies pushing identity for profit — witness major retailers stamping feminist mottos on everything from t-shirts and tote bags to baby onesies and barware — but some local brands are the genuine article. They’re not jumping on any bandwagon. They’re Latina-owned lifestyle businesses, creating and selling items to their communities. “We’re at a time where people are craving independently made wares, handmade wares and cultural goods,” says Noelle Reyes, co-founder of Highland Park boutique Mi Vida.

As online shopping decimates mega malls and forces old school retailers to rethink their strategies, independent brands are stepping up, using social media and community connections to make their mark. These businesses represent only a few of the city’s budding entrepreneurs but they’re making an impact — both online and in the real world.

Social Media Stars
Leah Guerrero has been making holistic skincare products — facial masks, face and body creams, hydrosols — since 2013. Two years ago, using knowledge and ingredients she gleaned from her trips to the mercados of Mexico City, she founded Brujita Skincare out of her home. She began selling her wares at Molcajete Dominguero, a now-monthly Latinx pop-up market in Boyle Heights. Her target audience? People looking for affordable vegan and cruelty-free products.

As the crowds grew, so did her social media following. Guerrero started sending products to friends and influencers. That “ricocheted into all of these people finding out about Brujita through Instagram,” she says.

To keep up with demand, she currently produces “thousands of units a month” at a rented studio in downtown Los Angeles. In April, Brujita launched a Green Collection in collaboration with Hotel Figueroa. Guests who order the Self-Care Package through mid-September get a one-night stay and a sleek toiletry bag containing four of the brand’s products.

With more than 19,000 followers, Brujita’s Instagram account features the requisite product photos, GIFs and behind-the-scenes peaks at new products. Guerrero engages with customers via DM and shares info on the account about the ingredients in each product. “With the engagement comes trust, and trust in my community means a whole lot to me,” she says.

Brujita has built a community that Guerrero wants to continue nurturing, particularly Latinx and LGBTQ+ groups. The brand’s current studio, in downtown Los Angeles, serves as a safe space for the LGBT community, with many “friends coming in and out and doing their creative work,” Guerrero says. Brujita is meant to be stylish, accessible and inclusive, a counterpoint to mainstream skincare brands built on Western ideals of beauty. Guerrero says a more formal physical location for Brujita Skincare is in the works.

Brick By Brick
For other Los Angeles brands, the IRL business came before the social media one. Reyes and her cousin, Danelle Hughes, opened Mi Vida in 2008, two years before Instagram debuted. The Highland Park shop sells clothes, housewares and art. It also functions as a gallery and a community hub, hosting poetry readings, yoga classes and meditation workshops.

“If you were a business that was a brick and mortar when social media came on, it’s almost like you automatically had to take on this new career,” Reyes says.

She began using photography to promote her products and it became a creative outlet. Instagram is also a way for her to scout and connect with new artists, some of whom have been featured in the store. Although Reyes has noticed more customers visiting Mi Vida after discovering it online, the connection also works the other way. For her, social media is a tool to supplement her store’s presence in a neighborhood where the founders have been working hard for years.

Conversations about gentrification in Boyle Heights are heated, and Mi Vida’s owners are aware of the controversy. “We hear all the time how great it is to have a space like ours on this street,” Reyes says. “That is something we don’t take lightly. We work very hard every day to continue to be a positive light in our community and offer products that bring a positive vibe.”

Click here to read the full article on LA ist.

Eva Longoria’s Flamin’ Hot Cheetos movie is finally a go
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Eva Longoria poses on the red carpet

By Lillian Stone, Yahoo! Life

The world’s been waiting with bated breath since 2018, when Fox Searchlight announced a biopic about Richard Montañez, the creator of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. Now, Flamin’ Hot is moving forward with Eva Longoria set to direct and actors Jesse Garcia and Annie Gonzalez slated for the lead roles.

Longoria is an experienced TV director, with credits including Devious Maids, Black-ish, The Mick, and Telenovela. Now, she’s entering a feature directorial era with the Searchlight project, focusing on the story of Richard Montañez. Variety explains that Montañez, the son of Mexican immigrant farm workers, started as a janitor at the Frito-Lay factory in Rancho Cucamonga, California, before inventing the wildly popular snack food.

As Newsweek explains, Montañez invented the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto after a broken machine on the Cheetos assembly line produced a batch of plain, undusted Cheeto puffs. Montañez took the Cheetos home and dusted them with chili powder, an idea inspired by elotes street vendors. He then pitched the recipe to Roger Enrico, the company’s CEO at the time. Now, Flamin’ Hot Cheetos are a junk food staple.

Longoria told Variety that it was her “biggest priority to make sure we are telling Richard Montañez’s story authentically.” She went on to comment on the actors, saying: “I am so happy to have two extremely talented and fellow Mexican Americans on board in these pivotal roles. Jesse and Annie have a deep understanding of our community and will be able to help tell this story of great importance for our culture.”

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

Latin music star Prince Royce on early roots and returning to the Bronx for a show highlighting Hispanic culture
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Prince Royce pictures holding a six pack of Presidente beet in front of a brewery bar

By , BX Times

Latin pop superstar Prince Royce recently returned to his native Bronx for a live (and live streamed) show.

Born and raised in the Bronx, Royce says that he got his start by singing in the shower. Both of Royce’s parents were born and raised in the Dominican Republic, and growing up Royce became no stranger to the music of his cultural background.

“My mom would encourage me a lot in my singing,” said Royce. “In the Bronx and Washington Heights, we’d listen to a lot of bachata, merengue, especially in my household. That drew me into getting into the rhythm, giving it my own little New York American Dominican style into the genre.”

Royce started to record his own music when he was 16 years old out of a friend’s studio in the Bronx. He started to develop his own style of music based off of what he heard growing up but put his own New York City twist to the performance.

“When I go to school or am talking to friends or brothers and sisters, we talk Spanglish. In my concerts, I sing in Spanish and talk to them in English. That was really how my music is, sometimes I sprinkle a little English in,” said Royce. “That’s who I sing for, I sing for people kind of like me that grew up in the states and love Latin music. I love Latin music but I also listen to hip hop, stuff like Usher and Jay Z. I think that’s what my music is. I’m singing mostly in Spanish but I sprinkle in a little New York flavor, and I think that with the Dominican style works.”

Now, with six albums under his belt and multiple #1 hits, Royce has certainly made a name for himself in the genre. However, Royce admits that it didn’t click for him that music was going to be sustainable for him until he was well into his career.

“I think it was late in because in the beginning when I was on the radio and making money from music, there’s still an uncertainty. You start to think, one if this is a one-hit-wonder kind of thing? What if after 2-3 years I’m still not here?” said Royce. “I think like 7 years in, I was like, ‘Man i’m still here!’ I’m still connecting with the people, it’s another #1 hit, 14-15 platinum hits. I think, ‘Man, this is dope, I could do this another 10 years.’ That’s when I felt really good about myself and really confident and solid.”

Royce recently partnered with Presidente beer to participate in Reventón de Verano (hosted by Anheuser-Busch), a one-day music festival that took place over livestream with artists across the globe. For the first time in over a year and a half, Royce hit the stage for an intimate show in the Bronx to celebrate Hispanic culture.

For Royce, the partnership with Presidente was a no-brainer — in addition to having worked with the brand in the past, Presidente is something that Royce says is very close to his Dominican culture.

“El Presidente is a Dominican beer that kind of was there in my upbringing and when I go to the Dominican Republic,” said Royce. “When they approached me about doing this show, I liked it because it’s something that culturally, every Dominican knows about this beer, growing up it’s a brand that we know always look for. It’s close to my family and upbringing.”

More importantly to Royce, he wanted to do something for his fans, and Presidente was the perfect partner for him to get it done.

“It’s about the fans as well. I haven’t sung in front of a small audience in a year and a half since my tour got canceled,” said Royce. “I think that there’s a bunch of stuff that’s all for the people, and this beer has always felt like it was for the people.”

Royce is currently working on new music, but he looks forward to the days when the pandemic is finally behind us and can perform and hang out with his family without risk.

Click here to read the full article on BX Times.

Meet Bianca Kea, Founder of ‘Yo Soy Afro Latina’
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so yo afro latina founder Bianca Kea seated on a stoop where a pink shirt that says morenita
By Erica Nahmad, Be Latina

Sometimes the best business ideas don’t necessarily come out of a groundbreaking new product concept but rather out of an authentic desire to fill a void. In the case of Yo Soy Afro Latina, founder Bianca Kea built her brand out of a genuine desire to create a community for Afro Latinas who wanted to be seen and who wanted to belong.

This Latina entrepreneur created a brand that empowers and that brings people together. It’s so much more than a collection of cool products — though the products are undeniably cool. Yo Soy Afro Latina is on a mission to bring awareness and acknowledgment to the often-overlooked Afro Latina community and shed light on Afro Latinas’ beauty everywhere. Now that is a mission we can get behind.

Bianca Kea grew up in a suburb of Detroit that was primarily black and white, with few (if any) Afro Latinas to relate to. Although her single mother did her fair share to pass on her Latinidad to her daughter and educate her about her Mexican roots, Kea still grew up without a true understanding of what it even means to be an Afro Latina.

She felt a disconnect from the Latin community, she explains on the Yo Soy Afro Latina website. She didn’t look like other Latinas or what she thought a Latina should look like. She knew that she identified as a Latina but felt she wasn’t quite Latina enough.

Beyond trying to find other women she could relate to in her surroundings, Bianca also recalls struggling to find role models in pop culture she could identify with. “Celia Cruz was the only Afro-Latina that I saw on mainstream media, so I aspired to be like her. She was just so proud to be this Black Latina,” she told PopSugar. “I wanted to feel that empowered and feel that confident and comfortable in my own skin.”

Her upbringing and longing for an opportunity to truly understand her multifaceted identity led Bianca to create Yo Soy Afro Latina — a move that would not only help her come to terms with her own background but also help Afro Latinas everywhere feel a sense of belonging.

Click here to read the full article on Be Latina.

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s ‘Vivo’ Debuts Colorful Teaser Trailer & Announces Move to Netflix
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Vivo star Lin Manuel photographed wearing a black long sleeve t shirt in front of a gray background

Set in Havana, Cuba, the upcoming animated feature film Vivo will give Broadway star Lin-Manuel Miranda (In the Heights, Hamilton) another stage to play on.

Vivo tells the story of a kinkajou, a tropical rainforest mammal also known as the “honey bear,” who entertains people in Havana Square by playing music alongside his owner Andrés (Juan de Marcos González of the Buena Vista Social Club). When Andrés has to make a trip to Miami, Vivo must get help from a high-spirited tween girl (Ynairaly Simo) to deliver a message to Miami before it’s too late.

In the first teaser trailer for the film, Andrés is seen pushing out a small street organ into the center of Havana and introducing “the one and only Vivo” to the crowd who has gathered there that day.

Vivo, who is voiced by Miranda, hops out from behind the curtains wearing a Fedora-style hat and takes his place atop the cart where a set of percussion instruments await. From there, we watch Vivo do some acrobatic moves as the Cubans in the area dance to the song Andrés is belting out. “Is this thing on?” Vivo asks, using one of his maracas like a microphone.

On Tuesday (April 28), it was announced that Vivo, which was supposed to have a June 4 theatrical release, would now debut on Netflix. A new release date has not been set.

“Bringing Vivo to life has been an incredible artistic journey,” Miranda told Variety. “I’m so excited Vivo will have a home at Netflix, where kids of all ages will be able to enjoy the film’s songs and adventures again and again.”

Click the link here to read the full article on Vivo and Lin-Manuel Miranda on Remezcla.

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