Eva Longoria’s Flamin’ Hot Cheetos movie is finally a go
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Eva Longoria poses on the red carpet

By Lillian Stone, Yahoo! Life

The world’s been waiting with bated breath since 2018, when Fox Searchlight announced a biopic about Richard Montañez, the creator of Flamin’ Hot Cheetos. Now, Flamin’ Hot is moving forward with Eva Longoria set to direct and actors Jesse Garcia and Annie Gonzalez slated for the lead roles.

Longoria is an experienced TV director, with credits including Devious Maids, Black-ish, The Mick, and Telenovela. Now, she’s entering a feature directorial era with the Searchlight project, focusing on the story of Richard Montañez. Variety explains that Montañez, the son of Mexican immigrant farm workers, started as a janitor at the Frito-Lay factory in Rancho Cucamonga, California, before inventing the wildly popular snack food.

As Newsweek explains, Montañez invented the Flamin’ Hot Cheeto after a broken machine on the Cheetos assembly line produced a batch of plain, undusted Cheeto puffs. Montañez took the Cheetos home and dusted them with chili powder, an idea inspired by elotes street vendors. He then pitched the recipe to Roger Enrico, the company’s CEO at the time. Now, Flamin’ Hot Cheetos are a junk food staple.

Longoria told Variety that it was her “biggest priority to make sure we are telling Richard Montañez’s story authentically.” She went on to comment on the actors, saying: “I am so happy to have two extremely talented and fellow Mexican Americans on board in these pivotal roles. Jesse and Annie have a deep understanding of our community and will be able to help tell this story of great importance for our culture.”

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

What Is Hispanic Heritage Month—And How Is It Celebrated?
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Hispanic heritage month traditional dress

By Robyn Moreno

Hispanic Heritage Month highlights the achievements and contributions of Latinxs across the United States—and beyond.

While most people know about pop icons including Jennifer Lopez, Selena, and Demi Lovato; political powerhouses like Sonia Sotomayor and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, legends like EGOT winner Rita Moreno; sports heroes including Oscar de la Hoya and Mariano Rivera, and other famous Hispanic Americans, Hispanic Heritage Month shines a light on the broader (and lesser-known) accomplishments of Latinxs across genres. From Latinxs lighting up Hollywood (in front of and behind the screen) to books penned by LatinX authors, to diverse Latin foods and music and so much more, Latinxs have contributed to every facet of American society. Read on to learn more about what is Hispanic Heritage Month and how Latinxs have helped define American culture.

What is Hispanic Heritage Month?
According to the Hispanic Heritage Month official website, it is observed: “by celebrating the histories, cultures, and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America.” For generations, Latinxs have contributed to the food, music, business, science, and culture that we know as American, and the 30 days that make up Hispanic Heritage Month each fall is just one opportunity to showcase these achievements.

Latinxs are the country’s second-largest racial or ethnic group, behind white non-Hispanics according to the latest 2020 census. Latinxs now account for 18.7 percent of the U.S. population up 2.4 percent in the previous decade with 62.1 million Latinxs living across America with big concentrations in New York, California, Texas, and Florida.

When is Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated annually from September 15 to October 15. Its timing coincides with the Independence Day of Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua which are all celebrated on September 15. Mexico, Chile, and Belize also celebrate their respective independence days in that same time frame. In addition, on October 12, (Columbus Day/Indigenous People’s Day in the United States) Mexico celebrates Día de la Raza (Race Day) “in recognition of the mixed indigenous and European heritage of Mexico.”

Hispanic Heritage Month is similar to other months of recognition and celebrations like Native American History Heritage Month in November, African American History Month in February, Asian American Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, and LGBTQ Pride Month in June.

What’s the history behind Hispanic Heritage Month?
Hispanic Heritage Month first started as a week when it was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1968. According to Congressional history, the week was created to bring attention and awareness to “Hispanic-American contributions to the United States,” along with networking opportunities for “grassroots and civil rights activists inside and outside the Hispanic-American community.”

Almost 20 years later, Representative Esteban Torres of California, a proud Mexican-American, submitted a bill to expand it into Hispanic Heritage Month in 1987 saying supporters of the bill “want the American people to learn of our heritage. We want the public to know that we share a legacy with the rest of the country, a legacy that includes artists, writers, Olympic champions, and leaders in business, government, cinema, and science.” That bill didn’t pass, but Senator Paul Simon of Illinois submitted a similar bill that President Ronald Reagan signed into law in 1988 creating now what is Hispanic Heritage Month.

Click here to read the full article on RD.

Jennifer Lopez Steps Out in Hometown of the Bronx to Support Latina-Owned Small Businesses
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Jennifer Lopez posing in Bronx bookstore smiling

By Rachel DeSantis, People

Jennifer Lopez is still giving back to the block that raised her.

The star made an appearance in New York City to support Latina small business owners in her hometown of the Bronx of Sunday, which comes as the first part of a new philanthropy push for Lopez.

The Hustlers actress, 52, stopped by indie bookstore The Lit. Bar alongside Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon and Isabella Guzman, the administrator of the U.S. Small Business Administration, and announced a new partnership with Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses meant to help elevate and support Latina entrepreneurs.

While there, the trio spoke with the store’s founder Noelle Santos and other Latina business owners about growing their businesses and how they’ve navigated the pandemic, just in time for National Hispanic Heritage Month, which kicks off this week.

Lopez’s new partnership with Goldman Sachs will work to recruit more Latina entrepreneurs to 10,000 Small Businesses, a program that offers support and opportunities to help owners grow their companies and create new jobs.

It’s the first initiative for the “On the Floor” singer under an upcoming philanthropy push called Limitless Labs.

Photos and video published by TMZ show that Lopez — who made a surprise appearance at the MTV VMAs hours later as a presenter — was accompanied to the event by boyfriend Ben Affleck, with whom she recently rekindled her romance nearly 18 years after they called off their engagement.

Click here to read the full article on People.

Rosalía’s Performance Stole The Show At The VMAs — & So Did Her Manicure
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Rosalía at the TV VMAs on the red carpet in a black dress

By THATIANA DIAZ, Refinery29

When music artists were asked who they were looking forward to seeing during the red carpet pre-show for the 2019 MTV VMAs, one name kept coming up again and again: Rosalía.

And well, the Spanish singer lived up to all the hype with a show-stopping performance of her hits “A ningún hombre,” “Yo x Ti, Tu x Mi,” and “Aute Cuture.”

But it wasn’t just her soaring voice or impressive dance moves that caught everyone’s attention — her stiletto nails were also worthy of applause.

It was impossible to miss Rosalía’s studded black manicure as she clutched the microphone during her performance and held her trophies for Best Latin Video and Best Choreography at the end of the night.

The extra-long, bedazzled manicure was the perfect addition to her head-to-toe black ensemble with silver detailing.

 

If you’re not familiar with Rosalía, statement nails are her signature.

Rosalía close up of textured spike-like black nailsJust one glimpse at her music videos or past performances, and you’ll see her with the most elaborate manicure designs — like the golden, rose-adorned claws she wore for the “Aute Cuture” music video.

Statement nails were everywhere at the MTV VMAs: Lizzo wore a shimmering grape look that complemented her bright red dress, and Cardi B opted for long, gold-dusted nails.

All the effort the stars put into the small details didn’t go unnoticed, as one fan tweeted with a heart-eye emoji: “The nails tonight.”

Click here to read the full article on Refinery29.

Camila Cabello condemns ‘ridiculous’ and ‘toxic’ beauty standards: ‘My weight is gonna go up and down’
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Camila Cabello is setting the record straight when it comes to her opinion of society's beauty standards and how she's not allowing them to control her.

By Kerry Justich, Yahoo! Life.

Camila Cabello is setting the record straight when it comes to her opinion of society’s beauty standards and how she’s not allowing them to control her.

On The Late Late Show with James Corden, the 24-year-old singer recalled a recent body-shaming incident where she explained that she was secretly photographed by paparazzi while going on a run in West Hollywood, Calif. “I had my belly out, I didn’t know anybody was taking pictures of me,” she said. But once she saw photos of her body making the rounds in tabloids, she began to have “anxious thoughts” about having her stomach exposed and not “tucking in” — until she made the decision to speak to the photos directly and control how they were being perceived.

“I was like, you know what, this is normal. It’s like my weight is gonna go up and down, also we have these crazy beauty standards from freakin’ Instagram of people that are photoshopped or if they’re not photoshopped, it’s not every woman’s body,” Cabello said. “And I was just like, you know let me get on TikTok and just talk about this.”

The Cinderella actress posted a video captioned “I luv my body” to her TikTok on July 16 speaking to her 12 million followers about how she was “existing like a normal person” while photos were being taken of her.

“And I talk about in the video like, we’re real women and we have curves and we have cellulite and we have fat. And it’s just like a lot to just have these crazy, unrealistic standards that make us feel bad about ourselves and make us feel like in order to go out I have to hide my body or put on a big T-shirt,” Cabello explained to Corden. “It’s like, why should I have to do that? Why can’t I just like be me?”

By the next day, Cabello was made aware of the impact that the video had made.

“I got so many women coming up to me being like, ‘Woah, that so resonated with me,’” she shared. “These standards are ridiculous and so toxic. I just feel so much more confident now, honestly, after I posted that video because I feel like I just kind of controlled the narrative on it.”

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

Camila Cabello Trades Glass Slippers for Leather Thigh-High Boots at ‘Cinderella’ Premiere
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Camila Cabello at a red carpet event looking at the camera

By Claudia Miller, Yahoo! Life

Camila Cabello gave a whole new meaning to a princess gown at last night’s premiere of Amazon Studios’ “Cinderella.”

Taking the red carpet by storm at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, the film’s leading lady wowed in an edgier-than-expected look. The outfit credits come courtesy of celeb stylist duo Rob Zangardi and Mariel Haenn, who tapped Oscar de la Renta for Cabello’s wow-worthy evening dress.

The design featured a semi-sheer bodice coated in glittering metallic leafing with a contrasting black high-low puffed skirt.

To contrast the already edgy twist on Cinderella’s style, the “Havana” singer opted against glass slippers or classic pumps and instead broke out a sleek set of boots. The tall leather silhouette skimmed the musician’s thigh for an added level of boldness, all in a Casadei design.

Similar silhouettes from the footwear label clock in at almost 6 inches in heel height and retail for over $1,600 at Farfetch.

Knee-high and thigh-high boots are the must-have boot silhouettes this season. From leather twists on the trend to edgy lace-up styles, you can find the taller shoes on everyone from Ciara to Lily Collins and Gwen Stefani amongst other major names. In colder temperatures, the silhouettes offer coverage to counter skirts, dresses and shorts as well as provides an extra layer to any leggings or jeans look.

As for Camila Cabello’s own style, the Fifth Harmony alumna tends to include footwear styles from a wide range of brands — think everything from Converse to Naturalizer to Ivy Park x Adidas to Christian Louboutin. When it comes to red carpet duds, the former X-Factor star prefers designs from Zuhair Murad, Versace and Givenchy amongst other major labels.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life

How popular radio personality Geena the Latina realized her voice was powerful and necessary
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Greena the Latina or Geena Aguilar, known to radio listeners as Geena The Latina of the “The Geena the Latina and Frankie V Morning Show” on Channel 933, is the founder of the Girls Empowerment Conference. (Jarrod Valliere/The San Diego Union-Tribune)

LISA DEADERICK, The San Diego Tribune

It may come as a surprise that radio personality Geena the Latina — formally Geena Aguilar — never pictured herself on the air. If it wasn’t for a morning show audition 15 years ago that brought her to the city she considered a second home, San Diego might have missed out on one of the market’s more popular radio hosts.

While her path began as an intern at a Los Angeles radio station in college, she was working as a sales associate for a television station after college, when her two brothers were shot and killed within five months of each other.

“After that, I stopped working altogether for a year because I was so depressed. My old boss from the radio station called me after that year and told me to come back to the station. He said I could work as little or as much as I wanted. He just wanted to get me out of the house,” she says. “I am forever thankful to him for that.”

Aguilar threw herself into her work, befriending colleagues, working late hours and pitching in to help out and learn any aspect of the job that needed an extra pair of hands. Although she was initially resistant to the spotlight that came with the job, it’s helped her realize that her voice matters, and she’s used it to help others.

One of those ways is through her Girls Empowerment Conference with the Positive Movement Foundation. The foundation is a San Diego nonprofit that works with schools and other organizations to provide educational tools, empowerment events, and other resources to vulnerable children. They’re hosting their “Cocktails for a Cause” fundraiser 6 to 10 p.m. today at 1899 McKee St., San Diego. The Girls Empowerment Conference is one of the beneficiaries of the event.

Aguilar is an on-air personality at Channel 933, co-host of “The Geena the Latina and Frankie V Morning Show,” and lives in the East Village section of downtown San Diego. She took some time to talk about her radio career, the Girls Empowerment Conference, and finding her voice.

Q: Most of us who listen to the radio know you as Geena the Latina on Channel 93.3. What led you to choose a career in radio?

A: When I started out as an intern at 102.7 KIIS FM in Los Angeles during college, I was eventually hired in the promotions department, and continued working there throughout college. I never wanted to be on the air; I worked there because it was fun and all of my friends worked there. I always wanted to work in the entertainment industry, but I didn’t know exactly what I wanted to do. I thought of myself as more of a behind-the-scenes person.

[After the deaths of her brothers] I started working at the radio station again and completely threw myself into everything I could do there, probably just to keep myself busy. I’d stay at the station all day long, talking to people, helping whoever needed help, or sitting in on show meetings. I became the street reporter for the station and worked red carpet events, which eventually led to morning shows asking me to audition. I didn’t want to audition because I still didn’t think that being on the air could be a career, but one of those auditions was for a morning show in San Diego and I just loved San Diego. I grew up visiting the city, all of my friends had attended college here, and I’d already felt like San Diego was a second home. I got the job 15 years ago and I’ve been here ever since!

After being on Channel 933 for a year, I wanted to quit because I couldn’t handle all of the negative comments, messages, and emails. I hated the spotlight (and still don’t love it), but one morning, I shared the story about what happened to my brothers, and the response was overwhelmingly supportive. People were saying how much my story touched them, helped them, or how they related to me because of it. I finally realized that maybe I was supposed to be on the radio. If people listened to me when I had something serious to say, then I could put up with all of that other stuff. I realized that it was important to have a voice about things that mattered, and there was no bigger platform than on one of the biggest radio stations in San Diego, talking to a million people a week.

Q: Can you tell us about how you came to be known on air as “Geena the Latina,” and what it means to you to represent this part of your identity and culture?

A: When I first started, they were trying to think of a catchy name for me. At the time, there weren’t many Latinos on the radio, if any. They wanted a name that captured who I was, but also communicated that I was Latin. One day, one of the on-air DJs started calling me “Geena the Latina” and it stuck. I like the name, I think it defines who I am, and I am good with that. I am American first, of Latin descent, and my family is Mexican, but I was raised here in the U.S. We speak both English and Spanish, we grew up eating Mexican food and going to low-rider car shows, and my Spanish could be a lot better, but that’s also a product of us growing up with everything American. We grew up heavily immersed in the Mexican American culture, but also grew up very American. We’re an interesting mix of Latino that I feel represents a lot of people who were raised the same way, here in the U.S. We are proud of our Latin/Mexican roots and heritage, but are also proud to be American. I’m part of a generation that grew up with both cultures that shaped us to become who we are, and I’m proud of that.

What I love about downtown San Diego …
I love that it’s right in the middle of downtown San Diego and Little Italy. It’s a five-minute ride either way. Depending on what I feel like doing, everything is pretty accessible. I also love that I’m so close to North Park, as I frequent that neighborhood almost daily. I love having visitors and them being able to be so close to so much to do! Downtown, the harbor, Little Italy, Barrio Logan—I’m close to everything.

Q: Tell us about your Girls Empowerment Conference.

A: I’d been a keynote speaker at conferences for girls at both Mount Miguel High School and at the University of San Diego. After speaking at both conferences, I thought about combining them in order to maximize resources and to provide a massive conference for teen girls from all over San Diego. I spoke to the organizers of both conferences, and we started our Girls Empowerment Conference in 2017. The girls are provided with food throughout the day, along with empowering activities, speakers, performances, and interactive workshops.

During the smaller breakout sessions with a moderator, girls are able to comfortably talk about the issues affecting their lives, like body image, confidence, or life at home. Empowerment groups from different high schools perform spoken word and put together empowering videos that are played during the day. The girls from these high school empowerment groups are highly involved with everything from the topics of the conference to the themes, speakers, and more. We really try to hear them out and listen to what they say they want and need, as we plan the conference. It’s a fully interactive, immersive day, specifically geared to teen girls from ninth through 12th grades, and the costs of admission and transportation are covered at no cost to the girls.

Q: Why was this conference something you wanted to create?

A: We wanted to provide resources and outlets for teen girls who probably wouldn’t be able to have access to them otherwise. We wanted to uplift girls and give them examples of what they can become if they work hard and stay motivated. We wanted to provide a safe place for them to learn, grow, and have fun, and we ultimately wanted to inspire these girls to be the best that they can be. We wanted to allow them to see examples of others who were in their position once, and to see how far those women have come.

Q: What does the idea of “empowerment” mean to you, personally?

A: Empowerment is a state of being. It’s a state of feeling completely comfortable with who you are and what you believe in; of feeling confident that you can do whatever it is you want to do; of being confident in who you are and what you bring to the table; of knowing that your contribution to this world is important; and it’s a state of knowing that anything is achievable when you put your mind to it and dedicate yourself to making it happen. Empowerment gives you the feeling that nothing is unattainable.

Q: What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

A: Don’t take things personally. So many times, we won’t pursue our goals or dreams because someone told us we couldn’t, or because we got turned down or rejected. I think never taking things personally — whether it be a rejection or something said about us — allows us to not be hindered by things we can’t control. All you can do is be you, be a good person, work hard, and everything will happen as it’s supposed to happen.

Click here to read the full article on the San Diego Tribune.

Amara La Negra Wants to Encourage This Generation of Latinxs to Build Generational Wealth
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Amara La Negra wearing pink during a photoshoot

BJOHANNA FERREIRA, Popsugar

Amara La Negra is doing the most these days. Not only can we expect to see her in season four of Love & Hip Hop Miami, which returns on Monday, Aug. 23 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, but the Dominican-American artist who hails from Miami, FL, has been exploring quite a few new projects lately.

Many of us first learned about Amara in 2018 with her breakout role on the reality show. The singer not only drew us in with her musical sound — which includes a mix of R&B, hip-hop, and reggaeton influences — but she also won our hearts with her commitment toward advocating for Afro-Latinx communities and boldly speaking out against the lack of representation, colorism, and anti-blackness that still permeates Latinx culture. While her activism and music career still take center stage (she also recently started a podcast with iHeartRadio called Exactly Amara), this renaissance woman has added a new venture to her plate — real estate. After weeks of teasing us on Instagram about the news, she recently announced on Instagram the development of her new real estate business, Amara Residences, in the Dominican Republic. But Amara isn’t just trying to make business moves; she wants to inspire Latinas to build generational wealth.

Located in Las Terrenas in Samaná, Dominican Republic, Amara Residences features 48 apartments and 12 penthouses at the starting price of $175,200 for a two-bedroom, one-bath. Shortly after deciding to embark on real estate, she partnered with her real estate investor Allan Chavez of Soluciones Allan to develop Amara Residences. The two are not only business partners but have since become a romantic item — you can catch a sneak peek into their relationship on the new season of Love & Hip Hop Miami. Her mission behind it all is to build the generational wealth and financial stability the previous generations in her family couldn’t provide.

Investing in real estate and homeownership is one of the best ways to build generational wealth in this country. In fact, according to the National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals (NAHREP), more and more Latinxs are buying and investing in property with more than eight million Latinx new homeowners contributing $371 billion into that national gross domestic product. However, historical barriers still result in wide generational wealth gaps existing between Latinx and non-Latinx Black communities in the U.S. Not only are most Latinx and non-Latinx Black families less wealthy than typical white families but they are also less likely to own financial assets like homes. There are so many things that contribute to that from immigration status and low wages to historical legislation barriers like redlining and institutionalized racism. But this generation of Latinxs is understanding that in order to gain wealth for their families and generations to come, they need to educate themselves on financial literacy. They are understanding that financial literacy is crucial to our well-being. In order to truly be well, our finances need to be in order. Because struggling to pay the bills and being overwhelmed with debt isn’t at all good for our overall well-being.

Click here to read the full article on Popsugar.

Kassandra Garcia, the Latina fighting for representation in the NFL
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Kassandra Garcia, football management analyst for the Los Angeles Rams. Photo: LinkedIN

By Natalia Puertas Cavero, Aldia News

Kassandra Garcia is a first-generation Mexican-American who is making history in a male-dominated world. At just 27 years old, Garcia is the highest-ranking Latina in the NFL as a football management analyst for the Los Angeles Rams. She joins Natalia Dorantes, who was named the NFL’s first female chief of staff earlier this year.

The world of sports, even at the administrative level, is predominantly male. However, some Latinas, like Kassandra Garcia have arrived to diversify the industry.

Garcia’s rise began at the University of Arizona, where she pursued her degree in business administration and was a recruiting intern for the Wildcats. Her skills helped her become an analyst, and as she explained, the influence her family and culture played an important role in her career.

García atributes her accomplishments to her grandmother and mother, as they are the ones who gave her the strength to pursue her dreams. Garcia’s grandparents were second-generation Mexican-Americans, leaving Mexico with three children and no English.

Despite everything going against them, and with a lot of hard work, they managed to build thriving Mexican restaurants in Tuscon, Arizona. It was this example that inspired Garcia to build her own career.

She admits that becoming the highest-ranking Latina in the NFL didn’t happen by accident. Garcia has always been very rebellious and it has helped her pursue goals she thought impossible.

“I’m very stubborn. When someone tells me I can’t do something, it’s game over. The fire inside me burns to prove them wrong. I don’t know if that’s being stubborn, narcissism, ego — and I think about this all the time – but it’s gotten me this far,” García told USA Today Sports.

According to the NFL’s 2021 Diversity and Inclusion report, as of February 2021, there have only been four Latino (male) coaches. In addition, it noted that only 2.7% of all team vice presidents were women of color.

On the other hand, women in administrative positions in sports declined from 35.9% in 2019 to 32.3% in 2020, according to the Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sports (TIDES) of the DeVos Sports Management Program at UCF. Of those, only 7% of women in all professional management positions were non-white women.

It is inspiring and hopeful to see that women like Garcia are blazing a trail for other Latinas who dream of having a career on the business side of professional sports.

Click here to read the full article Aldia News.

Miss Teen Nebraska Latina, first to represent Peru in national competition
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Ferreyra is the first Miss Teen Nebraska Latina representing Peru in the Miss Teen U.S. Latina Pageant. She says she has spend hours and hours of practice, stepping over obstacles and breaking down stereotypes of the Latina community.

By Danielle Davis, 3 News Now

OMAHA, Neb. — “When I wear my crown and walk across the stage, I feel empowered,” said Alexa Ferreyra, Miss Teen Nebraska Latina.

Ferreyra is the first Miss Teen Nebraska Latina representing Peru in the Miss Teen U.S. Latina pageant. She says she has spent hours and hours of practice, stepping over obstacles and breaking down stereotypes of the Latin American community.

“At school I have honors. I am in the gifted program. This shows that when Latinas are given the opportunities they will thrive and achieve,” added Ferreyra.

This platform has given her the opportunity to make a difference in her passion project, which is stopping animal abuse and increase pet adoptions.

“Puppy mill animals are severely abused animals. These facilities that they come from, they don’t care about their mental and physical well-being. These animals are in a cage 24 hours and it is all about making money for them….never able to find homes after that,” she said.

She currently has seven kittens and two dogs.

Her mom, Dawn Ferreyra added, “She has grown so much from her platform. She is looking at careers where she can help the environment and help animals and I am just so proud that she has found her passion so early so that she can really succeed in life.”

An exciting part of the program is the cultural aspect.

“I just want to make my dad proud, he loves his culture and he has instilled that into me. The Peruvians in Nebraska are so proud of me, that I have this title and I am the first Peruvian. People just assume I am Mexican, when I say I am from Peru, they are like where is that?” explained Alexa.

Mom is there every step of the way, even giving advice to others looking to represent their heritage in pageants.

“Now, where diversity is both honored in the country and misunderstood, I think it is important for people to see all people represented in all aspects and have someone give back to their community, working hard both academically and serving others, it is important to see Latinas doing that kind of work,” said Dawn.

Alexa says she has learned what true beauty actually looks like.

“I think what people stand for is what makes them beautiful. I stand for animals, that is my cause and I think it is really important for someone to believe in something,” she said.

Crown or no crown, she says her hard work has already made her a winner.

“It’s not only for me but for them to feel represented. It would just feel amazing. We represent a small portion of Latinas in America but, we are here. We are strong and we are united,” Alexa said.

Click here to read the full article on 2 News Now.

One Step Back, Two Steps Forward — Letter from the Editor
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HISPANIC Network Magazine Fall 2021 Issue

Fall is a season heavily defined by visible transitions and change. As the earth prepares itself for winter, we get to witness a clear shift in the world around us.

Socially, I believe that is especially true this year. As our country continues to transition following the height, fall and resurgence of the COVID-19 pandemic, industries and society are looking forward to a future not defined by the struggles of the past (almost) year and half.

The Latino community, which was hit harder than almost any other, is especially taking the opportunity to move forward with renewed vigor and determination into the future. In this issue, we at Hispanic Network Magazine, are choosing to honor the changemakers of the community who share that vision.

We are also honored to showcase our Native American Special Issue as well.

Better education about and more prevalent representation of Native American and Alaska Native tribes and cultures has to become something we all fight for in our country, like our cover story actor Gil Birmingham.

Known for his iconic acting across multiple television programs as well as films, most notably his work in the hugely popular The Twilight Saga as Billy Black, a member of the Quileute tribe in La Push, Wash, he’s now mainly recognized for playing a very different character, Chief Thomas Rainwater, of the hit series Yellowstone.

Birmingham is a strong advocate for better representation of Native peoples in media and spreading discourse about their place in the American landscape. “I couldn’t be happier that there’s a Native American that’s portrayed in an educated and powerful way. That’s more realistic of what our community does have to offer,” he shared.

Read more about this longtime television and film icon on page 50.

Tawanah Reeves-Ligon
Tawanah Reeves-Ligon Editor, HISPANIC Network Magazine

Let’s also talk about the dangers of miseducation regarding Native American culture and its impact on American history after reading our interview with Cheryl Crazy Bull, president and CEO of the American Indian College Fund on page 88 as well as the “Power of Hispanic Inclusion in the Workplace” on page 42.

As part of our LGBTQ+ Special, read about Germain Arroyo, the gay, nonbinary actor changing the representation game in Hollywood on page 108.

For over a year, it feels like we have taken a step back in more ways than one, but there is still, and always will be, hope for the future. Let’s continue to walk together, hand-in-hand, as we choose to progress further with one another into a better tomorrow.

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