Here’s What Mexican Tequila Brands Really Think About Celebrity Tequilas
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Bottles from different brands of tequila on a table

By Rosie Bell, Fodors

For many years tequila has been a man’s game. Increasingly, it’s narrowing further to a non-Mexican celebrity’s enterprise. A-listers are converting their cult followings into tequila drinkers and causing ripple effects in the industry, which is now said to be worth US$10.8-billion-a-year.

These days you can sip on stylish agave drinks from the likes of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Elon Musk, P. Diddy, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Justin Timberlake, Nick Jonas, Michael Jordan, LeBron James, former James Bond actor Pierce Brosnan and Chris Noth (also known as “Mr. Big” from Sex and the City). Just a handful of women are on the celebrity tequila guest list including Canadian actress Shay Mitchell of Pretty Little Liars fame, sometimes-singer Rita Ora, and Kendall Jenner (who surely needs no introduction). More and more famous faces are cashing in on this protected centuries-old tradition, but what’s driving the boom, and what do Mexican women, who are traditionally sidelined in the industry, make of it?

What’s Behind the Gold Rush”
One brand is largely credited with triggering the celebrity tequila influx: Casamigos. Hollywood megastar George Clooney “accidentally” founded the drinks company with property tycoon Mike Meldman and Rande Gerber (his long-time friend and the husband of supermodel Cindy Crawford) in 2013. Just four years later, it was sold to drinks conglomerate Diageo for a whopping $1 billion, proving that there was serious money to be made from agave. The U.S. is now so head over heels for the legendary spirit that sales of full-proof tequila soared by almost 200 percent since 2002 according to the Distilled Spirits Council of the United States (DISCUS). In 2020, Mexico produced 60 million gallons of this liquid gold, which is 800 percent more than it did two decades ago.

George Clooney’s star quality might have certainly helped attract the glitterati. However, the female master distiller of Mexico’s top ultra-premium tequila cites the heightened focus on actual product quality from distillers for the drink’s rising popularity. Clase Azul is the Chanel of tequila brands and Viridiana Tinoco is the master distiller for all its products. “The tequila industry has changed and the work that is being put in behind the scenes to make the products incredible is part of the reason it’s growing exponentially,” she remarks. Gone are the days when you would take shots of unpalatable tequila just to get drunk. “Now you want to sip the tequila neat and simply enjoy it,” she adds.

Click here to read the full article on Fodors.

Maria ‘Chica’ Lopez Becomes the First Latina LBTQ+ Creator To Join Fortnite Icon Series
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Maria ‘Chica’ Lopez on a computer chair

By Yamily Habib, Be Latina

When we say Latinas are breaking through in every industry, we mean every industry. Just look at the outstanding achievement of Twitch streamer Maria “Chica” Lopez, who has joined the icon series of Epic Games‘ popular game, Fortnite.

As announced by the company, Chica’s icon set is now available in the item store and includes five different costume styles.

The icon set is one of 17 rarity types in Fortnite: Battle Royale. This rarity focuses on notable celebrities, artists, and influencers. The most notable inclusions are emotes (Twitch-specific emoticons that viewers and streamers use to express many feelings in chat) with copyrighted songs and other cosmetics based on streamers and artists.

Chica thus joins professional athletes such as LeBron James and Neymar Jr, pop star Ariana Grande, fellow streamer Kathleen “Loserfruit” Belsten, and others in the Icon Series, which immortalizes celebrities and high-profile content creators with skins and other cosmetics in Fortnite.

Maria “Chica” Lopez is an American Twitch streamer and professional eSports player known for her talent in multi-person shooter games like Fortnite.

Chica started gaming full-time during college and has since garnered over 2 million followers on Twitch, making her one of the most successful streamers on the platform. Maria has also become known for being one of the only prominent streamers to broadcast games in two different languages.

Chica has been a professional eSports player for several years. She first signed with TSM as their first player. Then she signed with DooM Clan and later joined Luminosity Gaming as a content creator and streamer.

Now, the young Latina breaks the glass ceiling and becomes the much-needed representation in the gaming world.

“I take a lot of pride in being not only a content creator but also in my identity as a Puerto Rican woman in the LGBTQIA+ community,” Chica said. “I wanted my Set in Fortnite to be true to who I am. I’ve been able to build such an awesome community within the Fortnite family, and I can’t wait to share my Set with everyone. I’m thrilled to be the first Latina to join the Icon Series.”

Click here to read the full article on Be Latina.

Kim Kardashian’s Skims casts singer Rosalía in new summer campaign – shop here
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Singer-songwriter Rosalía has been cast in Skims' first bilingual campaign. COURTESY PHOTO

By Melisha Kaur, Mirror

Spanish singer Rosalía has just been unveiled as the face of the latest campaign for SKIMS.

The billion-dollar brand, founded by Kim Kardashian, recently revealed its first ever bilingual campaign where content will be distributed in both Spanish and English.

The new campaign sees Rosalía donning pieces from the best-selling SKIMS cotton range, including the £36 Plunge Bralette, in a 15-second clip.

In a press release, brand owner Kim Kardashian said: “Rosalía’s willingness to push the boundaries and experiment with her music and personal style has been a huge inspiration for me. This campaign is all about the energy and confidence that she brings to the world.

“I’m especially excited that she’s wearing pieces from our best-selling Cotton Collection – they’re classic, cool and breathable everyday essentials that everyone feels good in.”

Rosalía added: “I love SKIMS. They are so comfy and make me feel very sexy at the same time. I’m so excited that I finally got the chance to collaborate, especially in their Cotton Collection which is my fave.”

This is the first ever fashion campaign for Rosalía, who released her third studio album Motomami back in March.

The new launch was shared by Kim Kardashian on social media, sending fans into a frenzy.

The series of stunning photos sees Rosalía wearing a black plunge bralette (£36) and matching cotton rib boxers (£32).

She’s also seen wearing a white cotton jersey T-shirt, £48, and a matching rib thong that costs £20.

The Grammy-winning singer also shared the launch to her 20.3 million Instagram followers.

“Damnnnnnn,” Kardashian commented, adding a trio of fire emojis.

The campaign comes after SKIMS dropped its new ‘Boyfriend’ collection, which saw the comeback of the brand’s signature unisex styles.

Click here to read the full article on Mirror.

Jose Galindez Aims to Help Hispanic Entrepreneurs Reach Financial Freedom
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CEO and motivational speaker Jose Galindez

By Digital Journal

CEO and motivational speaker Jose Galindez wants to form a community of like-minded Hispanic entrepreneurs and show them the path to success. In recent years, Hispanic-owned businesses have shown great promise when it comes to economic strides.

According to the Small Business Administration, there are an estimated 4.65 million Latino-owned businesses in the United States, making them the fastest-growing group of small businesses in the country, with a 34 percent increase in the last decade.

The SBA also cited the State of Latino Entrepreneurship 2020 report from the Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative. It revealed that Latinos are starting businesses at a quicker pace than the national average across almost all industries. Hispanic-owned employer enterprises also generated almost $500 billion in annual revenue and employed 3.4 million people before the epidemic.

They can reach greater heights by following Galindez’s program for financial freedom.

“Learn all my secrets and knowledge within the field of investments and financial management. Together, we will dominate each assault. With our strategies, we will go after the victory,” stated the motivational speaker.

José Galindez is the CEO of Galindez Capital Group, a company that offers education in various financial markets. He has a bachelor’s degree in marketing, a master’s degree in administration and a minor in military sciences. He is an inveterate dreamer, and he is passionate about investments, personal motivation and creativity. At an early age, he showed an interest in business and started as soon as he had the opportunity.

His steps in the financial markets begin in 2012 when he made his first investment in the stock market, and in 2017 he started investing in the cryptocurrency market. This latest venture pays dividends in 2021 when he finally becomes a seven-figure investor at the age of 29.

After 13 years, Galindez has developed various businesses with different models and resorts to sharing his knowledge on social media to benefit his audience. He has a YouTube channel where he shares knowledge on finance and all his business ventures ranging from restaurants to real estate.

He encourages Hispanic business owners to join his VIP Mentoring Group, where they can have access to the group’s Discord and establish relationships with other entrepreneurs. They will also have one live session per week, which is meant to cover any topic that interests them, including personal finance, real estate, credit cards, real estate investing, real estate sales, startup businesses, social media/YouTube growth, or whatever comes to mind. Finally, they have access to all recordings of previous sessions.

With his program, Galindez urges entrepreneurs to take control and master every step. He will be with them as they develop tools and strategies that solidify their executions.

Click here to read the full article on Digital Journal.

Camila Cabello stars in Victoria’s Secret’s first bilingual campaign: ‘I am honored’
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Camila Cabello wearing a white dress on the red carpet

By Kerry Justich, Yahoo! Life

Camila Cabello is the latest to team up with Victoria’s Secret.

The 25-year-old Cuban-American singer took to Instagram on Tuesday to share footage from her latest partnership with the brand for the Bombshell fragrance. Not only is she starring in an English version of the commercial, but also one in Spanish.

“I am honored to be the newest addition to the @victoriassecret Bombshell family 💖 and to be part of the brand’s first ever bilingual campaign!” she wrote. “Bombshell is about embracing who and what you are, and celebrating that every day.”

In the commercial, Cabello goes on to describe what the word bombshell means to her, explaining that it’s all about “owning your desires, your pleasures and enjoying everything life has to offer. Those things that make you feel great and make you feel joyful. Being who you are in every way.”

She later posted other photos from the campaign, sharing how empowered she felt to be a part of it. She even showed appreciation for not having her freckles airbrushed out of the final pictures.

“i loved this shoot !” she captioned one of three posts. “It’s rare that my lil sun freckles get to have their moment.”

Friends and fans of the singer took to the comment section to praise Cabello’s beauty.

“Linda,” singer Anitta wrote, while others called Cabello “gorgeous” and wrote “You ARE a bombshell.”

Supporters also shared that they were “proud” of Cabello for representing Latin women and Spanish speaking people in the brand’s first bilingual campaign. Some even expressed that they’d be willing to support Victoria’s Secret with Cabello’s stamp of approval.

“Influence,” one wrote. Another said, “I’m gonna try this brand cuz I trust you.”

While Victoria’s Secret has had a notable history of exclusionary practices and representation with its models, the brand has recently pivoted to become more inclusive. And although Cabello isn’t partnered on a lingerie campaign, it seems that the body positive singer is the latest to help with that mission.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

Bad Bunny Unveiled as New Marvel Hero ‘El Muerto’ for Sony Pictures
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bad bunny

By Matt Donnelly, Variety

Benito Antonio Martínez Ocasio, better known by his stage name Bad Bunny, has been cast as the newest Marvel hero in Sony Pictures’ portfolio of the super characters — and will lead the standalone comic book film “El Muerto.”

“El Muerto” is set to hit theaters on Jan. 12, 2024.

Introduced by Sony Motion Pictures Group president Sanford Panitch at CinemaCon, the annual gathering of movie theater owners in Las Vegas, Ocasio will be the first ever Latino actor to headline a live-action Marvel movie.

“To bring El Muerto to life is just incredible .. so exciting,” the chart-topping rapper told the crowd, adding that he grew up a fan of wrestling.

Known as Juan-Carlos Estrada Sanchez in the comics, El Muerto is a wrestler whose powers are handed down by ancestry in the form of a mask (which, according to Marvel’s official site, gives him superhuman strength). In past comic narratives, El Muerto has gotten in the ring with Spider-Man himself. On stage at CinemaCon, Sony brass suggested Ocasio will portray an antihero on the verge of inheriting his father’s power.

Sony’s adaptive Marvel rights have yielded three Spider-Man iterations over 20 years, with the current Tom Holland-led series most recently enjoying a massive hit in “Spider-Man: No Way Home.” Additional franchises include Tom Hardy and Michelle Williams’ “Venom,” Jared Leto’s “Morbius” and the Oscar-winning animated film “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” A sequel to the latter was just pushed from a December 2022 release to June 2023.

Upcoming Sony Marvel projects include: the anticipated “Madame Web,” a female-led adventure starring Dakota Johnson, which is due in theaters on July 7, 2023; and the imminent “Kraven the Hunter,” led by “Nocturnal Animals” star Aaron Taylor-Johnson, which hits theaters on January 13, 2023.

Click here to read the full article on Variety.

This Small, Woman-Owned Business Shares The Magic Of Mexican Coffee
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Lupita Sanchez, owner of Café Metzli, talks about all the love, labor and heritage that goes into the harvesting and processing of these special Mexican coffee beans.

By Tessa Flores, HuffPost

For Lupita Sanchez, creator and owner of Café Metzli, a single cup of coffee has the ability to sustain cultures, generational traditions and entire communities.

Her company’s coffee beans are a direct result of the small-scale coffee ecosystems that happened to be thriving in her very own backyard.

“It’s not really known that there’s Mexican specialty coffee,” Sanchez told HuffPost. “Everyone knows about coffee from Colombia or Ethiopia, and even growing up in Mexico we always just had Starbucks or instant coffee.”

After moving to Los Angeles in 2019 to be with her husband, Sanchez found a similar lack about awareness for Mexican coffee among the local artisan coffee shops and grocery stores she frequented.

Her subsequent quest to carve out a space in the market for quality Mexican coffee, while also connecting with her heritage, started in 2021 and led her into the mountainous highlands of the Chiapas region of Mexico. The small town of Bella Vista, which is close to the Guatemalan border and home to several ancient sites of the Mayas, is self-run by small-scale coffee producers, many of which are made up of entire families and individuals native to the land.

“I started doing my research and began connecting with different coffee producers from different parts of Mexico,” Sanchez said. “I traveled back to where they grow the coffee so I can start from the beginning and really get to know what the whole process of making coffee beans was like. That’s when I just fell in love with it.”

She chose Bella Vista partly because of delicious flavors that the climate, mineral-rich soil and altitude brought out in the beans. Café Metzli’s signature Bella Vista Women’s Group blend comes in three different roasts and highlight a variety of flavors, including baked apple, vanilla, dark chocolate and black cherry.

But she was also drawn to the collective of 168 women coffee producers who lived there.

“My country can have a very ‘machismo’ mentality, and just seeing these women working on their own, building their own companies, collaborating as a group and keeping their families together is amazing,” Sanchez said. “I feel so proud that I can help women achieve their goals, just how I’m achieving my own goals.”

“[Many of these groups] have amazing coffee programs that teach the youth how to plant the coffee they produce, how to do latte art and coffee cupping so that they can find love in their culture and their land and what they have there,” she said. “They don’t have to immigrate somewhere else and leave their families behind.”

Click here to read the full article on HuffPost.

Latina-owned business receives grant from Eva Longoria Foundation
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Eva Longoria speaking in front of a zoom camera giving her speech for the Critics Choice Awards

By Roxana Becerril, San Diego Tribune

From being an Uber driver to becoming a business owner, Mirna Guardiola is one of the 4.65 million Latino business owners in the U.S. to prove they can achieve more than most could imagine.

As the fastest-growing segment of U.S. small businesses, Latino-owned companies are taking the lead in terms of revenue, according to Forbes late last year.

Their funding, however, not so much.

From 2020 to 2021, the funding rate for Latino-owned businesses was 34.5% in comparison to that of non-Latino-owned companies, which was 36.6%.

Luckily for Latino entrepreneurs, the Eva Longoria Foundation recently partnered with nonprofit microlender Accessity to award $10,000 worth of grants to 12 Latina-owned businesses.

Among the recipients: Guardiola’s handbag business, Mujer Brave.

A mother of three, Guardiola emigrated from Culiacán, Sinaloa, to San Diego, with beginner-level English and very little experience in accounting. After her divorce, she was motivated to provide for her family and worked as a driver for Uber and Lyft.

The COVID-19 pandemic hit in 2020, and Guardiola’s driver job was put on hold, leading her to discover the Spanish-language Accessity Academy for Business Success program.

After the 10-week program, Guardiola was equipped with the necessary tools to launch her own business despite the ongoing pandemic and in June 2020, it became a reality.

She combined her entrepreneurial efforts with merchandise she sold on Facebook Marketplace and at the Swap Meet as a hobby, and she started Mujer Brave mid-pandemic.

Operating from her home in San Ysidro with merchandise from artisans in Mexico, Guardiola sells handbags online and at some in-person events. She still drives for Uber and Lyft, but now counts on her business not only as an additional stream of income but as a source of motivation for other women like her.

She says her company is meant to “inspire other women to never give up,” hence the name of her business, which translates to “brave woman.”

Giving thanks to Accessity is not enough to show appreciation for the program and support she received there, she said.

“They believed in me as a woman entrepreneur and I am very grateful,” Guardiola said. “Their support is worth more than the money I have earned.”

Guardiola will be using the $1,000 grant she received from Accessity to fund marketing and social media campaigns. According to Accessity, the grant recipients, who all graduated from its success program, were chosen based on their application and if their business is currently in operation and demonstrates “resilience, resourcefulness and growth.”

Click here to read the full article on San Diego Tribune.

Preserving Culture & Heritage Through STEM Programming
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four young american indian women in a college witht he AICF logo in the middle

by Tawanah Reeves-Ligon

Unfortunately, despite representing about two percent of the population, Native Americans and Alaska Natives only make up about half of a percent of U.S. STEM careers according to one study. In order to combat this disparity, organizations like the American Indian College Fund seek to build programming and support ventures that offer greater access to education, support and resources necessary for students to grow and expand their career and networking opportunities.

One such program, the Indigenous Visionaries Native Women Leadership Fellowship Program, has been working to support Native women students for years. Diversity in STEAM Magazine was excited to interview the American Indian College Fund about this program and how it became the remarkable resource it is today for Native students and communities.

Diversity in STEAM Magazine (DISM): How did the Indigenous Visionaries Program come into existence?

American Indian College Fund (AICF): The College Fund has provided women’s leadership programming since 2010. The Indigenous Visionaries program emerged out of foundational programming in women’s leadership in 2017. From 2017 to 2021, four TCUs (Tribal Colleges and Universities) and 15 fellows participated in the Indigenous Visionaries program. The first iteration focused on arts, early childhood education and environmental science. In 2021, the American Indian College Fund (College Fund) launched the second iteration of Indigenous Visionaries. Key changes to the new iteration include expansion of eligibility to all 35 TCUs and the opportunity to focus their community-based project on a topic and field of study of their choosing.

DISM: What is its goal and mission?

AICF: The Indigenous Visionaries Native Women Leadership Fellowship Program at the College Fund supports the empowerment and success of Native women students at TCUs through a year-long fellowship opportunity. Participants receive place-based and experiential, professional and personal development through guided training and cultural learning from their mentors, College Fund staff and a broad network of Native women leaders. This program seeks to address and dismantle systemic barriers facing Native women by providing the tools, opportunities and a network to support and strengthen the growth of our fellows; in turn strengthening families, TCUs and Tribal Communities. This space will elevate and increase the visibility of Native women by offering strategic opportunities that illuminate a path towards personal, educational, professional advancement and degree attainment.

DISM: How do candidates apply or get nominated? What are the requirements?

AICF: As the Indigenous Visionaries fellows are paired with a woman mentor at their TCU, in many instances, mentors choose a student they would like to work with in this program. We’ve also seen students recruit mentors, and TCU Presidents recommend mentors and fellows to apply.

To apply for this fellowship opportunity, the TCU Applicant must meet the following eligibility requirements:

  • Be a current and full member of the American Indian Higher Education Consortium.
  • Have an identified Mentor and Fellow that will actively engage in their community-based project implementation and fellowship opportunities.
  • Fellows and Mentors must live within the community served by their TCU.
  • Mentors are an established woman faculty or staff member (such as a program director, grant manager, archivist, etc.) at a TCU.
  • Fellows are undergraduate students enrolled full-time at an eligible TCU and have completed at least one semester.
  • Applicants are at TCUs that support the advancement and leadership of Native women:
    • Maintain a commitment to active participation in fellowship activities.
    • Prepared to report and share impact for evaluation purposes.

DISM: What do you look for in a project, and is there a specific scope it has to cover?

AICF: Mentors and fellows will work together throughout the fellowship term to strengthen personal, professional and academic skills that will enhance their leadership within their communities. This includes working together on a project that serves the community.

Applicants provide a summary of their community-based project and include a description of the following:

  • Strategies for project planning,
  • identify roles and responsibilities,
  • implementation and what you hope to learn from this project.

They also describe how they will incorporate Native language and culture bearers into their community-based project.

PICTURED ABOVE:

Top Left:
Caption/Credit: Sasha Sillitti/American Indian College Fund

Sasha Sillitti (Three Affiliated Tribes- the Mandan (Nueta), Hidatsa and Arikara (Sahnish)) is a business administration student at Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota. Sillitti also works as a student accounts counselor and accounts receivable manager at the college. Her project is to develop a recycling program. She will create a more efficient method of collecting and transporting recyclables, building community relationships, and increasing community awareness about recycling as a form of land stewardship. The Fort Berthold reservation does not have a recycling program, and the nearest drop-off for materials is 150 miles away. Pansy Goodall (Arikara of the Fort Berthold Reservation), the Business Faculty Department Chair, will serve as a mentor.

Top Right:
Caption/Credit: Harley-Daniel Interpreter/American Indian College Fund
Harley-Daniel Interpreter (Navajo)
is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in psychology at Diné College on the Navajo Reservation while working as the social media engagement agent in the Office of the President. Interpreter will conduct a voter outreach and education project to expand voter education, advocate for timely communication about voting, and ensure support of access to voting across the Navajo Nation during the midterm election. Crystal Cree (Navajo), director of the Office of Legislative Affairs and Policy at Diné College, will serve as a mentor.

Bottom Left:
Caption/Credit: Louise K. Waakaa’igan/American Indian College Fund

Louise K. Waakaa’igan (Anishinaabe) is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in human services at Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College in Hayward, Wis., while working at the college as the advancement coordinator. In collaboration with her mentor, she will create a “Kwe Book,” a history of women leaders and founders at the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College. Waakaa’igan will catalog their interviews and stories throughout the project for future generations. Faith Smith (Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Ojibwe), a curator for the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe, will serve as a mentor.

Bottom Right:
Caption/Credit: ArriAnna Henry/American Indian College Fund

ArriAnna Henry (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Bitterroot Salish) is pursuing a bachelor’s degree in social work and a certification of completion in intensive Salish language at Salish Kootenai College on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Pablo, Mo. She holds an associate degree in chemical dependency counseling and is an All Nations Health Center intern working in the Behavioral Health Department. Henry’s project is the Paddle for Life wellness project. Young adult community members will participate in immersive Salish language lessons while crafting their own cedar canoe paddle to create both cultural and physical wellness. Rosemary Matt (Salish), the Native Language Teacher Education Department Head, will serve as a mentor.

We’re looking forward to learning more about these exceptional scholars and the projects they’ve developed to serve their communities. For more information about the American Indian College Fund and the Indigenous Visionaries Native Women Leadership Fellowship Program, visit collegefund.org.

Source: American Indian College Fund

The Weather Channel En Español Makes Its Debut
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L to R: Abel Hernández, Milmar Ramírez, Henry Golac, Jessica Fernández and Lorena Lim and Albert ... [+] THE WEATHER CHANNEL

By Veronica Villafañe, Forbes

After a two-year pandemic delay and months of planning, the Weather Channel en Español launches today at 7 am ET. The first 24/7 U.S. Spanish-language free streaming weather news network makes its debut on the 40th anniversary of the launch of The Weather Channel television network, both part of Byron Allen’s Allen Media Group broadcast portfolio.

Featuring regional, local newscasts and content focused on the U.S., the Caribbean and Latin America, the Weather Channel en Español will be available across over-the-top streaming platforms, mobile devices and via The Weather Channel app.

“The Hispanic marketplace is indexing extremely well with streaming services and is severely underserved,” says Byron Allen, founder, chairman and CEO of Allen Media Group. “Our launch of The Weather Channel en Español is historic, and is a recognition of the continued and significant growth of the U.S. Hispanic population and the constant need to keep the entire public informed and safe as multibillion dollar weather disasters are on the rise – especially in communities where Spanish is spoken as both the primary and secondary language in millions of households throughout America.”

The Weather Channel en Español has its own production team and on-air talent, but will also tap the resources of TWC, including its immersive mixed reality (IMR) technology. It will also collaborate with other Allen Media Group platforms such as Pattrn, TWC’s climate, environment and sustainability network.

Click here to read the full article on Forbes.

4 Tips to Help Latina Business Owners Achieve Success
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Stock image of Latina Business owners standing outside of a cafe

By Jenny Flores, Cision PR Newswire

As we celebrate Hispanic Heritage month this year, it’s a good time to recognize the many contributions of Hispanic small business owners. And there truly are many. Wells Fargo served as lead sponsor of the Latino Donor Collaborative’s U.S. Latino GDP Report, which tracks the growing influence of the Latino community within the U.S. economy, and the results are incredibly promising. Latinos contributed $2.7 trillion to the U.S. GDP in 2021, equivalent to the seventh largest economy in the world, and they’re growing 57% faster than the U.S. economy overall. From 2010 to 2019, the U.S. Latino GDP was the third-fastest growing among the 10 largest GDPs in the world, with the U.S. economy ranking fourth. Latinos are also accounting for 68% of the growth in U.S. labor participation. These figures are due, in large part, to Latina business owners. In fact, as of 2019, Latina women owned 18% of all women-owned businesses1, and between 2014 and 2019, Latina-owned firms grew 40%.2 These are significant numbers and show the impact Latina business owners are making on the country’s overall economy.

But we all know, small business owners have continued to struggle to stay open given the pandemic’s repercussions and continuous fluctuations. While the statistics surrounding Latina-led companies are sobering – twice as many Latina-owned companies experienced closure during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to their male counterparts (30% vs. 16%)3 – the below tips can help aspiring Latina entrepreneurs stay on a path to success.

Develop a business plan
Having a good idea is NOT enough! Developing a business plan* is the first key step for any business owner. An effective plan can help you prioritize how to spend your time and money, and set measurable goals. It also can help identify current or future obstacles so you can better anticipate and avoid potential risks. For example, with COVID-19 impacts, you may have had to create more online offerings or enhance your digital presence for your business. Some of you may have had to change relationships with supply chains and vendors or reduce hiring. Whatever it was, now’s the time for you to review how you’ve adapted to the current situation, which of these adaptions you want to build upon in the future, and then document it in your plan.

Get mentorship support
Latinos are increasingly in advantageous positions to start their own businesses—they’re younger, with higher educational attainment: Nearly 90% of Latino Post-Millennials are high school graduates. They’re contributing to the labor force in greater numbers, buying more homes, and closing the wealth gap at a rapid rate. But the past year and a half has reinforced what we’ve always known: It takes a village. As women business owners continue to climb out of the pandemic impacts, and build from survivability toward recovery and opportunity, connecting with mentors and other experts is one of the most powerful and greatest ways to exchange knowledge, share best practices, and learn from each other. Wells Fargo recently partnered with the Nasdaq Entrepreneurial Center where women entrepreneurs can gain complementary support through its signature Milestone Mapping Coaching Circles*, a 12-week long mentorship program to help them overcome key business challenges while developing a peer support network and connection to mentors. Women business owners who are interested may apply to participate, and upon acceptance, will be placed in a circle.

Click here to read the full article on Cision PR Newswire.

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Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fair
    January 19, 2022 - November 4, 2022
  2. The Small Business Expo–Multiple Event Dates
    February 17, 2022 - December 1, 2022
  3. USPAACC’s CelebrASIAN Business + Procurement Conference 2022
    May 25, 2022 - May 27, 2022
  4. From Day One
    June 14, 2022
  5. 2022 Airport Minority Business Development Conference (AMAC) Annual Conference
    June 20, 2022 - June 23, 2022
  6. From Day One
    June 22, 2022
  7. UNIDOS US Annual Conference & Latinx Inclusion Summit
    July 9, 2022 - July 11, 2022
  8. Business Beyond Barriers Conference + Expo
    July 14, 2022 @ 8:00 am - 3:00 pm
  9. 2022 LULAC National convention
    July 25, 2022 - July 30, 2022
  10. CHCI’s 2022 Leadership Conference & Gala
    September 13, 2022 - September 15, 2022