For Many Afro-Latinas, Rosie Perez Is the Hollywood Blueprint
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Rosie Perez young and in a black and white photo with a colorful background

By Janel Martinez, POPSUGAR

When Billy Hoyle — a white basketball player with a sick jump shot in 1992’s “White Men Can’t Jump” — gets hustled by his teammate Sidney Deane, Billy’s girlfriend springs into action. Heading straight to Sidney’s house, Gloria, played by Rosie Perez, makes an agreement with Sidney’s wife, Rhonda. As the two women block the TV to announce the terms of their deal, one of the guys yells for someone to tell them to move.

Sidney responds, “Why don’t you tell them to move? Them Black women over there, you think I’m crazy?”

The Puerto Rican actress, dancer, and choreographer is one of the women referenced in the subtle-yet-affirming scene. While the words are likely to get lost in the film’s overall plot, it was an acknowledgement of Perez’s identity: a light-skinned Black woman. In her 2014 memoir, “Handbook for an Unpredictable Life: How I Survived Sister Renata And My Crazy Mother and Still Came Out Smiling (With Great Hair),” Perez shared that the role of Gloria was originally intended for an Italian or Irish American actor.

“It’s an important affirmation because it sends the message that, one: Black people are global; we come in various shades and exist all over the world,” journalist and TV/film critic Kathia Woods tells POPSUGAR of the scene. “Two: Latinos include people of various races and ethnicities, one of which is Black.”

For many Afro-Latinas, Perez’s earliest appearances on the silver screen marked an integral acknowledgment of their existence in the mainstream.

The Brooklyn-born performer caught the world’s attention in Spike Lee’s 1989 film “Do The Right Thing.” During the opening credits, Perez delivers an unforgettable dance sequence: pumping, kicking, hopping and spinning over Public Enemy’s “Fight The Power.” Her fierce expression and electrifying moves made cinematic history; she left a mark that many — especially Afro-Latinas — would never forget.

“It was the first time that I had seen someone that looked like me, people in my family, on screen moving their body in a way that we normally move when we dance, not in a way that we see in the media, on that big of a platform,” says Crystal Shaniece Roman, CEO and founder of The Black Latina Movement. “It was like, she’s one of us and she’s representing us.”

Throughout her now 30-plus year career, Perez has consistently been her authentic self, no matter the audition. In 1993, she appeared on the “Late Show with David Letterman” donning her soft curls, large hoops, low-cut ‘fits that accentuated her figure and, of course, her one-of-a-kind Nuyorican accent. Though she’s noted that she has enjoyed her interviews with Letterman, some portions are hard to watch as the former TV host teases the Afro-Boricua actress, pinpointing her outfit of choice and mannerisms like her “hard” laugh. Even under the spotlight of a coveted late-night TV appearance, she couldn’t escape being typecast.

Luckily, there was already a space where Perez’s demeanor was more familiar: Black television. She was frequenting the club scene when a talent scout for “Soul Train” invited her to dance on the groundbreaking show at 19. While balancing several jobs and studying biochemistry in Los Angeles, she became “Soul Train”‘s “It girl.” “Rosie came on the show, and she was just so hot and so sexy. That girl could dance. She could move,” said fellow “Soul Train” dancer Crystal McCarey in Nelson George’s book, “The Hippest Trip in America: Soul Train and the Evolution of Culture and Style.”

Melissa M. Valle, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Sociology and Anthropology and African American and African Studies departments at Rutgers University-Newark, witnessed Perez on-screen in the ’90s. She recognizes how complicated a role the actress straddled in the public eye: the thin line between representation and pigeonholing was everpresent.

“[Rosie] embodies an experience, a human experience, and it’s a cultural experience that does need to be put out there,” says Valle. “But we also know this is where representation becomes a little bit complicated in that they want her to be that [one thing]. That’s what they came for. That’s what they’re entertained by.”

“Soul Train” furthered the star’s professional dance career. Perez choreographed the music videos for Bobby Brown’s “Don’t Be Cruel” and “My Prerogative” and later worked with the likes of Heavy D & The Boyz, Diana Ross, and LL Cool J. After she met Keenen Ivory Wayans at one of Eddie Murphy’s house parties (a story she tells in her book), Perez became the three-time Emmy-nominated choreographer for “In Living Color’s” Fly Girls. As she booked performers, curated the music, and choreographed eight routines per week, Perez discovered and advocated for new talent like Jennifer Lopez and Queen Latifah. The famed sketch-comedy show wasn’t the only venture that would lead to widespread recognition for her; the Dec 1993/Jan 1994 “Vibe” cover girl also earned an Oscar nomination for her performance in 1993’s “Fearless.”

By the 2000s, Perez’s impact would also be felt amongst her people as an activist for Puerto Rican rights; she was arrested in 2000 after protesting against US bomb ranges in Vieques. Her career would continue to blossom as well — she went on to star on Broadway and in a number of movies and TV shows, and cohosted the popular daytime program “The View.” Still today, Afro-Latinas are far from getting their just due. “I’ve seen change, but it’s not what it should be,” Perez said in a 2020 “New York Times” interview on Latinx representation in Hollywood.

Click here to read the full article on POPSUGAR.

7 Latina-Owned Secondhand Shops That Promote Sustainability
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7 Latina-Owned Secondhand Shops That Promote Sustainability

By Tess Garcia, Refinery 29

Like many immigrants, Latines have a complicated history with secondhand shopping. Some of us grew up parsing through thrift stores out of necessity. Others were raised to avoid them at all costs, viewing shiny, new things as symbols of success. In recent years, an alternative school of thought has emerged from both ends of the spectrum: more and more, Latine shoppers of all class backgrounds are embracing pre-owned clothing for its prices as well as sustainability and style points.

“Growing up first-generation in a super white community, I couldn’t comfortably sit in one group or the other. I used clothes to express myself,” Mexican-American Isabel Robles tells Refinery29 Somos. Upon entering her teen years, this meant exploring the once-taboo worlds of thrift and consignment stores. “As I grew up, I grew more comfortable with my individuality, and shopping vintage and secondhand gave me the opportunity to pull pieces and style myself differently from everyone else.”

Others, like Moises Mendez II, shop secondhand as a way to honor their elders’ values. “My mom, who is from the Dominican Republic, is the biggest believer in ‘if you can get it for cheaper, why not?’ She also does her best to be environmentally conscious,” he explains. “Because I saw those two things growing up, they’ve been instilled in me, and I feel like I’m fulfilling them by shopping secondhand.”

No matter your motives for buying secondhand, it’s also a great way to support Latine entrepreneurs. Below, we’ve rounded up seven Latina-owned vintage and thrift stores that will change the way you shop. Keep reading to learn how each founder got their start, how they feel about sustainable shopping trends, and more.

The Plus Bus — Los Angeles, California

Co-Founded by Marcy Guevara-Prete

Image from The Plus Bus vintage store
Origin Story: “My business partner and I had so many clothes. Not only did we want those clothes to go to other happy homes, but we wanted a place to come and actually have a shopping experience in person. It’s so stressful and feels like such a disparity that the amount of options for our straight-size counterparts are just so abundant, yet there’s just nothing for plus-size shoppers. But we have money to spend, places to go, people to see.”
On Sustainability & Personal Growth: “When we started the store, sustainability was not on my radar. But it has become so important to me and such a central part of our business. Not only do we know fashion is a huge polluter of the planet, but I care about my wallet, I care about investing in brands that do care and are trying to be ethical. I really try to shop out of The Plus Bus, and I’ve been able to do that successfully for almost three years now.”

Current Boutique — Washington, DC

Founded by Carmen Lopez

Image from Current Boutique vintage store
Origin Story: “Growing up, my mother and I would visit la segunda for treasures every weekend. I saw an opening in the market to make consignment shopping cool, modern, and on-trend. At 28 years old, I saved enough money to launch my business, Current Boutique. My parents, especially my father, didn’t support my decision. No one in our family worked for themselves, definitely not a woman. I started with a lease on a small brick-and-mortar storefront and grew it to three. Now, it’s evolved into a national e-commerce consignment website.”
On Attention to Detail: “I was brought up to know that everything has value and I should cherish my belongings to make them last. We tell our customers to bring us natural fabric items made from cashmere, silk, linen, and cotton. Not only do they hold their value, but their new owners will get repeat uses, which is the key to circular fashion.”

Poorly Curated — New York City

Founded by Jamie Espino

Image from Poorly Curated Vintage Store.
Origin Story: “As a kid, my Tata would take me thrifting. We’d go thrifting and we’d go to lunch. After college, I started applying to jobs at bigger fashion companies, but then I realized none of these places shared my beliefs. The more I thought about how I’d be spending my time, the more I was like, ‘I should just try to do vintage full time.’ Now, it’s about to be six years. I love what I’m doing with Poorly Curated.”
On the Cost of Fast Fashion: “At the end of the day, vintage is a very sustainable way of shopping, especially compared to disposable fashion, which is mostly made by people of color who aren’t getting paid fair wages. Why would I want to contribute to people who look like me not getting paid fairly? Also, when it comes to climate change, it’s always poor communities of color that tend to be affected. Why would I do that to myself, essentially?”

Fresa Thrift — Denton, Texas

Founded by Anisa Gutierrez

Image from Fresa Thrift Vintage Store
Origin Story: “Before the Covid-19 pandemic, I opened my store, Fresa Thrift, but during the lockdown, I decided to quit my full-time job and just jump into the store full time. It was a combination of what I loved and needing to love myself.”
On Owning a Business: “I’ve always had a boss, so it’s hard for me to see myself as my own boss. As a Latina in the workplace, I was the one who said, ‘I’m going to put my head down and work.’ I wasn’t around a lot of people who looked like me, and I wasn’t going to give them a reason to look down on me. For my mother and my grandmother, starting a business was never an option or a thought. For me to do it and have them say, ‘You make it look so easy,’ it’s nice to hear. It makes me wonder: What would their small businesses have been?

Debutante Vintage Clothing — Pomona, California

Founded by Sandra Mendoza

Image from Debutante Vintage Clothing
Origin Story: “I had amassed so much vintage for myself to wear that I had to start selling some of it. In 1998, I started flipping things on eBay and realized, ‘Wow, I can make some money.’ Eventually, it grew into my business, Debutante Vintage Clothing.”
On Generational Shifts: “When I first started my business, my parents were like, ‘Eso trapos viejos, ¿vas a vender?’ It’s only been this year — and I’ve been in business since 2005 — when I showed them my shop, and they were like, ‘Oh, it’s nice here. It’s organized.’ As immigrants, they wanted everything brand new and shiny. I’m so proud that younger people are embracing secondhand and even mending and repurposing. As a business owner, inventory has become a lot harder to source [laughs]. But as a social movement, I’m so happy.”

Click here to read the full article on Refinery 29.

Juan Toscano-Anderson Becomes First Player of Mexican Descent to Win NBA Title
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Juan Toscano-Anderson Becomes First Player of Mexican Descent to Win NBA Title

By Kiko Martinez, Remezcla

Golden State Warriors forward Juan Toscano-Anderson has become the first player of Mexican descent to win an NBA championship.

The 27-year-old Oakland native won the title with his hometown team Thursday night (June 16). The Warriors beat the Boston Celtics in Game 6 of the NBA Finals 103-90 to win the series 4-2.

During the trophy presentation ceremony, Juan Toscano-Anderson held the Mexican flag proudly after the coveted Larry O’Brien championship trophy was handed to the team’s owners. This year’s championship marks the fourth one in eight years that the Warriors have won. In those eight years, the Warriors have been to the NBA Finals six times.

Later, Toscano-Anderson can be seen chanting “MVP” from the stage when his teammate Stephen Curry was named Most Valuable Player of the NBA Finals for the first time in his career.

“Everybody on this stage has a part in this – from the front office, coaches, players,” Curry said.

Toscano-Anderson’s road to an NBA Championship was a challenging one. He played four years for Marquette University before going undrafted in the 2015 NBA Draft. He then started playing professional basketball in Mexico’s Liga Nacional de Baloncesto Profesional. He also played in the Liga Profesional de Baloncesto in Venezuela and for the Santa Cruz Warriors in the NBA’s G League.

In February 2020, Toscano-Anderson was signed by the Warriors for three years. His deal was converted to a full-time contract in May 2021. Earlier this year, he participated in the 2022 NBA Slam Dunk Contest at the All-Star Game wearing a pair of customized Nike tennis shoes designed to look like the Mexican flag.

Click here to read the full article on Remezcla.

Jennifer Lopez Wants to Give Latina Entrepreneurs the Capital Boost They Need
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Jennifer Lopez Wants to Give Latina Entrepreneurs the Capital Boost They Need

By  Yamily Habib, Be Latina

We have often talked about the economic strength of the Latino community — especially Latinas. We are not only one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups but also the ones who have jump-started the nation’s economy before and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

However, one of the biggest obstacles for entrepreneurs and business owners is access to resources and start-up capital.

This reality is so evident that big names like Jennifer Lopez have stepped up to the plate to address it.

The singer announced that she has joined forces with microfinance organization Grameen America to give Latina entrepreneurs the capital boost they need, adding up to $14 billion in capital.

As reported by Forbes, Jennifer Lopez announced Thursday that, as a national ambassador for Grameen, she will help mentor the organization’s network of more than 150,000 women-led small businesses in Latino communities across the country.

Together with Grameen, a nonprofit that provides access to capital, credit building, and financial education, Lopez will reinvigorate her philanthropic project, Limitless Labs, to provide 600,000 Latina entrepreneurs with $14 billion in loan capital and 6 million hours of financial education by 2030.

By joining Grameen’s microloan program, Jennifer Lopez will “motivate, promote, and inspire” Latina business owners and educate them on credit and asset-building to help them “understand the pathway to financial independence and literacy,” according to Grameen.

The partnership will build “pathways to employment and leadership opportunities” to harness the “strength” of the Latinx community, Lopez said in a statement.

“Being Latino in this country has always been a matter of pride for me. I am humbled and beyond grateful to partner with Grameen America. We’re building pathways to employment and leadership opportunities. There’s so much strength in this community, and we’re harnessing that. This partnership will create equality, inclusivity, and opportunity for Latina women in business,” she added.

She also told Inc. that her mother did not go to college because she did not have that access, but through this new partnership, Jennifer Lopez hopes to create a more equitable and inclusive landscape.

Click here to read the full article on Be Latina.

Daniel Suárez grabs historic NASCAR Cup Series win at Sonoma
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Daniel Suarez celebrates his victory in a NASCAR Cup Series auto race, Sunday, June 12, 2022, at Sonoma Raceway in Sonoma, California. (P Photo/D. Ross Cameron)

By Greg Beacham, ABC 7

Daniel Suárez became the first Mexican-born driver to win a NASCAR Cup Series race Sunday, holding off Chris Buescher for a historic victory at Sonoma Raceway.

Suárez, a 30-year-old native of Monterrey, finally won in the 195th career start of a Cup Series career that began in 2017. He also drove his Trackhouse Racing Chevrolet to the third Cup Series victory of the season for this rising 2-year-old team co-owned by former driver Justin Marks and music star Pitbull.

Suárez got past Buescher and took charge early in the final stage on this hilly road course in Northern California wine country, and he persevered through a pit stop and a caution to emerge in front with 23 laps to go. Buescher pushed him aggressively, but Suárez made no significant mistakes while rolling to victory.

“It’s crazy,” Suárez said. “I have so many thoughts in my head right now. It’s been a rough journey in the Cup Series, and these guys believed in me. I have a lot of people to thank in Mexico. My family, they never gave up on me. A lot of people did, but they didn’t. I’m just happy we were able to make it work.”

Suárez’s team partied wildly when it was over, even pulling out a celebratory piñata shaped like a taco. The piñata was requested by Suárez for whenever he got his first win and clinched a spot in the playoffs – and he celebrated by punching a hole through it with his fist.

“They believed in me since Day One,” Suárez said of his team. “(We’ve got) all the people, all the resources to make it happen.”

Suárez then addressed his fans briefly in Spanish, saying: “This is the first one of many.”

Buescher’s second-place finish was also a season best in his RFK Racing Ford. He fell just short of his second career victory.

“Hurts to be that close, but congratulations to Suárez,” Buescher said. “We were trying, trying to get him. Ran out of steam there.”

Suárez, who won the Xfinity Series championship in 2016, is the fifth foreign-born driver to win a Cup Series race. He joins Colombia’s Juan Pablo Montoya, Australia’s Marcos Ambrose, Canada’s Earl Ross and Italian-born American Mario Andretti.

The success of Suárez and Trackhouse Racing could be a welcome boost to a sport eager to expand its cultural footprint. After moving to the U.S. 11 years ago with a desire to race on bigger stages, Suárez is a major success story for NASCAR’s Drive for Diversity program, which aims to bring new perspectives and backgrounds to a largely monocultural organization for much of its history.

Click here to read the full article on ABC 7.

How Simply Antojitos is selling authentic Puerto Rican treats ahead of the Summer season
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Adamary Sosa decides to make and sell limbers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and later founded Simply Antojitos. Photo Courtesy of Adamary Sosa.

By Tiffany Rivera, Al Dia

Adamary Sosa has vivid memories of her mother making batches of homemade limbers when she was just a kid when her family lived in Reading, Pennsylvania.

“When I was younger she had a limber business and she would be up all night making limbers and I would be the nosey kid taste testing the limbers,” Sosa said in an interview with AL DIA News.

Her mother would sell them to neighbors from her home.

These refreshing homemade individually-made ice cream treats that are frozen in plastic cups come from Puerto Rico, and are the quintessential remedy to beat the heat in the summertime.

However, when her family moved to Philadelphia, her mother grew hesitant with selling the limbers out of her home.

This is why Sosa decided to make limbers in the summer, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

She got the idea when she began craving the sweet treat, but couldn’t find any high quality ones like her mother used to make.

“I would get limbers, they were not of good quality, they were watery,” she said.

Sosa wanted to add a gourmet twist to it and combine the traditional cooking method with different and popular flavors in the states, like caramel, nutella, and oreo flavors.

She began experimenting with different flavors and offered some limbers to her co-workers at the Norris Square Community Alliance, where Sosa works.

Her co-workers loved them.

“I tried it, I launched a page and it went from there,” she said.

With the success of her creations from her co-workers and friends on social media, Sosa began selling her frozen treats through Instagram.

She named her new found business, Simply Antojitos.

“It started with three simple flavors and I started experimenting with other flavors and getting their opinions,” said Sosa.

Now the Latina entrepreneur has a large social media following and a huge selection of limbers.

“Most of my clientele will ask for them, I post my inventory daily with what I have,” she said.

She also delivers treats to her clients when they are not able to meet her at her meeting spot.

“I live in Juniata and so there is a spot close to my house, near Aldi grocery store, so anyone who wants to meet me to pick up the limbers can meet me there, I usually communicate with them through Instagram,” Sosa said.

Her two new summer flavors include dulce de leche and strawberry lemonade. However, she does have 30 other flavors of limbers to choose from.

“The dulce de leche came out of nowhere, I was having a conversation, customers like the caramel flavors from Starbucks and I wanted to make something with caramel and that’s how dulce de leche came out,” she said.

Click here to read the full article on Al Dia.

Young L.A. Latina wins prestigious environmental prize
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Nalleli Cobo holds the ouroboros environmental prize

By Edwin Flores, NBC News

At age 9, Nalleli Cobo was experiencing asthma, body spasms, heart palpitations and nosebleeds so severe she needed to sleep in a chair to prevent herself from choking on her own blood.

Across the street from her family’s apartment in University Park in South Central Los Angeles was an oil extraction site owned by Allenco Energy that was spewing fumes into the air and the community around her.

After speaking with neighbors facing similar symptoms, she and her family began to mobilize with their community, suspecting that was making them sick. They created the People Not Pozos (People Not Oil Wells) campaign. At 9 years old, Cobo was designated the campaign’s spokesperson, marking the start of her activism and organizing career.

In March 2020, Cobo, the co-founder of the South Central Youth Leadership Coalition, helped lead the group to permanently shut down the Allenco Energy oil drilling site that she and others in the community said caused serious health issues for them. She also helped convince the Los Angeles City Council and Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to unanimously vote to ban new oil exploration and phase out existing sites in Los Angeles.

After pressure from the community and scrutiny from elected officials, Allenco Energy agreed to suspend operations in 2013. The site was permanently shut down in 2020, and the company was charged in connection with state and local environmental health and safety regulations. There are ongoing issues around cleaning and plugging up the oil wells.

Cobo co-founded the South Central Youth Leadership Coalition in 2015 to bolster efforts against oil sites and work toward phasing them out across the city.

That year, the youth group sued the city of Los Angeles, alleging violations of the California Environmental Quality Act and environmental racism. The suit was settled after the city implemented new drilling application requirements.

Cobo, now 21, was recognized Wednesday for the environmental justice work that has spanned more than half her life. She received the prestigious Goldman Environmental Prize, which is awarded annually to individuals from six regions: Europe, Asia, Africa, Islands and Island Nations, North America, and South and Central America.

“I did not want to answer the phone because it was an unknown number,” Cobo, who was getting bubble tea when she received the call about the prize, told NBC News in a Zoom interview Wednesday. “I didn’t even know I was nominated. I started crying.”

During the 1920s, Los Angeles was one of the world’s largest urban oil-exporting regions. More than 20,000 active, idle, or abandoned oil wells still reside in the county, and about one-third of residents live less than a mile from an active oil site.

Studies have shown that living near oil and gas wells increases exposure to air pollution, with nearby communities facing environmental and health risks including preterm birth, asthma and heart disease.

Click here to read the full article on NBC News.

Who Is Johnny Depp’s Latina Lawyer, Camille Vasquez?
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Camille Vasquez wearing all white in a courtroom

By Yamily Habib, Be Latina

Forget Amber Heard or the trial circus that the legal battle between the actress and movie icon Johnny Depp has become. The real star is Camille Vasquez, Depp’s lawyer who has gone viral on social media, inspiring thousands of Latinas around the world.

As USA Today explained, Vasquez, 37, is one of Depp’s nine lawyers in his $100 million defamation lawsuit against his ex-wife Heard. Today, she is almost as big a social media phenomenon as the two protagonists in one of the most widely followed lawsuits in recent years.

Born in San Francisco to Cuban and Colombian parents, Camille Vasquez graduated in 2006 from the University of Southern California and in 2010 from Southwestern Law School in Los Angeles, the BBC explained.

For the past four years, she has been an associate at Brown Rudnick, the high-profile law firm hired by Johnny Depp to represent him in his $50 million defamation case against Heard. Vasquez is one of nine lawyers at the firm involved in the trial.

She specializes in litigation and arbitration, focusing on representing plaintiffs in defamation cases, and in 2021, she was named one of Best Lawyer magazine’s “One to Watch” lawyers.

She previously assisted Depp in claims against his former lawyer Jake Bloom and his former business manager Joel Mandel.

Today, the hashtag #camillevasquez has more than 980 million impressions on TikTok. A video of her quick objections to Heard’s lead attorney Elaine Bredehoft had nearly 30 million views.

The two-minute TikTok video of her courtroom interruptions with the caption “where did this woman get her degree?” coincided with a 1,820% increase in Google searches for Southwestern Law School, Vasquez’s alma mater, research from the higher education website Erudera shows.

Similarly, thousands of Latina law students have been inspired by Camille Vasquez to continue fighting for their dreams.

“Had to meet Camille Vasquez and tell her what an inspiration she is to so many Latinas!” gushed Carol Dagny (@caritodagny) on TikTok. To which Andrea (@b.andrea111) replied: “As a Latina entering my final year of law school, no one has gotten me as excited to join the field like she has!”

Click here to read the full article on Be Latina.

Abuela’s Counter: How Two Latinas Are Helping People Connect Through Cooking
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cooking co founders of Abuela's Counter

By Be Latina

For many families, the ultimate form of connection happens in the kitchen — the foods, flavors, smells, and traditions that take place around a kitchen counter, are what bring loved ones together across borders and across generations.

That is especially true for immigrants, who often leave everything behind in search of a better life, bringing only their memories, their rituals, and their recipes with them.

The co-founders of Abuela’s Counter feel this deep in their souls.

Abuela’s Counter is the brand-new, foodie-focused website and Instagram account you need in your life. The Cuban-American entrepreneurs behind the operation are building a community of food-lovers who, like them, learned important life lessons at their Abuelas’ counters.

Bringing Cuban Food and Cuban Connections to Life for a New Generation
Ani Mezerhane and Cristina Bustamante – two Miami-based Latinas who come from Cuban families – came up with the concept of Abuela’s Counter when bonding over their shared love of food and their deep obsession with all things delicious, especially the traditional Cuban dishes they grew up with. But, to them, food is about more than just what sustains you physically; it’s equally about what fills your soul. It’s what connects them to their roots, their ancestors, and to where they came from.

They realized that they can’t be the only Cuban Americans who spent the bulk of their childhood absorbing crucial nuggets of wisdom – the importance of family, never forget where you came from, and always include raisins in picadillo (we know this is an ongoing debate for many Cubans), how to craft a perfect croqueta, and more – from their Abuelas at the kitchen counter.

Abuela’s Counter is all about teaching followers how to make traditional Cuban dishes with a modern spin. The concept is that Cuban cooking can be intimidating – possibly because recipes can take a lot of time and patience and possibly because your grandmother never actually taught you how to make her specialties – and they want to help people connect to their Cuban roots through cooking.

Food as a Love Language for Latinas
“Cuban culture is a very mothering culture. It’s all about our mothers and Abuelas taking care of everything and taking care of us, not just with love, but also with food. Food is our love language,” explains Ani to BELatina News.

“So, in many cases, our generation never really learned to cook, because it was always something that our relatives did for us. That’s intimidating, trying to re-make those recipes.” And it’s not just about the actual methods and recipes, but also the emotions behind these dishes. “The myths and the legends that surround these dishes can be very intimidating to try to recreate,” Cristina added.

What if you try to make a traditional dish you grew up eating, but you mess it up? Or what if your Abuela never showed you how to make it and you have to start from scratch? It can certainly feel overwhelming, which is a common sentiment that Abuela’s Counter is hoping to tackle one flan at a time.

After all, food and all of the senses that go along with it can take us back to our childhoods and help us bond with family members of all generations. The traditions in the kitchen are what bring us all together, and that’s never been more true than for families of immigrants. “No matter what we do, it always comes back to food. It all goes back to sitting at Abuela’s counter and learning about life. Learning how food doesn’t just feed us but brings us together,” Ani and Cristina say on their website.

On their Instagram page, they offer easy-to-follow recipes, and how-to videos showcasing simple ways to whip up Cuban masterpieces. From Guava Coconut Cookies to Ropa Vieja to Arroz Con Pollo, Cuban Flan, and everything in between, they’re taking the mystery out of the equation so anyone can make these dishes.

Their recipes are broken down in detail on their website. There are no secret steps or mysterious quantities (did you ever notice how older generations always add “a pinch” of this or “a splash” of that?). Just easy to follow, simple, step-by-step recipes of classic favorites that have probably been haunting you since birth. We’re looking at you Cuban flan.

Flan is a favorite of both Ani and Cristina, which is why they were so proud when they got it just right.

For an easy weeknight (or any night) dinner, they swear by their Fricase de Pollo, a comforting chicken dish that fills you up in all the important ways.

Click here to read the full article on Be Latina.

PepsiCo Launches $50 Million Juntos Crecemos Platform to Support Hispanic-Owned Businesses Across the U.S.
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PepsiCo Launches $50 Million Juntos Crecemos Platform to Support Hispanic-Owned Businesses Across the U.S.

By PR Newswire

PepsiCo, Inc. (NASDAQ:PEP) today announced Juntos Crecemos, (Together We Grow), a $50 million platform aimed at strengthening Hispanic-owned businesses, specifically restaurants, bodegas and carnicerías (meat markets), addressing foundational business challenges, and supporting business growth over the next five years. Juntos Crecemos is part of PepsiCo’s Racial Equality Journey Hispanic Initiative, a $172 million set of commitments launched in October of last year.

According to a study by the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Hispanic-owned businesses alone contribute over $800 billion in economic activity and play a central role in their communities. According to a Stanford University survey, as a result of the pandemic, 86% of Hispanic small business owners reported significant negative impacts, including complete closure, and were only half as likely as their white counterparts to receive Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans. This, coupled with the historic systemic barriers affecting wealth and educational attainment, contributes to smaller business income among Hispanic business owners according to research conducted by the Small Business Association.

“Juntos Crecemos and The PepsiCo Foundation IMPACTO Hispanic Business Accelerator bring our Racial Equality Journey and PepsiCo’s values to life,” said Esperanza Teasdale, VP & GM, Hispanic Business Unit, PepsiCo Beverages North America. “We’re proud and committed to supporting and elevating the voice of the Hispanic small business community that is impacted by systemic inequality.”

Benefits for Hispanic Small Business Owners
Small business owners participating in Juntos Crecemos will have access to the Hispanic Digital & Delivery Program, a customized eight-week consultation curriculum tailored to meet their specific needs, including helping them improve their online presence, delivery logistics, online ordering, and marketing practices. Participants will also have access to consultation from experts via office hours, where they will receive coaching and guidance on devising solutions for business challenges.

“Providing these resources is critical to delivering on our ambition to drive long-term change and address systemic barriers in communities that too often have been overlooked,” said Antonio Escalona, SVP & GM, Hispanic Business Unit, PepsiCo Foods North America. “This is only the beginning, and we are committed to working alongside these restaurants, bodegas, and carnicerías to propel their businesses forward.”

As part of the program, participating bodegas and carnicerías owners will also receive store essentials, including safety kits, consumer promotions and targeted digital media support. To help raise awareness of Juntos Crecemos and assist with implementation, PepsiCo has partnered with the Latino Food Industry Association (LFIA).

“Hispanic small business owners have disproportionately been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic, which is why we are excited to work with PepsiCo in bringing this much needed support to our community,” said Lupillo Ramirez, LFIA president. “Juntos Crecemos will provide valuable guidance and mentoring while connecting and uniting business owners across the country in sharing best practices.”

PepsiCo Foundation Support
As part of the Juntos Crecemos platform, The PepsiCo Foundation is officially launching the IMPACTO Hispanic Business Accelerator which will provide $10 million in funding to help 500 Hispanic small food and beverage business owners in 13 cities across the U.S. grow their enterprises over the next five years. It will also help these owners overcome systemic economic disparities and create economic opportunity within the community by providing business coaching in English and Spanish and other resources.

Today, The PepsiCo Foundation is announcing the first 150 IMPACTO grant recipients, including:

La Peña Restaurante in Chicago, IL,
De Mi Fogón in Houston, TX
Cuernavaca’s Grill in Los Angeles, CA
8 Burger in Miami, FL, and
Claudy’s Kitchen in Bronx, NY

“The contributions of Hispanic communities are an integral part of the fabric of American culture. Unfortunately, the community has also long faced systemic barriers to success – a divide only deepened by the impact of COVID-19,” said C.D. Glin, Vice President, The PepsiCo Foundation and Global Head of Philanthropy, PepsiCo. “Supporting long-term solutions that drive economic equity in the Hispanic community isn’t just right – it’s imperative. The IMPACTO Hispanic Business Accelerator and Juntos Crecemos are about more than just saving businesses; it is about investing in the people that bring life, culture and vibrancy to our communities and ensuring that they continue to grow, thrive, and prosper today and for generations to come.”

The Foundation is currently working with Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) partners including, Allies for Community Business in Chicago; Ascendus in New York; LiftFund in San Antonio; Accion Opportunity Fund in San Jose and Los Angeles; and DreamSpring in Albuquerque and other local organizations to provide $10,000 grants to beneficiaries and help business owners at every level retain employees and construct long-term business plans to support their future economic success. While launching in 13 cities (New York City, Miami, Chicago, Orlando, Albuquerque, Houston, Dallas, San Antonio, Los Angeles, El Paso, Las Vegas, Denver, Phoenix) where Hispanic-owned small businesses were hit particularly hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, The PepsiCo Foundation plans to expand the IMPACTO program to additional cities over the next five years based on community need.

Click here to read the full article on PR Newswire.

adidas Brings You Another Pair Of “Bad Bunny Forums At Home”
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newly-surfaced adidas Forum ’84 Low in pink a question arises: which came first – Bad Bunny or the Three Stripes.

By Jovani Hernandez, Sneaker News

Adidas Brings You Another Pair Of “Bad Bunny Forums At Home”

It’s no secret that sneaker brands often rely on a high-profile collaboration in order to introduce or energize a given silhouette. Yet, in the case of the newly-surfaced adidas Forum ’84 Low in pink a question arises: which came first – Bad Bunny or the Three Stripes. Back on April 4th, 2021, the Puerto Rican megastar (who’s fresh off dropping the “Un Verano Sin Ti” album) launched an Easter-friendly take on the adidas Originals classic.

For adidas‘ own offering, the low-top silhouette is covered in bolder shades of pink, with fuzzy suede at the profile 3-Stripes and lower heel complimenting high-quality leather panels throughout the majority of the upper. Lockdown straps at the top of the tongue boast their standard 1984 build, abandoning the trail-inspired buckles used by Bad Bunny. Underfoot, sole units opt for a solid rich rose makeover, delivering a non-experimental look that’s worthy of any comparison to the aforementioned collaboration from Spring 2021. Enjoy product shots of the pair ahead, courtesy of Up There Store, and anticipate an adidas.com launch as summer gets going.

Click here to read the full article on Sneaker News.

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