News From Our Partners

AMAC Announces Eboni Wimbush as Its Next President & CEO

Eboni Wimbush headshot
Eboni Wimbush

Washington, DC (October 6, 2021)— After a prolonged national search and vetting process, the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is proud to announce Eboni Wimbush as its President & CEO. She will begin her new role at the end of this month.

“I am honored to be selected as AMAC’s next President & CEO at such a pivotal moment in history. The organization connects my early passion, interest and education in aviation along with my dedication to creating a positive, lasting impact for women and disadvantaged communities. I am ready to serve and prepared to lead and position AMAC for the future, working with the AMAC Board of Directors and National Office to be the voice at the table and to create opportunities and economic mobility for our members.”—Eboni Wimbush, President & CEO, AMAC

Eboni Wimbush most recently served as the Deputy Director of the Baltimore City Mayor’s Office of Children & Family Success. She was responsible for advancing all of the work across the agency including building and implementing the strategies and systems to operationalize the City’s $100 million eviction prevention program in response to the global pandemic as well as leading the agency’s contracting, human resources, grant compliance and equity strategy. Previously, Eboni served as Chief of Staff at Baltimore City Department of Transportation, where she was responsible for the Office of Communications, the Office of Legislative Affairs and External Affairs. Additionally, she served as a key advisor to the Director in overseeing the day-to-day management, operations and performance activities of the agency’s 1,250 employees and $250 million budget. Prior to joining Baltimore City and over a span of two decades, Eboni had a distinguished private sector career with Fortune 500 companies including FedEx Corporation, Johnson Controls and Siemens where she held leadership roles gaining a depth and breadth of knowledge and experience in developing and building energy infrastructure projects and delivering outcomes. Eboni holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with a concentration in Management from Embry Riddle Aeronautical University. She resides in Alexandria, Virginia and is an active member of Alfred Street Baptist Church where she serves as the President of the College Ministry. Eboni is a proud parent of one son.

“Eboni is no stranger to AMAC and brings a wealth of transportation and related leadership and management experience and education. I have been able to witness Eboni’s work over the last few years and am very excited to have her take the helm of AMAC. I am confident that she will bring exceptional leadership to the AMAC National Office and lead our efforts to execute AMAC’s mission. Furthermore, she will serve as a highly respectable and credible representative of AMAC throughout the membership and the industry.”—Ricky Smith, Chair, AMAC Board of Directors, and CEO, Baltimore/Washington Thurgood Marshall International Airport.

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC)
The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit www.amac-org.com.


Top Performers Join Forces with American Indian College Fund for Free Online Indigenous Peoples Day Concert

First-Ever Entertainment Event Celebrating Indigenous Peoples, History, and Cultures to Air October 10 at 6:30 p.m. M.D.T.

Mark your calendars! The American Indian College Fund is hosting a free streaming concert to celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day on Sunday, October 10, 2021, at 6:30 p.m. MDT. The event will feature performances by Native entertainers and artists allied with Native causes from across the nation.

virtual concert poster with entertainers featured

Performances and stories from students and performing artists will include Pink Martini, Portugal. The Man, Martha Redbone, Brooke Simpson, Indigo Girls, Sarah McLachlan, Frank Waln, The Ghost of Paul Revere, Jewel, and Nathaniel Rateliff. Special guests will include Robbie Robertson, Tea Leoni, Mandy Patinkin/Kathryn Grody, and Ziggy Marley. We will also hear from non-Indigenous friends and allies who create shared spaces and opportunities where Native perspectives are welcomed, heard, and valued, to create greater visibility and inclusion for Native people.

Native students over the years have continually shared that one of the biggest challenges in their education and in their lives is that they do not feel that Native people are seen or heard. The American Indian College Fund believes education is the answer to creating better opportunities for Native people through access to a higher education. But it also knows that the world is not just or kind to Native American graduates. The College Fund is working to create a nation where Native people are visible, their voices are heard, and their contributions are valued.

To see a full list of performers and to register for the free event, please visit https://collegefund.org/events/indigebration/.

About the American Indian College Fund About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 32 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $15.5 million in scholarships and other direct student support to American Indian students in 2020-21. Since its founding in 1989 the College Fund has provided more than $259 million in scholarships, program, and community support. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LULAC Presents Presidential Medal To Parents Of Navy Seaman Brandon Caserta

Nation’s Largest and Oldest Latino Civil Rights Organization Vows to Step-Up Push for Passage of the Brandon Act

Parents of Brandon Caserta accept award onstage with LULAC representative

Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) has presented the organization’s highest recognition to Patrick and Teri Caserta, parents of the 21-year-old Navy aircrew mate who took his life at Naval Station Norfolk. Caserta left the Navy seal training program after suffering an injury and expressed unhappiness that his career opportunities afterward were limited. His parents say their son was being repeatedly bullied, and his superiors failed to act when he displayed symptoms of depression. Caserta died on June 25, 2018, when he walked out on the flight line and jumped into a spinning helicopter tail rotor.

The Caserta couple is now devoting their lives to the passage of the Brandon Act,, and say the legislation named after their son will help other servicemembers experiencing a medical crisis requiring psychological care without the fear of retaliation. The LULAC Presidential Medal presentation ceremony was held at the Texas LULAC State Convention in Austin, Texas as part of a special event to honor military veterans and active service members.

“Patrick and Teri Caserta are courageous for sharing the tragic story surrounding their son’s loss,” said Domingo Garcia, LULAC National President. “Also, they are powerful in their determination to fight because they do not want other families to experience the nightmare they have, and so that our country’s men and women in military uniform do not have to endure the pain and humiliation Brandon did, up until the very day he could not any longer,” added Garcia.

In accepting the LULAC Presidential Medal, Patrick Caserta said, “Our son loved the military and loved his country. What happened to him should have never happened and we are working to convince our elected officials in Congress that passing the Brandon Act will benefit our service members and the nation. If this is our son’s legacy, while the pain never goes away, we are forever grateful,” said Caserta.

Teri Caserta, Brandon’s mother added, “Our son loved life and loved people because his gift was his sensitivity for others. Since he was a little boy, he loved helping those he saw going through difficulty or in need. At school, he would give away his lunch money so someone else could eat. Later, when he was older, he would help strangers on the streets. That was just his nature, and I am so glad that the trait most people remember about Brandon was his constant smile, the way he saw life,” she said.

The Brandon Act is part of the Save Our Servicemembers Campaign which also highlights several important initiatives currently underway:

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About LULAC
The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit LULAC.org.


LULAC has launched a toll-free hotline for the Vacunate Hoy Initiative

August 1, 2021, LULAC will be launching 1-877-MI-LULAC (1-877-615-8522) to cover all of your COVID-19 related questions and needs.

This landmark initiative will help guide callers to learn more about COVID-19, answer any questions about vaccinations, and provide general assistance regarding health, support services, and general referrals to local community resources.
We hope to keep supplying the Hispanic community with critical information and resources to encourage the decision to get vaccinated.

The hotline will be available 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Callers can speak to someone in English or Spanish to receive assistance. Additionally, our team will be on hand to help you schedule a vaccine at your nearest location as well as help provides transportation codes for Lyft through the generosity of our partners.

For additional resources on COVID-19 and vaccines visit www.vacunatehoy.org


United Health Foundation Grants $430K to American Indian College Fund for Tribal Scholars Program

Program to Provide Native Students Health Scholarships to Help Grow the Native Health Workforce

Denver, Colo., July 27, 2021— The United Health Foundation (UHF) is continuing its support to ensure Native American communities have access to urgently needed health care with a $430,000 grant to provide scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Natives studying in the health and dental care fields. The pandemic and its disproportionate impact on Native communities highlighted the importance of access to culturally responsive health care for underserved populations. The goal of the United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program is to increase the number of employable American Indian and Alaska Native healthcare graduates to work as primary care physicians, nurses, physician assistants, mental and behavioral health specialists, dentists, and pharmacists.

Studies have long shown that American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people experience poorer health status and suffer from greater rates of chronic disease such as diabetes mellitus and heart and respiratory diseases, while also having shorter lifespans than other groups, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. The America’s Health Rankings Health Disparities Report (visit www.americashealthrankings.org) reveals many additional significant pre-pandemic disparities for Native Americans including food insecurity, severe housing and the rate of depression. And with the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, Native communities suffered devastating results.

Lack of dental care also leads to health problems in Native communities. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with increased risks for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies also show that people with poor oral health and bad teeth are often stigmatized socially and when seeking employment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
By providing American Indian and Alaska Native students with scholarships to earn degrees in health care, Indigenous graduates can provide people in their communities with personalized, culturally competent care.

Scholarships will be offered to Native students beginning in 2021-22 and are renewable throughout scholars’ academic careers. Scholars will be undergraduate or graduate students, with a preference for undergraduates who are rising sophomores or higher and pursuing degrees in the above-referenced fields at tribal colleges and universities or mainstream colleges and universities. Interested students can learn more and apply at https://collegefund.org/scholarships.

“We are honored to continue our partnership with the American Indian College Fund and support its work to create a more diverse health workforce by increasing the number of providers ready to deliver personalized, culturally competent care,” said Tracy Malone, President of the United Health Foundation. “We are proud to help aspiring health care professionals reach their dreams and support their communities.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “On behalf of the College Fund and our students, I want to acknowledge that not only do the United Health Foundation Scholarships support students, but this partnership improves the health and well-being of our families. We have rich cultural traditions that inform how to live healthy lives and it is through the education of our own people that we will be able to bring culturally competent health care to our communities. The United Health Foundation is a leader in addressing health disparities in ways that honor the knowledge of Indigenous people. We are honored to support their leadership.”

About the United Health Foundation — Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce, and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed more than $500 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at UnitedHealthFoundation.org.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


36th Annual AMAC Airport Business Diversity Conference: Honoring the Legacy, Perfecting the Present & Building for the Future Highlights

 

AMAC Airport Directors’ 20/20 Vision Forum: Addressing the Economic and Health Impact of COVID-19 on the Aviation Industry

The Airport Directors’ 20/20 Vision provided a relaxed environment for the diverse group of Airport Directors to explore and discuss the positive and negative impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on aviation operations, health, air service, economic development, job creation, tourism and trade. The forum was moderated by Marshall J. Taggart, Jr., Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / At-Large Director, AMAC Board of Directors / Former Executive Airport Director, Montgomery Regional Airport. Panelists included: Balram Bheodari, General Manager, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport; Mario Diaz, Airport Director, Houston Airport System; Cynthia Guidry, Vice Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / Director, Long Beach Airport; Ron Mathieu, President & CEO, Birmingham Airport Authority; Perry Miller, Vice Chair, AMAC Airport Leadership Collective / President & Chief Executive Officer, Richmond International Airport; and Jamie L. Rhee, Commissioner, Chicago Department of Aviation

AMAC Catalyst Awards

The AMAC Catalyst Awards honors AMAC members who have made outstanding contributions to further AMAC’s goals and mission. AMAC members were invited in advance to nominate individuals or organizations—award recipients were honored at the live virtual event.

AMAC Advocate of the Year Award: Courtney Thornton, Executive Vice President, Corporate Strategy & Business Development, Hudson Group

AMAC Airport of the Year Award: Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

AMAC Airport Concessions Innovation and Inclusion Award: Jackmont Hospitality

AMAC Airport Design Innovation and Inclusion Award – Los Angeles World Airports

AMAC Chairman’s Award: Angela Gittens, (Retired) Former Director General, Airports Council International

AMAC Hall of Fame Award: Derryl Benton, Executive Vice President, Business Development, HMSHost

AMAC Inclusive Leadership Award: SP Plus Airport Services

AMAC Local Small Business Champion Award: William “Bill” Swift, Treasurer, AMAC Board of Directors / Owner, Business Traveler Services, Inc. and Swift Services, Inc.

AMAC Small Business Partner Award: CI2 Aviation

AMAC Foundation Celebrating Women in Aviation

Bishop Vashti McKenzie keynoted this annual program that is designed to foster, promote and applaud the success of women in aviation and aerospace-related businesses and career achievements. This year’s honorees featured:

AMAC Foundation Pinnacle Award: Myrna White, Assistant General Manager, Office of Public Affairs, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

AMAC Foundation Emerging Leader Award: Mori Russell, Business Development Manager, Concessions International

AMAC Foundation Local Industry Leader Award: Tina Houston, Vice President, Metro Market Leader GA/AL for AECOM

AMAC Legislative & Policy Updates

Pete Buttigieg, Secretary, U.S. Department of Transportation provided remarks on the importance of minority businesses and commitment to the Biden Administration Infrastructure Plan. Maxine Waters, U.S. Representative, California 43rd Congressional District, also highlighted the importance of small and minority businesses.

AMAC Emerging Leaders: Going Up! Crafting Your Elevator Pitch

Pinky Cole, Founder and Owner of Slutty Vegan ATL provided valuable techniques on crafting your elevator pitch and positioning yourself/business for success.

Save the Date! AMAC and the Chicago Department of Aviation will present the 37th Annual AMAC Airport Business Diversity Conference: Redefining Aviation Opportunities Together from June 20–22, 2022 in Chicago, IL. Please stay tuned for additional details at www.amac-org.com/annualconference.


American Indian College Fund Awards Four Tribal Colleges with Four-Year Computer Science Initiative Grants

Computer science education provides today’s college students the necessary skills and opportunities to thrive in today’s world. Yet American Indian and Alaska Native peoples are still and have been historically underrepresented in the computer science fields. To remedy that, the American Indian College Fund launched its Tribal College and University Computer Science Initiative to create new and expand existing computer science programs at higher education institutions serving American Indian and Alaska Native students to meet the community and workforce needs of Indigenous communities and to provide career opportunities for Native students in computer science fields.

The four-year initiative will focus on faculty hiring and professional development; developing or enhancing computer science academic programs and curriculum at the TCUs; developing and participating in a community of practice activities; and participating in community engagement, sustained pathways, and/or student support through industry partner relationships.

The College Fund selected the following four applicants to participate in the initiative. The TCUs and their programs include:
• Bay Mills Community College (BMCC), located in Brimley, Michigan. BMCC’s program, Nanda-gikendan Waasimowini (seek to learn computers in Ojibwe), will develop an online Bachelor of Science degree in computer information systems with a computer science track that will be accessible across the country. BMCC will hire one additional full-time instructor to develop courses and two adjunct faculty to meet specific course needs. It will also support its current Computer Information Systems department chair/faculty member to obtain a graduate degree and relevant computer science education and training. BMCC students will receive hands-on experience in programming, project design, technical support, and will work to help BMCC create computer science awareness in the community.

• The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA), located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, will launch its The IAIA Art of Computer Science program. IAIA will create an interdisciplinary computer science environment across degree programs using computer science courses/modules while supporting development of a gaming degree. It will also hire full-time, pro-rata, and adjunct faculty to teach, and contractors to develop computer science curriculum and assist other departments with integration of computer science education across disciplines. To ensure all faculty have proficient computer skills, IAIA will also support professional development for 35 permanent faculty to take basic computer science coursework to integrate computer science concepts and skills into their courses and programs of study. The Institute will implement community engagement projects for students to incorporate computer science education and awareness into their community internships work to help provide their communities with an understanding of the value computers and computer science skills in a culturally relevant way.

• Navajo Technical University (NTU), located in Crownpoint, New Mexico, will launch its CSE@NTU-Computer Science Enhancement at NTU program to enhance current associate degrees in computer science programming by expanding the programs to the Bachelor of Science degree level. NTU will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to assist in teaching and developing the program. NTU will also support current computer science faculty and the new hire with professional development opportunities relevant to computer science education and will incorporate speaking opportunities for computer science industry experts and professionals to work with faculty, staff, and students.

• Salish Kootenai College (SKC) in Pablo, Montana will launch its Increasing Computer Science Capacity at Salish Kootenai College program to offer computer science programs through the creation of a one-year certificate of completion in computer programming and to offer enhanced computer science coursework for SKC’s STEM disciplines. SKC will develop a path for the computer programming program’s sustainability through dual-enrollment opportunities for reservation high school students. The college will hire one additional full-time computer science faculty member to support dual-enrollment courses and courses within the proposed one-year certificate program and will support current and new faculty with professional development opportunities in culturally sustaining pedagogy, technical pedagogy, and specialized industry training relevant to computer science education and training. SKC will also host summer coding workshops and develop dual-enrollment computer science courses with at least two reservation high schools to enhance student exposure to computer science education and careers.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The self-determination of the Tribal people is closely aligned with our ability to adapt and make use of all the tools of modern society. I am reminded that as Native people that we have always valued using the tools created by others to make our lives better. My colleagues at the College Fund and I agree that computer science is one of those tools. Computer science is foundational to so many aspects of life today. Everything from information technology to entertainment to building a picture of the well-being of our communities is tied to our ability to use computer science to our advantage. We are excited that our TCUs will be able to increase their capacity and open doors to more career opportunities.”

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.


American Indian College Fund Receives Unrestricted Gift from MacKenzie Scott Foundation

The American Indian College Fund, the national non-profit organization serving American Indian and Alaska Native college students and tribal colleges and universities, learned the MacKenzie Scott Foundation, headed by the billionaire novelist and philanthropist of the same name and her husband Dan Jewett selected it to receive an unrestricted gift. The College Fund provides Native American and Alaska Native students with greater access to a higher education and the support to succeed in college and in their careers.

 

The gift could not have come at a better time. The national college attainment gap of Native Americans is already less than half of that of other groups at 15% (compared to 32.1% of all other groups), according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

When the pandemic hit, it heightened existing barriers for Indigenous people to access education. Native communities were hit hardest by the virus due to limited access to health care or inadequate health care services; community members with more existing chronic health conditions; and much higher rates of poverty that result in greater rates of food and housing insecurity among Native students, according to the Tribal Colleges and Universities #RealCollege Survey and subsequent College Fund student surveys. When lockdowns shuttered Tribal nations, many colleges and universities transitioned to online classes, leaving many students in remote, rural reservation communities cut off due to lack of affordable technology resources and connectivity. And after Tribal economies based largely in the service industry closed leading to high rates of unemployment, it left many of the more than 50% of College Fund scholars who work full- or part-time and who are the sole family breadwinners without jobs.

 

Any one situation taken alone would be stark, but taken together, they resulted in the steepest national pandemic-related declines in college enrollment among first-time entering Native students in the fall of 2020, according to American Indian Higher Education Consortium data. Freshman enrollment was down 11% overall at TCUs and down 23% nationally at all colleges and universities.

 

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “This gift is timely and pivotal because, in combination with the generosity of our network of current and future supporters, we now have the capacity to grow greater opportunities for American Indian and Alaska Native communities and to create lasting change. MacKenzie Scott and Dan Jewett’s acknowledgement of our work is a testament to the important role of education to transform the lives of our students, their families, and communities.”

 

The College Fund is committed to eliminating the college attainment gap among Indigenous people and ensuring that every American Indian and Alaska Native student that dreams of a higher education can achieve that dream. The College Fund continues to appreciate and rely upon the support of every one of its current and future supporters to meet its goals to transform the lives of Indigenous students, their families, and their communities through a higher education.

 

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. Among Native students that graduate from tribal college graduates, a 2019 Gallup survey shows 74% work in careers in their communities in fields such as health care, education, business, and more. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Remembering Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty

Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty
Jimmy Curtis Shorty. Photo Courtesy of the Navajo Times

The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES)i is mourning the loss of Jimmy “Jim” Curtis Shorty, one of the original co-founders of AISES and a former member of the Board of Directors. Jim dedicated his life, and his legal and engineering career, to his people, the Navajo Nation.

For six years, Jim directed the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico, Albuquerque.

NAPCOE is likely the first university-level program in the United States for Native students (some 30 at the time). Carol Metcalf-Gardipe, another instrumental AISES co-founder, was the first NAPCOE director, with Jim following in the mid-1970s. NAPCOE had a role in the early genesis of AISES, before there was any discussion about the formation of an organization for Native people in STEM.

The story of AISES began when Al Qöyawayma read a short article in the Arizona Republic about NAPCOE, which brought him into contact with Carol and Jim, and ultimately A.T. Anderson and George Thomas.

What soon followed was the formation of the American Indian Engineering Council, where Jim helped write the bylaws and formalize legal aspects of creating what would eventually become AISES as we know it today.

My remembrance of Jimmy C. Shorty by Dr. Bob Whitman

I first met Jimmy C. Shorty (Jim Shorty) when I returned to school for the fall semester in 1976. He was the new director of the Native American Program in the College of Engineering (NAPCOE) at the University of New Mexico (UNM). NAPCOE was the first program of its kind in an engineering school which was established solely to recruit and retain American Indian students in engineering. I worked for NAPCOE as a tutor and recruiter. He was my new boss but also became a good friend. He shared his experiences working in the Navajo Tribal government and in establishing AISES.

When I graduated with my undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from UNM, Jim slipped me a brochure of an organization called the American Indian Science and Engineering Society. He had informed me that it was a new organization and that I could join it with a one-time membership fee, and I would be a member for life. I was very skeptical of this organization, so I did not act on it for over a year.

In the summer of 1978, Jim submitted a request to my employer, IBM for my release time to teach basic mathematics to students in the NAPCOE summer institute. IBM granted the request and I returned to the University of New Mexico to teach a group of 28 American Indian students. This four-week summer institute set the basis for students to become familiar with the demands of being in engineering school.

When I was elected to the AISES board of directors in 1983, Jim provided counsel and advice. When I was elected Chair of the Board of Directors of AISES, I relied on him to interpret the bylaws of the organization. These bylaws were largely drafted by him.

Over the years, I would occasionally meet with Jim, usually at AISES conferences. He had many stories about his professional experiences. I feel that these stories set the basis for my mentoring. It was professional development that went well beyond the technical education I received as an engineering student.

When I joined the electrical and computer engineering faculty at UNM in 1996, my first course I taught there was video recorded. Jim, who worked for Sandia National Labs, would coordinate the receiving of my video-recorded lectures for distribution to Sandia employees taking my course.

Jim was one of only two American Indian bosses I had in my career and one of the few Navajo mentors in my professional development. He was a good friend who shared many Navajo jokes.

An Amazing Life Story

The third eldest of six siblings, Jim grew up in a humble environment and worked herding sheep in the gulches of Coyote Canyon, New Mexico. After graduating from St. Michael’s High School in 1957, he earned his BS in geology from St. Joseph’s College in 1961.

After being honorably discharged by the U.S. Army, Jim attended the University of New Mexico where he received his PhD in law and worked as a geologist for the Navajo Nation Department of Water Resources. He was well-known within the Navajo Tribe, where he was a fluent speaker and served as an assistant to the president.

While employed at Sandia National Laboratories, he worked as an educator and supervised various minority outreach efforts from 1983 to 2007 before retiring.

Jimmy is survived by his wife of 54 years, Patricia Shorty, sons Richard and Patrick Shorty, two granddaughters, and four great-grandchildren.

Jimmy was born April 15, 1937, in Rehoboth, N.M.; he peacefully passed away April 17, 2021, surrounded by his family.

He believed strongly in the AISES mission who was generous with his knowledge, teachings, and who inspired thousands of students through his work. Jimmy will be honored during the memorial portion of the 2021 AISES National Conference in Phoenix in September.


AISES Named “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits

AISES has been named a “2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit” by GreatNonprofits, the leading website for community recommendations of charities and nonprofits.

“We are honored to be named a 2021 Top-Rated Nonprofit,” said Sarah EchoHawk, AISES CEO. “We are proud of our accomplishments this year, including hosting the first virtual Leadership Summit, welcoming the University of Wyoming Native American Program as an AISES college chapter, and launching the Native Financial Cents website.”

The Top-Rated Nonprofit Award is based on the rating and number of reviews that AISES received from volunteers, donors, and supporters. “AISES is my family. These are my people. There are very few places where an American Indian Nerd feels welcome,” wrote one reviewer.

“AISES is a great example of a nonprofit making a real difference in their community,” said Perla Ni, CEO of GreatNonprofits, “Their award is well-deserved recognition not only of their work, but the tremendous support they receive, as shown by the many outstanding reviews they have received from people who have direct experience working with AISES.”

GreatNonprofits is the largest donation website for nonprofits and where people share stories about their personal experiences on more than 1.6 million charities and nonprofits. The GreatNonprofits Top-Rated Awards are the only awards for nonprofits determined by those who have direct experience with the charities – as donors, volunteers, and recipients of aid.

The complete list of 2021 Top Rated Nonprofits can be found at: https://greatnonprofits.org/awards/browse/Campaign:Year2021/Issue:All/Page:1

 


Hispanic-Serving Institutions Across the Nation Total 569

Data from 2019-20 academic year shows 30 new institutions became HSIs

SAN ANTONIO – The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities has released an analysis of the 2019-20 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) enrollment data, which shows an increase in the number of Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) and continued growth in Hispanic student enrollment at colleges and universities.

HSIs are institutions with 25 percent or more of Hispanic student enrollment. In 2019-20, HSIs made up 17% of all institutions of higher education and enrolled 67% of all Hispanic undergraduates. As a cohort, HSIs are very diverse and also enroll 41.3% of Asian American, 35.6% of Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, 24.4% of Black, and 15.8% of non-Hispanic white students.

HACU’s analysis of the 2019-20 IPEDS data used the Higher Education Act (HEA) federal definition of HSIs: nonprofit degree-granting institutions with full-time equivalent (FTE) undergraduate Hispanic student enrollment of at least 25%.

Findings include:

  • 235 HSIs are two-year public institutions. 150 HSIs are four-year public institutions.
  • 169 HSIs are four-year private institutions. 15 HSIs are two-year private institutions.
  • HSIs represent a total of 569 HSIs in 28 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico, up from the 539 institutions in 2018-19.
  • The number of Emerging HSIs, or colleges approaching the 25% Hispanic student enrollment threshold, showed an increase of ten more institutions from the previous year, which was 352 compared to 362 in the latest data.

Some important facts about HSIs to note:

  • HSIs enroll two-thirds of all Hispanic undergraduates.
  • The ten states with the most HSIs collectively enroll 308,755 Hispanic students and over 1.5 million students overall.
  • When you put together the student population at all HSIs, 46% of students are Hispanic.
  • Since 2013, HSIs have increased on average by 29 institutions per year.
  • California and Texas account for nearly 50 percent of all HSIs.
  • 23 out of the 24 states that have a Hispanic undergraduate enrollment of 10 percent or more, have either an HSI or Emerging HSI.
  • A majority of HSIs are in urban areas and are concentrated geographically, with 80% of these institutions located in six states and one territory: California, Florida, Illinois, New Mexico, New York, Texas and Puerto Rico.
  • HSIs and Emerging HSIs are present in all but 12 states, including some less known for their Hispanic population, such as Idaho, Kansas, and Georgia.

View the list* of HSIs and Emerging HSIs here

Download an HSI Fact Sheet and HSI Map here.

Celebrate Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, September 13-19, 2021

*This list released in coordination with Excelencia in Education.

About HACU
The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities was established in 1986 with a founding membership of eighteen institutions. In 1992, HACU led the effort to convince Congress to formally recognize campuses with high Hispanic enrollment as federally designated HSIs and to begin targeting federal appropriations to those campuses. Today, HACU represents more than 500 colleges and universities committed to Hispanic higher education success in the U.S., Puerto Rico, Latin America, Spain, and also school districts throughout the U.S. HACU is the only national educational association that represents Hispanic-Serving Institutions. HACU’s headquarters are located in San Antonio, Texas, with regional offices in Washington, D.C., and Sacramento, California.

ECMC Foundation Grants $1.125 Million to American Indian College Fund to Boost Workforce in North Dakota and Montana

Denver, Colo., March 31, 2021 — The American Indian College Fund is announcing ECMC Foundation’s grant of $1.125 million to fund two programs at tribal colleges and universities in North Dakota and Montana. This grant will help fuel Native American student success in careers in healthcare and education.

The North Dakota program “Strengthening Postsecondary Career Pathways Across North Dakota’s Tribal Colleges: Braiding Workforce Development and Native Student Success” provides $500,000 for a two-year program to develop a cohesive system to deliver health care education, stackable credentials, and coordinated career support. The program will align academic programming to support Native student credentialing and prepare students. Program graduates will help North Dakota meet its needs for state and tribal healthcare workers and improve healthcare career and citizen health outcomes. The program will also help increase the capacity of North Dakota TCUs.

All five North Dakota TCUs will participate in the program, which include Cankdeska Cikana Community College, Fort Totten; Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, New Town; Sitting Bull College, Fort Yates; Turtle Mountain Community College, Belcourt; and United Tribes Technical College, Bismarck.

The Montana TCU program “Building Montana Tribal College Transfer Pathways for Student Success” provides $625,000 to strengthen transfer pathways between participating Montana TCUs over two-and-a-half-years. The program will support Native student completion and employment in the healthcare and education fields. It will also increase student transfer rates between Montana TCUs by building progressive education pathways from certificate to associate to baccalaureate degrees using transfer policies, procedures, and student support programs. The goal is to increase the TCUs’ capacity to support Native student success, on-time student transfer, and degree completion.

Participating Montana TCUs include Aaniiih Nakoda College, Harlem; Blackfeet Community College, Browning; Chief Dull Knife College, Lame Deer; Fort Peck Community College, Poplar; Little Big Horn College, Crow Agency; Salish Kootenai College, Pablo; and Stone Child College, Box Elder.

“Since our founding, ECMC Foundation has focused on improving the educational and workforce outcomes for underserved students,” said ECMC Foundation President Peter J. Taylor. “We’re thrilled to support The College Fund’s critical work at the intersection of these issues, ensuring that more Native students are well-placed for the in-demand careers that will be central to our economic recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “This is an exciting and challenging time as TCUs develop more employment opportunities for Native and rural students through innovative and collaborative approaches to high-demand careers. We are pleased that ECMC Foundation recognized that TCUs serve as solid, community-based assets, building tribal and regional economies through meaningful employment.”

About ECMC Foundation—Based in Los Angeles, ECMC Foundation is a national foundation working to facilitate improvements that affect post-secondary educational outcomes — especially among underserved populations — through evidence-based innovation. It is one of several affiliates under the ECMC Group enterprise based in Minneapolis, which together work to help students succeed. The Foundation invests in College Success and Career Readiness (CTE); and uses a spectrum of funding structures, including strategic grantmaking and program-related investments, to fund both nonprofit and for-profit ventures. Visit ecmcfoundation.org to learn more.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LGBTQ+-OWNED AEQUALITAS MEDIA LAUNCHES NEW BRAND OUTvoices

● Aequalitas Media rebrands legacy LGBTQ+ publications as OUTvoices ● The multiplatform entity includes print, digital, TV, radio, and more ● All assets owned by Aequalitas Media, which is NGLCC Certified

Chicago, Illinois​ — ​​Following the 2020 acquisitions of legacy LGBTQ+ titles ​Echo Magazine Phoenix​ (​ 31 years); ​Out & About Nashville Magazine​ (16 years); and ​CAMP Kansas City Magazine​ (17 years), ​Aequalitas Media​ has launched ​OUTvoices​, a new national LGBTQ+ brand. The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content.

The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network.

Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City. “I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media. LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021.

The ​OUTvoices ​brand will deliver diverse, fresh, and original LGBTQ+ print, digital, audio and video content. The publications will be rebranded under the OUTvoices umbrella.​ ​Effective April 2nd 2021, all titles currently owned and published by Aequalitas Media with the exception of Gaycation Magazine​, will be renamed to reflect their inclusion in the OUTvoices network. ​Echo magazine will become OUTvoices Phoenix, ​OUT & ABOUT Nashville​ will become OUTvoices Nashville, and ​CAMP​ will become OUTvoices Kansas City.

“I couldn’t be more thrilled with the introduction of OUTvoices and the conversion of the titles we own underneath this new, truly inclusive brand — a one-stop opportunity for brands to easily and effectively advertise to this lucrative market,” ​said DJ Doran, CEO of Aequalitas Media.

LGBTQ+ veteran journalist and former Editor in Chief of ​Curve​ Magazine, Merryn Johns will join our editorial team to steer content under the new OUTvoices brand beginning April 2nd 2021.

“​I am thrilled to bring my passion for serving LGBTQ+ readers to OUTvoices and to bring them the best quality content possible, nationwide​,” ​said Johns​.

Additionally,​ OUTvoices Chicago​ will go live in Q2 of 2021. The new LGBTQ+ news and lifestyle website will feature originally produced articles and stories from the LGBTQ+ community in Chicago as well as curated content from other members of the OUTvoices network. Visitors to the new ​OUTvoices.us​ ​website and many other LGBTQ+ websites will be able to listen to ​OUTvoices Radio​, 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio.

OUTvoices Radio​, scheduled to launch later in March 2021, will be the first internet-based streaming LGBTQ+ talk radio station offering listeners pre-recorded and live programming 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The lineup includes shows from LGBTQ+ thought leaders, entertainers, entrepreneurs, musicians, and more. The OUTvoices Radio widget will be offered to ALL LGBTQ+ websites at no cost. “​It is part of our company philosophy of supporting other LGBTQ+ medias by sharing content for FREE,” said Doran.

It will be followed by ​OUTvoices TV ​in late Q2 of 2021 and will feature originally produced series such as The Gaycation Travel Show with host Ravi Roth. Season 1 will begin airing new episodes airing every Friday beginning May 14th. OUTvoicesTV is currently filming The Gay Gourmet, a cooking show with Oprah Winfrey’s former personal Chef Art Smith and Joe Eats World Chef Joe Morales as hosts.

OUTvoices TV​ will offer viewers access via our YouTube channel to high quality shows that reflect the depth and breadth of talent within the LGBTQ+ community in News, Opinion, Fashion, Travel, Food, and more.

The nationally focused website ​OUTvoices.us​ domain has been chosen as a reflection of ​us​, the LGBTQ+ community. As a website, it will encourage small-to-medium LGBTQ+ sites to unite under the OUTvoices domain. This will allow smaller sites that may have been overlooked by major brands and agencies to combine their audiences and analytics to be more attractive to advertisers. The OUTvoices network will also allow other members to share and benefit from resources, content, and exposure in beneficial ways.

Other Aequalitas acquisitions and initiatives for 2021 include:

  • ● LGBTQ+ Media Acquisitions, Aequalitas Media​ currently has three LGBTQ+ media assets in the pipeline which are scheduled to close sometime in 2021.
  • The Gay Travel Business Network, a new business-to-business travel organization led by LGBTQ+ travel expert and Executive Director Ed Salvato and a board of travel luminaries helping tourism, hospitality and travel-related businesses and brands better connect with other like-minded businesses desiring to do business with each other.
  • Aequalitas Content Creators Association​,​ a​ 501c6 organization for LGBTQ+ content creators to gather at an annual conference in late August in Cedar Rapids IA to network with each other and listen to industry experts and exchange ideas and best practices toward increasing reach and revenue as the industry continues to evolve.
  • NGLCC(National LGBT Chamber of Commerce) Certification, ​Aequalitas Media ​and all of the assets under its umbrella have been certified as LGBT business enterprises by the NGLCC.

“The expanding portfolio of LGBTQ+ media assets and these new ventures strengthen Aequalitas Mediaand create additional value for our advertisers, clients and partners as well as contribute to the revitalization of LGBTQ+ media in 2021 and beyond​,” ​said Doran​.

ABOUT AEQUALITAS MEDIA

Aequalitas Media​​ [​pronounced e-QUAL-i-tas​] is one of the fastest growing LGBTQ+ media companies in the U.S., from spanning print, digital publishing and media buying to managing a 24/7 LGBTQ+ talk radio station and a national network of LGBTQ+ websites. ​Aequalitas Media​ is well positioned for growth in 2021 and beyond. Our company’s Advisory Board is made up of some of the best and brightest in LGBTQ+ media and business giving us a distinctive edge over our competitors when it comes to delivering results and evolving opportunities to expand our reach.


Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute

Apply today for our Energy and Child Welfare Graduate Fellowships!

Application Deadline:
Friday, February 19, 2021 at 11:59 pm ET

CHCI is looking for emerging leaders from across the country interested in working alongside policy makers and industry experts dedicated to creating positive change. We have extended our deadline for Graduate Fellows interested in working in Energy and Child Welfare.

CHCI’s Graduate Fellowship Program offers a unique, paid, nine-month opportunity to receive hands-on leadership training, access to a diverse industry network and invaluable work experience on Capitol Hill and beyond that helps its Fellows to stand out in today’s job market.
Know someone who might be a good fit for the program? Please share this information!

APPLY TODAY!

API Graduate Fellowship
CHCI is seeking Graduate Fellows interested in energy. After a first-half placement in a Congressional office, API Graduate Fellows work in the D.C. office of the American Petroleum Institute (API) for the second half of the program. At API, the Fellow will gain exposure to API’s work across research, advocacy and safety promotion. The Fellowship would be tailored to the Fellow’s background and interests, with work potentially in safety standards, digital and traditional media communications strategy, community engagement, policy research, and/or government relations.

“The work I do as an API Fellow has helped me better understand the role legislation plays in the energy and environmental insecurities our communities face and the work needed to be done for a just and equitable clean energy transition. This fellowship has brought me one step closer to connecting my undergraduate work as a chemical engineer with the energy and environmental legislation that will best help our communities as we reach and attain our global climate goals.”
– David Valdes, 2020-2021 API Fellow

Child Welfare Graduate Fellowship
CHCI is seeking Graduate Fellows interested in child welfare (including foster care, adoption, kinship care) and serving families at-risk of entering foster care. Applicants should have a degree, work and/or volunteer experience related to serving vulnerable children and families and demonstrated leadership in addressing such issues faced by the Latino community. No specific degrees are required, but dedication and passion for helping families within their communities is greatly encouraged.

“As a child welfare graduate fellow, I have the unique opportunity to work on federal policy that directly impacts children. Whether it be writing letters, introducing new bills, re-introducing bills, meeting with constituents/stakeholders, and offering my perspective on legislative actions–there is a wealth of opportunity to create a landscape that prioritizes racial, economic, and immigrant justice for children in the welfare space.”
– Marina Sangit, 2020-2021 Child Welfare Graduate Fellow

Want to learn more about the CHCI Graduate Fellowships? Click here for to  view a video overview of the program, or to learn more about the benefits of the Fellowship for STEM majors.

Interested in our Internship or High School Program?
Learn more about CHCI’s Congressional Internship Program and R2L NextGen programs!


The ODP Corporation Launches Nonprofit Initiative to Help Accelerate the Creation, Growth and Prosperity of Minority-Owned Small Businesses

Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America® will connect Black and Hispanic small business owners with education, access and aid in collaboration with the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

The ODP Corporation (NASDAQ:ODP), a leading provider of business services, products and digital workplace technology solutions through an integrated B2B distribution platform, today announced the launch of Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America®, a new nonprofit initiative designed to help accelerate the creation, growth and prosperity of Black and Hispanic-owned small businesses.

In collaboration with the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers and the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC), Elevate Together™ will help to deliver impactful, measurable and scalable support services that foster business creation and growth opportunities for Black and Hispanic small businesses with five or less employees. As part of this initiative, eligible small business owners will gain access to educational workshops, training and mentorship services, professional networks and more. Businesses may also be eligible to receive aid in the form of cash grants, products and services.

“We strongly believe that in a society where the playing field is level, Black and Hispanic small businesses will play a vital role in restoring the health of our economy and in driving long-term wealth creation across North America,” said Gerry Smith, chief executive officer for The ODP Corporation. “With support from our associates, customers, community partners and other like-minded corporations, we hope to continue to foster new opportunities for minority-owned small businesses, to help them prosper and get the resources they need to better compete in today’s marketplace.”

In keeping with its longstanding history of serving local community businesses and as the founding partner of Elevate Together™, The ODP Corporation is proud to pledge an initial investment of $250,000, which will help to launch the initiative in Atlanta, Chicago, Los Angeles, Philadelphia and South Florida.“Small businesses are key to job creation, and through the work of the National Urban League’s Entrepreneurship Centers Program, current and prospective entrepreneurs in underserved communities across the country are being empowered to establish new ventures every day,” said Marc H. Morial, president and chief executive officer for the National Urban League. “This partnership with Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America® will help us provide additional services that will impact and improve the lives of many Black business owners for years to come.”

According to a recent survey from the National Association for Business Economics, 73% of surveyed forecasters believe that the economy will not return to its pre-pandemic level until the second half of 2021. To help strengthen local communities and foster job creation during this challenging time, it is now more important than ever to provide minority-owned small businesses with access to essential business resources and direct financial investments.

“At the USHCC, we are proud to advocate for Hispanic-owned businesses to foster economic development and build sustainable prosperity for our American economy,” said Ramiro A. Cavazos, president and chief executive officer for the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce. “We’re excited to help launch this new initiative, championed by The ODP Corporation, and look forward to expanding our services and reach to support America’s diverse small business owners through our network of chambers during this time of economic recovery.”

Individuals interested in helping to elevate minority-owned businesses through this initiative can make a donation to Elevate Together™ at their nearest Office Depot or OfficeMax store and at checkout on officedepot.com.

For more information about Elevate Together™ powered by Round It Up America®, including how to participate as a minority-owned small business or get involved as a corporate donor, visit ElevateTogether.org

About The ODP Corporation
The ODP Corporation (NASDAQ:ODP) is a leading provider of business services and supplies, products and digital workplace technology solutions to small, medium and enterprise businesses, through an integrated business-to-business (B2B) distribution platform, which includes world-class supply chain and distribution operations, dedicated sales professionals and technicians, online presence, and approximately 1,200 stores. Through its banner brands Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, CompuCom® and Grand&Toy®, as well as others, the company offers its customers the tools and resources they need to focus on their passion of starting, growing and running their business. For more information, visit news.theodpcorp.com and investor.theodpcorp.com.

The ODP Corporation and Office Depot are trademarks of The Office Club, Inc. OfficeMax is a trademark of OMX, Inc. CompuCom is a trademark of CompuCom Systems, Inc. Grand&Toy is a trademark of Grand & Toy, LLC in Canada. ©2021 Office Depot, LLC. All rights reserved. Any other product or company names mentioned herein are the trademarks of their respective owners.


Millions of American Indian College Fund Scholarship Dollars Available for California’s Native American Students

Applications Open February 1, 2021 for The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, Sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians

Native American college students from qualified California tribes have millions of dollars of scholarship funds available to them through the American Indian College Fund’s Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, sponsored by the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians.

Funds are available to most California tribal members seeking higher education, including technical and vocational certifications and associate, bachelor’s, and graduate degrees. Students earning a technical or vocational certification can get up to $5,000 per year. Students attending a state or private community college or university can get up to $20,000 per year.

Enrolled members of California tribes which receive little or no gaming or agricultural revenue from the state are eligible. Interested students can learn more and apply online beginning February 1, 2021 at collegefund.org/california.

The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship program was created as part of The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians’ longstanding traditions and values in support of the education and development of youth – and funded by the 2016 Tribal State Gaming Compact with the State of California.

Christopher Villaruel, Chandra Norton, and Kenwa Kravitz are three recipients who are realizing their education and career goals thanks to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship.

Christopher Villaruel, a member of the Pit River Tribe and a senior forest hydrology major at Humboldt State University, plans to combine his education and training with traditional knowledge to create better managed forests that are less susceptible to devastating fires and to maintain watershed health, providing cleaner water for all Californians.

Chandra Norton, a member of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is working on her bachelor’s degree in community advocates and responsive education in human services. She plans to seek a master’s degree in public health administration to assist her in her career with her community’s local health clinic.

Kenwa Kravitz, a member of the Pit River Tribe, is studying Native studies leadership. She advocates in her community as a member of the Redding Cultural District Board. Her efforts have led to the land acknowledgement of the Wintu people, a formal apology, and creation of culturally informed education curricula.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Expanding support of American Indian and Alaska Native students is a shared goal of the American Indian College Fund and The Pechanga Band of Luiseño Indians. The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship will provide eligible students with amazing support for their journey of college success.”

In addition to The Wi’aasal (Great Oak) Future Leaders Scholarship, the College Fund offers many additional scholarship opportunities to American Indian and Alaskan Native students from across the nation seeking a higher education. To learn more visit https://www.collegefund.org.

About the American Indian College Fund: The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) announced the new members of its Alumni Association National Board, and regional chapter officers.

The CHCI Alumni Association (CHCI-AA) is a network of more than 4,400 Latino professionals across the country. The national board includes Jose Plaza, President; Jazmin Garcia, Vice President; Stephanie Medina, Civic Engagement Chair; Daniel Lind, Communications Chair; and Eric Hernandez, Professionalda Development Chair.

The CHCI-AA mission is to promote active and visible leadership in the community, while providing members with increased opportunities for professional development, networking and, most importantly, opportunities to mentor young Latino/a/x professionals who participated in CHCI’s leadership programs.

“The CHCI Alumni Association is central to advancing our mission, and I am excited to welcome the new national board and regional officers,” said Marco Davis, CHCI President and CEO. “CHCI alums are our strongest asset, and a testament to how important our work is to empower Latino/a/x professionals early on with meaningful leadership opportunities and experiences that help them excel in all sectors and industries. Moreover, CHCI alums continue to pay it forward by giving their time, talent, and expertise to uplift the next generation of Latino leaders.”

“I am honored and humbled to be elected as the next president of the CHCI Alumni Association and the opportunity to represent the more than 4,400 alumni across the country as a member of the CHCI Board of Directors. CHCI for decades has been charting the course for thousands of Latinxs as they navigate careers in a myriad of fields and exposing them to life-changing opportunities. I am thrilled to be joined by an amazing cohort of leaders on the board and together we are committed to building on the legacy of past CHCI-AA leadership and developing long-lasting partnerships and change for all alumni,” said Jose Plaza, CHCI Alumni Association National President (CHCI Graduate Fellow 2012-2013).

The leadership of the CHCI-AA Regional Chapters include:

Chicago

Maria Velazquez, President

Edgar Gonzalez, Jr., Vice President

Claudia Valencia, Secretary

Ana Artiaga, Treasurer

Dallas

Jesus Ginez, President

Ramon Hernandez, Vice President

DC Metro

Antonio Hernandez, President

Aliza Auces, Vice President

New York City

Pamela Cardoso, President

Phoenix

Flavio Bravo, President

South Florida

Robert Locke, President

Ana Moas, Vice President

Oscar Serra, Secretary

Abel Ramos Taype, Treasurer

Carla Santamaria, Programs Coordinator

Southern California

Brian Lucero Contreras, President

Wendy Ramirez, Vice President

Jacqueline Perez-Valencia, Secretary

Gisela Ariza, Treasurer

Jorge Gonzalez Canizal, Programs Coordinator

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) is the premier Hispanic nonprofit and nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization in the country dedicated to developing the next generation of Latino leaders®. CHCI provides leadership, public service, and policy experiences to outstanding Latino/a/x students and young professionals, and convenes Members of Congress, other public officials, corporate executives, nonprofit advocates, and thought leaders to discuss issues facing the nation and the Hispanic community. Visit CHCI.org and follow us @CHCI on social media.

 

Contact:
Maria Ibañez / mibanez@chci.org


AT&T Gives $1.5 Million in Pandemic-Related Supplies to More Than 20 Tribal Colleges and Universities

Tribal Colleges and Universities on Indian Reservations Receive Supplies

The American Indian College Fund and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium are receiving $1.5M in pandemic-related supplies including hand sanitizer, disinfectant and gloves. Both organizations are working with AT&T to distribute the supplies to more than 20 tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) across the country. This comes as

Native communities face soaring COVID-19 infection rates, rolling lockdowns are enacted on Indian reservations, and tribal community members are having difficulties accessing supplies. Native American communities suffer COVID-19 infection rates greater than 3.5 times that of the white population, according to the Centers for Disease Control.

The American Indian College Fund is the largest provider of scholarships to Native American students in the nation, and the American Indian Higher Education Consortium is the national advocacy organization supporting tribal college and universities. The two organizations worked with AT&T to ship the supplies to the following TCUs, including:

  • The American Indian Higher Education Consortium, Washington, D.C.
  • Blackfeet Community College, Montana
  • College of Menominee Nation, Wisconsin
  • College of the Muscogee Nation, Oklahoma
  • Diné College, Arizona
  • Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Minnesota
  • Fort Peck Community College, Montana
  • Iḷisaġvik College, Alaska
  • Institute of American Indian Arts, New Mexico
  • Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Wisconsin
  • Little Big Horn College, Montana
  • Little Priest Tribal College, Nebraska
  • Navajo Technical University, New Mexico
  • Northwest Indian College, Washington
  • Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College, North Dakota
  • Oglala Lakota College, South Dakota
  • Red Lake Nation College, Minnesota
  • Salish Kootenai College, Montana
  • Sinte Gleska University, South Dakota
  • Stone Child College, Montana
  • Tohono O’odham Community College, Arizona
  • Turtle Mountain Tribal College, North Dakota
  • White Earth Tribal and Community College, Montana
Albert Gourneau (left) and Anthony Desjarlais (right) from Turtle Mountain Community College’s facilities department prepare to distribute sanitizing supplies and safety equipment at the tribal college campus in Belcourt, North Dakota

“We are glad to play our part to help provide the critical resources Native communities need to survive the COVID-19 pandemic, which has disproportionately affected Native Americans this year,” said Tom Brooks, Vice President of External and Legislative Affairs at AT&T. “There is much more work to be done to ensure Native American communities have access to the resources needed to get through the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond. We look forward to continuing this vital work with the American Indian College Fund and American Indian Higher Education Consortium to address this.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said,

“On behalf of our tribal colleges and universities and our sister organization, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium, I want to share our deep appreciation of AT&T’s gift of pandemic-related supplies for our communities. Our rural, economically distressed communities need support to protect the health and well-being of students and their families. The commitment of AT&T to helping address health and other disparities in the U.S. is demonstrated through their generous support.”

AT&T has been a long supporter of the American Indian College Fund to turn reservations into places of opportunity. The long relationship with the American Indian College Fund has helped Native American students with income and geographical barriers earn a college degree through funded support at the 35 Tribal Colleges and Universities around the country.

Peter Romero, Director of Facilities and Security at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, readies the college’s newly delivered supply.

About AT&T— AT&T Inc. (NYSE:T) is a diversified, global leader in telecommunications, media and entertainment, and technology. AT&T Communications provides more than 100 million U.S. consumers with entertainment and communications experiences across TV, mobile and broadband. Plus, it serves high-speed, highly secure connectivity and smart solutions to nearly 3 million business customers. WarnerMedia is a leading media and entertainment company that creates and distributes premium and popular content to global audiences through its consumer brands, including: HBO, HBO Max, Warner Bros., TNT, TBS, truTV, CNN, DC Entertainment, New Line, Cartoon Network, Adult Swim and Turner Classic Movies. Xandr, now part of WarnerMedia, provides marketers with innovative and relevant advertising solutions for consumers around premium video content and digital advertising through its platform. AT&T Latin America provides pay-TV services across 10 countries and territories in Latin America and the Caribbean and wireless services to consumers and businesses in Mexico.

AT&T products and services are provided or offered by subsidiaries and affiliates of AT&T Inc. under the AT&T brand and not by AT&T Inc. Additional information is available at about.att.com. © 2021 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T, the Globe logo and other marks are trademarks and service marks of AT&T Intellectual Property and/or AT&T affiliated companies. All other marks contained herein are the property of their respective owners.

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


CHCI NAMES NEW MEMBERS TO BOARD OF DIRECTORS FOR 2021-2022

CHCI Chair-Rep. Barragan

Representative Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA-44) is CHCI’s New Chair.

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) announced the addition of new members of its Board of Directors, as well as the full slate of officers for 2021-2022.

Representative Nanette Diaz Barragán (CA-44) will serve as CHCI’s new Chair. Rep. Barragán also serves as the First Vice Chair for the Congressional Hispanic Caucus (CHC) in the 117th Congress.
The CHCI Board officers include: Vice Chair Ronald Estrada, Senior Vice President of Corporate Social Responsibility & Community Empowerment, Univision Communications, Inc.; Treasurer Maria Luisa Boyce, Vice President for International Policy, UPS; and Secretary Peter R. Villegas, Co-Chairman, Mercury. In addition, CHCI named Ignacio A. Sandoval, a Partner at Morgan Lewis as General Counsel.

“I am honored to serve as CHCI’s Chair and work alongside the organization’s dedicated staff, alumni, and program participants, as well as our Board and Advisory Council members,” said Rep. Barragán. “I look forward to advancing and supporting CHCI’s mission to develop the next generation of Latino leaders, and to ensure that our voices are represented in all sectors of the workforce.”

The new members joining the Board of Directors include:
Sen. Ben Ray Lujan (NM)
Rep. Tony Cardenas (CA-29)
Rep. Darren Soto (FL- 09)
Rep. Norma Torres (CA-35)

Silvia Aldana, Manager of Federal Affairs – PG&E Corporation
Raul Anaya, President of Business Banking – Bank of America
Angela Arboleda, Senior Director, Federal Government Affairs – Altria
David Gonzales, Global Chief Diversity Officer – Bristol Myers Squibb
Bruce Harris, Vice President of Federal Government Affairs – Walmart
Antonio Moya, Manager of the Latino Relations Department – Salt River Project (SRP)
Leo Muñoz, Executive Director of Federal Governmental Affairs – Comcast Corporation
Ademola Oyefeso, International Vice President and Director of the Legislative and Political Action
Department – United Food and Commercial Workers International Union (UFCW)
Jose L. Plaza, CHCI Alumni Association National President
Ignacio A. Sandoval, Partner – Morgan Lewis
Zuraya Tapia Hadley, Manager of Public Policy – Facebook
Other CHCI Board members who will continue to serve in 2021-22 include:
Rep. Jimmy Gomez (CA-34)
Evelyn DeJesus, Vice President for Education – American Federation of Teachers (AFT)
Rich Garcia, Vice President, Operations – State Farm
Jesse Price, Public Policy – TikTok

“We are excited to welcome the new 2021-2022 CHCI Board Members and Officers. With backgrounds that range from corporate executives, to entrepreneurs, to civic leaders, CHCI counts on the expertise of a remarkable slate of leaders at the top of their professions. Our board will continue to strengthen our programs and continue to position CHCI as a center for thought leadership,” said Marco Davis, CHCI President and CEO.

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) is the premier Hispanic nonprofit and nonpartisan 501(c)(3) organization in the country dedicated to developing the next generation of Latino leaders®. CHCI provides leadership, public service, and policy experiences to outstanding Latino/a/x students and young professionals, and convenes Members of Congress, other public officials, corporate executives, nonprofit advocates, and thought leaders to discuss issues facing the nation and the Hispanic community. Visit CHCI.org and follow us @CHCI on social media.
Contact: Maria Ibañez / mibanez@chci.org


Early Childhood Education Linked to Long-Term Education Attainment

American Indian College Fund to Strengthen Early Childhood Teacher Pipeline with Support from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation

Denver, Colo.—January 14, 2021— Early childhood education can help close the college education attainment gap among American Indians and Alaska Natives—which is currently less than half of other groups at 14.8%—by improving students’ academic achievement, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Thanks to a two-year, $600,000 grant from The W.K. Kellogg Foundation, the American Indian College Fund will help tribal college communities strengthen and expand the pipeline for Native teachers through its Indigenous Early Childhood Education Systemic Engagement and ECE Learning in Native American Communities program.

Native teachers serve as critical role models engendering the success of young Native American students, while understanding the unique needs of their students. In addition to improving young children’s long-term educational attainment, early childhood education can also reduce the need for special education and increase employment and earnings, according to the U.S. Department of Education.

The American Indian College Fund’s two-year systemic engagement program will provide program mentorship between tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) and their students and will help increase TCUs’ capacity to address and eliminate barriers for Native American college students seeking a degree in early childhood education. The systemic engagement program will support dissemination of new knowledge and methods of culturally centered early childhood education in tribal college communities. The program began November 1, 2020.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “Native people know that our children come to us from a sacred place and that their socialization is critical to their own well-being and to the well-being of tribal nations. We appreciate our partnership with the W.K. Kellogg Foundation because it results in our TCUs adapting our teachings and practices into modern infrastructure, demonstrating resiliency and commitment to kinship and identity.”

About The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF)—The W.K. Kellogg Foundation (WKKF), founded in 1930 as an independent, private foundation by breakfast cereal innovator and entrepreneur Will Keith Kellogg, is among the largest philanthropic foundations in the United States. Guided by the belief that all children should have an equal opportunity to thrive, WKKF works with communities to create conditions for vulnerable children so they can realize their full potential in school, work and life.

The Kellogg Foundation is based in Battle Creek, Michigan, and works throughout the United States and internationally, as well as with sovereign tribes. Special attention is paid to priority places where there are high concentrations of poverty and where children face significant barriers to success. WKKF priority places in the U.S. are in Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico and New Orleans; and internationally, are in Mexico and Haiti. For more information, visit www.wkkf.org

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute R2LNextGen Program – Apply by February 15, 2021

CHCI’s R2L NextGen Program will be hosting a weeklong summer leadership program for current high school sophomores and juniors. During the program, students will meet with Members of Congress, visit historic sites in Washington, D.C., and participate in leadership development training that will give them the tools they need as a part of the next generation of Latino leaders. This program is completely free to all participants, including travel*, housing*, etc. R2L NextGen will be held in three different sessions in 2021.


APPLICATION DEADLINE IS FEBRUARY 15, 2021. For more information visit https://chci.org/programs/r2l-nextgen/


ERG Resource Group

Global ERG Network

Visit info@globalergnet.com for more information.


American Indian College Fund to Award 10 Tribal Colleges and Universities with Grants for Native Arts Enrichment and Expansion of Existing Programs and Curriculum Development

Native communities have historically used traditional arts to transfer knowledge about culture, language, mathematics, science, and the land to their communities and upcoming generations. The American Indian College Fund is awarding $900,000 in grants to nine tribal colleges and universities for the two-and-a-half-year program to establish new Native arts programs and to expand existing Native arts programs at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs). In addition to transferring traditional arts knowledge to the next generation in Native communities, the grants will also ensure that Native arts are more deeply understood, more widely practiced, and more broadly recognized.

A total of 29 TCUs in the following 10 states are eligible to apply: Alaska, Arizona, Southern California, Montana, Minnesota, New Mexico North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, and Wisconsin.

According to Bridget Skenadore, Program Officer of Native Arts and Culture at the College Fund, the goals of the program are to establish Native arts programs at the tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) to pass on cultural knowledge and artistic skills, ensuring Native communities are fluent in Native arts practice; to create leaders in tribal communities that champion the arts and foster equitable, accessible, safe practice within their communities; to connect Native communities to each other to create cultural corridors; to establish community-based anchor organizations or infrastructure to foster a thriving artistic environment conducive to creative practice; and to ensure community-based artistic and cultural continuity.

This program will continue the work the College Fund began in the Native arts space in 2013 with its three-year Restoration and Preservation of Traditional Native Arts and Knowledge, which was available to 13 TCUs located in the upper-Midwest states and was so successful that it was renewed for an additional three years. The grant laid the groundwork for building out successful Native arts programs by enhancing the capacity of TCUs through the development of new core academic classes and more structured community-based traditional Native arts programs, such as bow-making, quill work, and moccasin-making. The program also built capacity at TCUs for intergenerational transfer of Native artistic and cultural practices to tribal community members and students through funding for master artist, apprentice, and artist-in-residency programs.

Finally, the College Fund awarded seven TCUs with $3,000 Distance Learning grants to support transition from in-person classes and community events to an online format during the pandemic. Funding trainings, consulting services, publications, social media, printers, website subscription upgrades and/or other related items that support this area. Funding cannot be used for the purchase of technology such as laptops, tablets, or chrome books. Grants were awarded to Blackfeet Community College, College of Menominee Nation, Diné College, Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe College, Northwest Indian College, and Salish Kootenai College.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The missions of the TCUs are rooted in indigenous ways of knowing and our support of arts programming helps TCUs fulfill that mission. We believe access to indigenous art is one of our inherent rights, as that access helps build community wellbeing and strengthens tribal identities. We are excited to partner with our TCUs and foster their innovative approaches to the intergenerational transfer of art knowledge and skills.”

About the American Indian College Fund—The American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 31 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $9.25 million in scholarships to American Indian students in 2019-20, with scholarships, program, and community support totaling over $237 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement Launches Multicultural Leadership Program

(Chicago, IL) – In collaboration with corporate partners Edelman and Barilla, the Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement (HACE) launched a Multicultural Leadership Program (MCLP) pilot. The 5-month program is designed for professionals of color to build self-awareness on the cultural values and unique challenges faced in the workplace, to master leading diverse teams, and to build a strong support network across communities, all the while transforming high-potential professionals to high-performing leaders.

Jean-Pierre Comte, President of Barilla Americas states, “At Barilla, our diversity and inclusion journey starts with the recognition that supporting diversity and inclusion is not only the right thing to do, but is also good for our business. Especially during a global pandemic, a diverse workforce allows for a deeper understanding of society and leads to stronger decision making. By taking a strategic approach to invest in our diverse leaders, we are living out our commitment to become a more inclusive and equitable workplace.”

Dani Jackson, Chicago Diversity & Inclusion Lead at Edelman added, “At Edelman, we believe diversity, equity and inclusion is imperative to transform our company and our society, empowering our workforce to bring who they are to the table to do the best work for our clients. In addition to recruiting racially and ethnically diverse talent, we continue to intentionally create space for talent to thrive at the highest levels of leadership. We are proud to partner with HACE to provide leadership development opportunities at Edelman.”

Multiculturalism is not a new concept to HACE. The diversity represented in the Latinx community aides in promoting allyship and unity across all communities. Latinos are part of the Black, Asian, and many other communities that experience many similar and unique challenges in the workplace. In 2019, HACE’s annual theme centered around Intersectionality and in 2020, HACE’s theme of “Our Collective Power” focuses on building a more equitable and inclusive workforce and society, together. The MCLP was the perfect next step towards achieving this.

“In a time where there is such a longing for unity, equity, and inclusivity more than ever, I could not be prouder to have launched this pilot in partnership with Barilla and Edelman”, states Patricia Mota, President & CEO of HACE. “These two corporations are leading the way in ensuring their employees of color are feeling supported and heard.”

The MCLP cohort is a demographically diverse group of professionals made up of 39% African American, 33% Latinx, and 28% Asian with education and experience levels ranging across the gamut. The majority of participants reside in Chicago with approximately one third residing on the East and West coasts including New Jersey, Washington DC, Florida, and Los Angeles, CA. Collectively, Edelman and Barilla, sponsored 18 employees. Edelman is a global communications firm, founded in 1952, a family-run company with 6,000+ employees globally. Barilla is a global Consumer Packaged Goods (CPG) company headquartered in Italy, with 8,400+ employees worldwide and an estimated $4 billion in annual revenues.

To learn more about the HACE Multicultural Leadership Program, please visit: www.haceonline.org. For more information on the program, contact Sonia Del Real at sonia@haceonline.org. For media inquiries, contact Julian Gonzalez, Marketing and Communications Manager at julian@haceonline.org.

About HACE
The Hispanic Alliance for Career Enhancement (HACE) is a national non-profit dedicated to the employment, development, and advancement of current and aspiring Latino professionals. Since 1982, HACE has served as a resource for Latinos in the workplace and is a subject matter expert for corporations seeking to access diverse talent. Through professional development, resources and networks, and by facilitating access to meaningful career opportunities, HACE helps Latinos succeed in every phase of their careers. With a network of over 77,000 across the country, HACE works with employers to remain competitive in an increasingly dynamic economy by helping them attract, develop and retain Latino and diverse professionals. For more information, visit HACEonline.org


US Organizations Receive Diversity Impact Awards at ERG Leadership Summit

Greensboro, NC (October, 2020)The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) recognized the outstanding achievements of Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and other DE&I initiatives at the Diversity Impact Awards™ ceremonies during the USC Marshall Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24.

Each evening of the conference included award ceremonies honoring the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor of the Year Recognition Awards. “The virtual event didn’t dampen the spirit and excitement of the award winners as they celebrated the incredible accomplishments of their teams,” said Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Officer at Talent Dimensions.

The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data-driven and scientifically-validated model developed by Dr. Theresa M. Welbourne, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning. The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives. For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors.

“While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least. We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing. We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions.

Congratulations to all our Diversity Impact Award winners!

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients:

  1. Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  2. Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  3. Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  4. Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  5. Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  6. ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  7. Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  8. Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  9. Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  10. NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  11. Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Business Resource Group
  12. Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  13. Southern California Edison – Latinos for Engagement, Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  14. Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  15. Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  16. Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  17. NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  18. Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  19. State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)
  20. Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  21. JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  22. Dominion Energy – We3
  23. American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  24. Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  25. American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients:

  1. Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  2. Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  3. Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  4. Cigna – Power of Connections Wellness Circles
  5. Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  6. Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  7. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks
  8. Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  9. Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  10. American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish and Muslim EBRGs

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients:

  1. Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  2. Portsmouth Naval Shipyard
  3. Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  4. Ricoh – International Women’s Day
  5. Halliburton – Focus on Family
  6. NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  7. Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  8. Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  9. American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  10. Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™
The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™. The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. The new award process leverages a data-driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations. The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm, PRISM International, Inc.

About the ERG & Council Conference™
ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com.

About the Association of ERGs & Councils
The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com.

About PRISM International, Inc.
PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com.


Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) and the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) Sign Memorandum of Understanding to Collaborate in Advancing Diversity and Business Opportunities in Aviation

The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) and the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) signed a historic Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that commits the organizations to formally collaborate in advancing diversity and promoting opportunities for companies within the aviation industry by leveraging their collective membership and training resources.

Both organizations seek to promote best practices and opportunities for their member companies to succeed in airport development pursuits. The MOU states that the organizations “recognize that increased diversity within the airport development industry will foster benefits and help fill the pipeline of future development experts.”

Under the terms of the MOU, AMAC and ACC will endeavor to: • Identify and implement specific actions to identify and promote best practices in airport development projects;

  • Educate their respective members and airports on teaming, procurement, contracting and business best practices in general;
  • Identify opportunities to attract more students into airport development careers;
  • Promote diversity in the industry; and
  • Educate their respective members and airports on best practices in diversity, equity, and inclusion as it relates to increasing aviation industry business and career opportunities for diverse/underrepresented individuals and companies.

AMAC Chief Operating Officer Anthony Barnes noted, “For 36 years, AMAC has been the driving force of eliminating barriers minority and women-owned companies face when seeking to engage in airport business and employment opportunities. Partnering with like-minded organizations, like ACC, will strengthen our impact in promoting a diverse and inclusive airport environment that fuels innovation and creativity when building our airports for the future.”

“ACC has always appreciated the close partnership and shared goals we have with AMAC over the years,” said ACC President T.J. Schulz. “The signing of this MOU codifies this partnership and ACC’s commitment to advance airport development companies of all sizes in this challenging time for aviation. We also look forward to taking steps to work with AMAC on increasing opportunities for minorities to engage and succeed in this industry at this important time in our society.”

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com

About the Airport Consultants Council (ACC) The Airport Consultants Council (ACC) is the global trade association that represents private businesses involved in the development and operations of airports and related facilities, focusing on the business interests of firms with airport-related technical expertise.


LULAC Scholarship Opportunity

The PowerUp Fund is offering $5,000 grants and intensive mentoring to Latino small businesses in your state! Applications are open until October 14.

Google.org announced a $3M grant to Hispanics in Philanthropy’s PowerUp Fund to make this possible! Together with Ureeka—a community built to support and grow underrepresented small businesses—the PowerUp Fund will not only help grow Latino small businesses, but also help entrepreneurs build the skills to continue that growth in the future.

Apply now at powerupfund.org/powerupfund

About LULAC
The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is the nation’s largest and oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization that empowers Hispanic Americans and builds strong Latino communities. Headquartered in Washington, DC, with 1,000 councils around the United States and Puerto Rico, LULAC’s programs, services and advocacy address the most important issues for Latinos, meeting critical needs of today and the future. For more information, visit www.LULAC.org


Register now for the 2020 AISES National Conference. This year is an all-virtual event.

All you have to do is register and voila! You’ll have great content at your fingertips fo

r three fun-filled days. Be sure to visit the booths in our Exhibit Hall and chat with booth reps. Registration closes October 5.

Wes Studi is the 2020 AISES National Conference Keynote Speaker.

Cherokee actor, artist and musician Wes Studi, the first Native American actor to receive an Oscar, will be the keynote speaker at the all virtual 2020 AISES National Conference on October 15-17, 2020.

Wes will share his experiences on the role of purpose, resiliency and increasing the visibility of Native representation and peoples in the communities that surround us, locally and internationally.

Registration for the 2020 AISES National Conference is open until October 5. Learn more at conference.aises.org


CHCI Hispanic Heritage Month Events Recap First Ever All Virtual Leadership Conference and 43rd Annual Awards Gala 

CHCI kicked off Hispanic Heritage Month with its signature events – an all virtual Leadership Conference on September 14-18, and the 43rd Annual Awards Gala on September 21.

Combined, both events attracted more than 6,000 global and national industry leaders, public officials, community advocates, influencers, award-winning journalists, and other professionals from the public, private, and non-profit sector representing 46 states as well as Washington, DC and Puerto Rico, and 23 countries on six continents.

The conference and gala program book is available here. The events were seen on the conference platform and through CHCI’s social media and other national digital news channels. We value your participation and comments about our event.

Please take a few minutes to share your feedback on our event survey here.

Access all conference and gala recordings below.
Leadership Conference: Day 1, Day 2, Day 3, Day 4, Day 5
43rd Annual Awards Gala


US Organizations to Receive Diversity Impact Awards at October Conference

The Association of ERGs & Councils (a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and Talent Dimensions) released their annual list of the Top 25 US Employee Resource Groups (ERGs), Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERGs, Top 10 Diversity Action and Executive Sponsor Recognition Awards.  These groups will be recognized at an award ceremony during the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations 2020 ERG Leadership Summit Week: A Virtual Event October 19 – October 24, 2020.

The Diversity Impact Awards™ was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™.  The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. It was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc.

In 2018, PRISM International was acquired by Talent Dimensions to help organizations weave Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DE&I) into the fabric of its culture.  “This can only happen if the organization develops a DE&I strategy aligned to the business strategy and the appropriate structure exists to ensure successful implementation.  Diversity Councils and ERGs (BRGs, Affinity Groups, Networks, etc.) serve as one of the most important levers to drive the tactical execution of that strategy,” shares Lynn Cowart, Principle and Chief Operations Office at Talent Dimensions.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ were reimagined to leverage a data driven and scientifically validated model developed by Dr. Theresa Welbourne, Senior Affiliate Research Scientist at the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations, Will and Maggie Brooke Professor in Entrepreneurship at the University of Alabama, and CEO of eePulse, to ensure buy-in from key stakeholders and drive greater learning.  The awards were segmented to create a level playing field for individual ERGs, enterprise-wide ERG programs and non-ERG Diversity initiatives.  For the second year, we are honoring the important work of Executive Sponsors.

“While we were excited to launch the new Diversity Impact Awards after almost a year of research and gaining input, launching a new awards structure during COVID-19 was challenging to say the least.  We considered taking a hiatus given what organizations were experiencing.  We quickly realized that this work was far too important and the individuals volunteering countless hours to create organizations where ALL people felt engaged, included and that they belong, must be recognized,” said Cile Johnson, Principle and Chief Business Officer at Talent Dimensions. “Our partnership with the USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations further supported the importance of the recognition of leaders and organizations.”

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards recipient rankings will be revealed at USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective (CEO) Organizations ERG Leadership Summit Week October 19 – October 24.

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 25 ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Professional Women in Aviation EBRG
  • American Airlines – Latin Diversity Network EBRG
  • Bank of America – LEAD for Women
  • Blue Cross NC – GlobalNet
  • ChristianaCare – Women’s Employee Network (WEN)
  • Dominion Energy – We3
  • Erie Insurance – Women’s Affinity Group
  • Halliburton – Women Sharing Excellence
  • JetBlue – JetBlue African Diaspora Experience (JADE)
  • Mount Sinai Health System – Heritage of Latino Alliance Employee Resource Group
  • NextEra Energy – African American Employee Professional Group
  • NextEra Energy – Women in Energy
  • Northwestern Mutual – Asian Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Women’s Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Hispanic Employee Resource Group
  • Northwestern Mutual – Mutual disAbility Alliance
  • Northwestern Mutual – Military Veteran Employee Resource Group (MVERG)
  • Novant Health – Women’s Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Persons with Abilities Busines Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Black/African American Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Pride Business Resource Group
  • Novant Health – Veterans’ Business Resource Group
  • Rockwell Automation – Cultures Connected
  • Southern California Edison, Latinos for Engagement Advancement and Development (LEAD)
  • State Street – Professional Women’s Network Massachusetts Chapter (PWN-MA)

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards™ Top 10 Enterprise-Wide ERG Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Abraham’s Tent – Christian, Jewish, and Muslim EBRGs
  • Asurion – Asurion ERGs
  • Bank of America – Bank of America Enterprise ERGs
  • Banner Health – Team Member Resource Group (TMRGs) Launch
  • Cigna – Employee Resource Groups
  • Northern Trust – Northern Trust Business Resource Council Advisory Council (BRCAC)
  • Perdue Farms, Inc. – “Day of Understanding”
  • Southern Company Gas – 2019 ERG Program Expansion/Evolution
  • Tennessee Valley Authority – TVA ERG Collaboration
  • University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center – Diversity Council and Employee Networks

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Top 10 Diversity Action Award recipients in alphabetical order include:

  • American Airlines – Virtual Inclusion Week
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield of Louisiana – Strategic Plan
  • Froedtert Health – Disability Etiquette
  • Halliburton – Focus on Family
  • Mount Sinai Beth Israel – Go Red Event
  • NASCAR – Heritage History Series
  • Novant Health – Health Equity Council
  • Novant Health – Cross Cultural Communications Program
  • Portsmouth Naval Shipyard – Disability Etiquette: Perspective Changing Training
  • Ricoh – International Women’s Day

The 2020 Diversity Impact Awards Executive Sponsor of the Year recipients in alphabetical order:

  • Dominion Energy – Wendy Wellener, Vice President – Shared Services
  • NextEra Energy, Inc. – Kate Stengle, Vice President Internal Audit
  • Northern Trust – Shundrawn Thomas, President of Northern Trust Asset Management (NTAM)
  • Novant Health – Chere Gregory, MD, SVP Chief Health Equity Officer Diversity & Inclusion

About the Diversity Impact Awards™
The Diversity Impact Awards™ program was launched in 2020 and is the next iteration of the ERG & Council Honors Award™.  The ERG & Council Honors Award™ was the first, and until recently, the only annual national award that recognized and honored the outstanding contributions and achievements of ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils.  The new award process leverages a data driven and scientifically validated model to create collective learning within and across organizations.  The honor award was established in 2008 by the Association of ERGs & Councils, a practice group of diversity and inclusion consulting and training firm PRISM International, Inc.

About the ERG & Council Conference™
ERGs and Diversity Councils are vital links for improving organizational results. However, to remain impactful and effective, they need opportunities to increase their skills and knowledge and to learn and share best practices. They need opportunities to network, celebrate and grow. This was the purpose of the first annual conference designed specifically for ERGs, BRGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting http://www.ergcouncilconference.com.

About the Association of ERGs & Councils
The Association of ERGs & Councils is a practice group of PRISM International, Inc. and the premier resource for transforming Employee Resource Groups, Diversity Councils and Employee Network Groups to impact key organizational and business objectives. Learn more by visiting www.ergcouncil.com.

About PRISM International, Inc.
PRISM, a Talent Dimensions company, is a full-service provider of innovative and proven consulting, training and products for leveraging diversity and inclusion, addressing unconscious bias, increasing cross-cultural competencies and creating more effective ERGs and Diversity Councils. Learn more by visiting www.prismdiversity.com.

About USC Marshall School of Business Center for Effective Organizations
Since its founding over 40 years ago, the Center for Effective Organizations (CEO), a research center in the USC Marshall School of Business, is world-renowned for its breakthrough research and insights on organizational performance, effectiveness and talent management. Today, CEO is at the forefront, discovering and creating the latest knowledge in the design and management of organizations for companies that range from mid-sized to the Global 500. CEO’s worldwide network includes research scientists, faculty experts, best-selling authors, and corporate partners. Working together, they provide forward-thinking leaders with trusted insights and the hands-on learning they need to help them solve complex problems and build highly effective, sustainable organizations.


HACU’s virtual Town Hall to focus on the 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education, Oct. 28

The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities will present a Town Hall on “The 2020 Presidential Election: Its Impact on Latinos and Hispanic Higher Education,” Oct. 28, 2020, 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. PT /4:30 – 5:30 p.m. CT /5:30 – 6:30 p.m. ET. The Town Hall is part of its 34th Annual Conference, being offered virtually under the theme, “Championing Hispanic Higher Education: Fostering Excellence and Social Justice,” Oct. 26-28.

The Town Hall will feature a panel of experts who will discuss the 2020 presidential election, and where each candidate stands on key issues, particularly education, and how their policies would impact Latinos in the U.S. The panelists will also analyze the decisions made by the elected candidates regarding elementary, secondary, and higher education and their impact on Hispanic-Serving Institutions, specifically, and the nearly 20 million college students enrolled in higher education nationwide.

The Town Hall will be moderated by Adela de la Torre, Ph.D., president, San Diego State University. Speakers will include: Sonja Diaz, Esq., executive director, University of California Los Angeles, Latino Policy & Politics Initiative; Ted Mitchell, Ph.D., president, American Council on Education; and Mark Hugo Lopez, Ph.D., director, Global Migration and Demography Research, Pew Research Center.

HACU’s premier conference on Hispanic higher education provides a unique forum for the sharing of information and ideas for the best and most promising practices in the education of Hispanics and promotes and expands partnerships and strategic alliances for collaboration between HACU-member institutions and public- and private-sector organizations.

Registration for HACU’s 34th Annual Conference and pre- and post-conference events is available here.

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LULAC Kicks Off Campaign For Hunger Relief Across USA

Nation’s Leading Latino Civil Rights Organization Joins with Promotores Unidos USA to Help Latinos Hard Hit by COVID-19

Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), in partnership with Promotores Unidos USA, today announced a $250,000 hunger relief campaign funded by Corona and Modelo beer brands that will reach several of America’s largest cities where Latino communities have suffered economically, in addition to some of the highest rates of impact from the novel coronavirus.

“LULAC is proud to be part of a wonderful partnership with some of the most well-known brands in the world as well as beloved entertainment giants in music today,” said Sindy Benavides, Chief Executive Officer of LULAC. “Our one goal as a team is to help bring sorely needed food to the tables of as many of the nation’s essential workers in our communities as possible. While others are working day and night to find a vaccine against COVID-19, LULAC is hard at work with Corona and Modelo beer brands and Promotores Unidos USA to do everything we can to bring meals to the families most affected.

The project was created by Promotores Unidos USA and the Corona and Modelo beer brands with the assistance of the ROOX Agency and seeks to impact the most vulnerable. The Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief campaign features artists brought by Promotores Unidos USA to help increase awareness and extend the Latino community’s gratitude to millions of people working daily to keep the country going during COVID-19. The artists would provide recorded messages of encouragement to the community, including reminders on the importance of wearing a mask and social distancing.

“I am so proud to work alongside LULAC, beloved beer brands Corona and Modelo, and various organizations who share the common values of giving and social responsibility. This is the time to show solidarity and support to those who need it the most during frightening and uncertain times,” said Pedro Zamora, President of Promotores Unidos USA.

Partner stores in the campaign include: La Michoacana Meat Market – Dallas and Houston, Texas; Cermak Produce, Super Espiga – Chicago, Illinois; Numero Uno Market – Los Angeles, California.

Together, the Corona and Modelo beer brands will contribute $250,000 to the national Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief campaign, which will go directly to relief efforts supporting families in disproportionately-affected Latino communities in eight major metro areas across the country.

“Our brands have an established history of giving back to the communities where we live and work, including initiatives like this one that provide support for our bar and restaurant partners and their employees,” said John Alvarado, SVP, Brand Marketing Beer Division, Constellation Brands.

“We are honored to have our Corona and Modelo beer brands contribute to the work LULAC and Promotores Unidos are doing to raise awareness of the devastating impact COVID-19 has on the Latino community and help provide direct relief to those most in need during this critical time.”

The Unidos Por Impacto Hunger Relief Project includes New York City, Dallas, Houston, Miami, Chicago, Bakersfield – Tulare, Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay Area. The full $250,000 donation from the Corona and Modelo beer brands will be distributed across these areas to help ensure food security in vulnerable Hispanic populations. Recipients can apply for gift cards which they will be able to cash for food items at tiendas, supermercados and bodegas in their communities. The campaign will also help boost local economies for neighborhood businesses hurt by the pandemic. The project kicks off Saturday, September 5th, and will continue for two months through Thursday, October 15th.

To learn more or to apply for the gift cards, visit lulac.org/unidos.

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American Indian College Fund Announces 2020-21 Student Ambassador Cohort

The American Indian College Fund selected and trained 12 new student ambassadors for its 2020 cohort. Now in its sixth year, the College Fund Student Ambassador Program trains American Indian and Alaska Native students to serve as leaders in their communities, to work to combat stereotypes, and to create greater visibility of Native Americans and an understanding of the importance of their diverse cultures.

With 42% of the Native American population today under the age of 24, the opportunity to educate the next generation of young Native leaders to realize their potential and to advocate for their communities is at a tipping point. Creating greater visibility about the importance of higher education for Native students is crucial to creating a better future for Native peoples and communities. College Fund student ambassadors promote higher education and visibility of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN) and inspiring the next generation of Native students in media interviews, at cultural events, in their communities, and on their campuses.

The 2020 cohort also received advocacy training to help them spearhead engagement and action for issues impacting Native communities.

This year the multi-day training program was moved online, still providing student ambassadors with leadership development, public speaking, interviewing, writing, and social media training in an interactive modular format.

The virtual format allowed attendees the additional opportunity to participate in conversations about career planning and persistence with professionals in their fields. Special guests included veteran Native American actor Zahn McClarnon (recent credits include television shows Barkskins, Longmire, Fargo, and Westworld and the movie Dr. Sleep) who was joined by his mother, a longtime professional educator; and Kevin McDermott, a retired NFL long snapper who played for the San Francisco 49ers, Denver Broncos, Baltimore Ravens, and Minnesota Vikings before leaving the NFL to launch his dream career in finance.

The 2020-21 American Indian College Fund Student Ambassadors are:

  • Lyndsey Blanco (Tlingit and Haida Central Council), a business administration major at Ilisagvik College in Alaska;
  • Kimberly Blevins (Mandan Hidatsa Arikara Nation), an environmental science master’s program student at Sitting Bull College in North Dakota;
  • Natasha Goldtooth (Diné), an agroecology/environmental science major at Diné College in Arizona;
  • Spring Grey Bear (Standing Rock Sioux Tribe), a business administration major at United Tribes Technical College in North Dakota;
  • Kenwa Kravitz (Pit River/Wintu), a native studies leadership major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • Emily Lockling (Fond du Lac Band of Superior Chippewa), an environmental science major at Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College in Minnesota;
  • Jacob McArthur (White Earth Ojibwe Nation), a business administration major at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Tori McConnell (Yurok Tribe), a neurology, physiology, and behavior major at the University of California Davis in California;
  • Jamison Nessman (White Earth Nation), a pre-medicine student at Bemidji State University in Minnesota;
  • Chandra Norton (Hoopa Vakkey Tribe), a community advocate and responsive education in human services major at Northwest Indian College in Washington;
  • David Plant (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes), a business management major at Salish Kootenai College in Montana.
  • Amanda Ruiz (Sicangu Lakota), a natural science degree and pre-engineering major at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota;
  • Christopher Villaruel (Ajumawi/Pit River), a Forestry Hydrology Major at Humbodlt State University in California;
  • Lester Wells (Crow Creek Sioux Tribe), a Lakota leadership and management master’s program major with an education administration emphasis at Oglala Lakota College in South Dakota; and
  • Jade Yazzie (Diné), a food and nutrition in dietetics major at Montana State University in Montana.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


LULAC Virtual Summit Sucess Is A Preview To Future Advocacy

Nation’s Oldest and Largest Latino Civil Rights Organization Says COVID-19 Speeds Up a Move Toward More Use of Technology

Washington, DC – The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) 2020 Virtual Summit, “All for One, One for All: United in Action to Transform America” drew the largest continuous online audience in the organization’s history during nearly 30 hours of programming and more than 80 content experts, speakers and elected officials.

“Our analysis of the summit results clearly shows that this is a step in the right direction,” says Sindy Benavides, National Chief Executive Officer. “From the programmatic perspective of LULAC’s mission, we were able to touch more people in a concentrated period of time while being very cognizant of their safety and well-being given the coronavirus. We don’t know how long COVID-19 will last but LULAC is well poised to accelerate and amplify advocacy using virtual platforms to continue our momentum during a very important time of social change. As LULAC continues to protect and defend our community in every aspect, we will use technology for good to transform the way we connect and take actions,” she added.

The summit’s first address was by House Majority Whip James Clyburn whose stirring words reminded attendees of the “calling to serve, not for self, but others” while the “duty of our freedom is to lift those most oppressed” as he saluted LULAC’s legacy of leadership. Following his address, the plenary session that followed highlighted the need for coalitions as one of the most important tools when confronting institutional bias and racism. The conversation featured a powerhouse of the nation’s leading social justice leaders: LULAC National President Domingo Garcia, YWCA National Chief Executive Officer Alejandra Castillo, NAACP President and CEO Derrick Johnson, National Urban League President and CEO Marc Morial, and Anti-Defamation League (ADL) CEO and National Director Jonathan Greenblatt.

“Nothing is going to stop LULAC right now,” says Domingo Garcia, National President. “We don’t have time to wait as Jose and Maria are getting infected and dying from COVID-19 while keeping the country going. Social justice is not a black-only or brown-only problem. It is everyone’s problem because this country needs our labor today as much as it did in the past but now we have the laws, the votes and the will to use both to create systemic changes. This summit shows Latinos are technology-savvy and we can use it both as a tool and a weapon to defend ourselves from those who try to do our communities harm,” he added.

This session was followed by examining the effects of inequities for Latinos in accessing quality healthcare even for essential COVID-19 services, shifting immigration policies including family separations to denial of protections for asylum-seekers and increased swift deportations, plus a timely discussion on the economic impact the pandemic is having on Latino families and how financial literacy is vital.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi opened day two of the LULAC Summit with a call to action for the country’s 60-million Latinos with a challenge to confront long-held racial and gender exclusionary practices, replacing these with a new wave of opportunities for every man, woman and child in America. That message was affirmed by former HUD Secretary and presidential candidate Julian Castro who stated change must be accelerated and called November 3rd a “tipping point moment” in modern history for the United States.

Another historic moment for LULAC was taking a hard look at safety in the military ranks for Latino men and women. U.S. Secretary of the Army Ryan McCarthy told the audience that the death of Army Pvt. Vanessa Guillen at Fort Hood, Texas, was tragedy that must now be a call to action to ensure that women in uniform as well as men are not the victims of sexual harassment, abuse or worse. Secretary McCarthy pointed to the creation of an independent committee to examine reports of Military Sexual Trauma (MST) as evidence that the Army supports increased oversight and investigations when warranted. Although this is a first step, LULAC is also calling for a Congressional hearing on soldier Guillen and the issue of harassment across all branches in the military.

The panel discussion that followed included Captain (Ret.) Quetta Rodriguez, USMC, Colonel (Ret.) Michelle Hernandez de Fraley Ph.D., U.S. Army, Colonel (Ret.) Lisa Carrington Firmin, USAF and Lt. Colonel (Ret.) Carrie F. Ricci, U.S. Army.

Equally important was the panel discussion on the importance of Latinos having access to technology and broadband internet service during COVID-19 restrictions limiting face-to-face contacts in schools, government services and other daily needs. The day’s culminating session was an informative and insightful examination of the state of our environment and its impact on communities of color in health, economics and overall quality of life. Also, the panel brought forth a future generations’ perspective to the conversation and the challenge that present day political and social leaders must accept as more of the effects of climate change become irreversible.

An inspiring presentation followed by ABC News Correspondent John Quinoñes who shared the personal challenges he overcame to achieve a 35-year career on the network. Today, he is one of American television’s most recognized news talents as creator and anchor of “What would you do?” The program allows us see ourselves the way others may.

“Day two of the virtual summit was really about awakening to the fallacy that we can accept change incrementally when every indicator clearly shows there are imperatives to confront and time is not our friend,” says Benavides. “From Speaker Pelosi and Secretary Castro’s powerful messages of putting democracy into action to danger in the ranks for Latino servicemen and women and then, the real and practical implications of technology, environmental justice in our daily lives and one journalist’s life work to uplift the Latino story. LULAC’s focus has never been clearer, our resolve stronger and the moment to act more necessary than now,” she adds.

The climax of LULAC’s three-day virtual summit was the participation of Jill Biden, former Second Lady and wife of Democratic presidential candidate, Joe Biden. “I guarantee you, Latinos will have a place at the table,” she told the national audience referring to a Biden-Harris Administration following the upcoming presidential election. Dr. Biden was critical of how Latinos have fared during COVID-19 suffering disproportionate health and economic losses and assured the nation’s Latinos and communities of color that access to affordable health care continues to be a worthwhile and necessary goal for America.

“LULAC leads, never follows because we are about taking action,” says Garcia. “No government agency whether federal, state or local has done what we have during this virtual summit of making sure the Latino community has the information they need to survive. It is wrong for them to be criticized for getting infected from COVID-19 when it’s President Trump forcing them to go into packing plants dealing with the virus but then says he has no responsibility for them getting sick. It is wrong for Latino kids to fail in school but then we fail to make sure they have access to the internet to access online learning and study at home during this pandemic and not fall behind. And it is wrong for our community to be told you don’t vote but then we see Republican governors and other elected officials doing voter suppression to block our votes. This is the first LULAC virtual summit and we promise, to continue to stay connected to garner action,” adds Garcia.

To see an encore presentation of the 2020 LULAC Virtual Summit, which was a 100% Latino production, please see: www.lulac.org/summit2020/


Trans and non-binary people in STEM: Apply for a Ben Barres Fellowship, deadline 9/30/2020

NOGLSTP is proud to offer the Ben Barres Fellowship. The fellowship is a $2000-$5000 award for professional development of trans, intersex, and non-binary graduate students and post-doctoral fellows in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM).

The Ben Barres Fellowship is a merit-based award, and the support provided is intended, broadly construed, for the recipient’s professional development. Examples of eligible purposes include research support; conference/workshop attendance, or research travel; equipment/supplies; research assistant or translation services; and/or other professional uses. The fund is not intended to support personal expenses unrelated to research, such as food or rent.

To apply for The Ben Barres Fellowship, applicants will provide a brief description of their current research and research/career goals, a 2-3 paragraph funding proposal, a personal statement, their CV, and answers to demographics questions. Each application must have one letter of support, which may be written by any of the following: PI, Mentor, Advisor, or Colleague. The letter of support will be submitted by the recommender (not the applicant). Applications will be evaluated on clarity of written proposal, impact of proposed funding on applicant’s career, contributions to STEM and LGBTQ+ communities, and strength of support letter. If awarded funds, the recipient will upload a brief report and expense receipts within 6 months of receiving the award.

Apply here: https://www.noglstp.org/programs-projects/ben-barres-fellowship/

Recipients of the fellowship will retain the option of remaining anonymous in public announcements of the award. Alternatively, they may choose to be publicly acknowledged in NOGLSTP’s publicity campaigns. Awards will range from $2000 to $5000 per recipient. Application deadline for the first round of awards is September 30,2020. Award decisions will be announced the first week of December. If any money is left, there will be additional rounds of awards until all the money has been awarded.

About NOGLSTP

NOGLSTP was established in 1980, incorporated in the State of California in 1991, and was granted IRS 501 (c) 3 non-profit status in 1992. NOGLSTP’s mission is to educate the scientific and general communities about the presence and accomplishments of LGBT individuals in STEM professions. NOGLSTP presents educational symposia and workshops nationwide. NOGLSTP fosters dialog with other professional societies, academia, and industry to facilitate diversity and inclusion in the workplace. NOGLSTP is an affiliate of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, is a participating professional society member of MentorNet®, a sustaining member of the National Postdoctoral Association, a partner with the Higher Education Recruitment Consortium (HERC) and a founding member of the E-Week Diversity Council.

For more information, visit the website at www.noglstp.org


Cheryl Crazy Bull, President of American Indian College Fund, Receives Legacy Award from Working Mother Media

Denver, Colo.—July 30, 2020– Working Mother Media presented Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund President, with its Legacy Award on Wednesday, July 22, during its Multicultural Women’s Conference, which was hosted virtually due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Working Mother Media established the Legacy Award in 2005 to honor one extraordinary individual for her inspiration, dedication, and contributions to the advancement of multicultural women in the workplace and beyond. In particular, the organization honors women from public and non-profit sectors for their outstanding work that creates opportunity and well-being on many levels for women, girls, and communities. Cheryl Crazy Bull was selected for the award because of her extensive experience with the tribal college movement and her tireless work in supporting Native student success and education. Her long history of education, activism, and community growth has been documented and exemplary, and has created a lasting legacy built on advancing Native voices that will continue far into the future.

Subha V. Barry, President, Working Mother Media, said, “This award acknowledges the incredible and courageous women who are out there in the field doing the hard work and making a difference, being mentors, leaders and examples to others—and who are creating a legacy and vision for future women.”

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “Receiving this award is an honor that goes beyond me. It is an award that I accept on behalf of all indigenous women who want to be seen, those who have gone into the spirit world who we must remember, those who are here now and need our support, and those who are coming who need our seventh generation vision. Many of our Tribal nations survived because women adapted to the new world, kept our traditions alive, and passed our knowledge to our children. I want to recognize my colleagues at the American Indian College Fund, and especially to honor the women of the tribal college movement today, the women who helped found our tribal colleges and universities and who served and serve as presidents and as faculty and staff, the women who are our students.”

According to the Working Mother Research Institute’s “On the Verge” study, 50% of multicultural working women considered leaving their companies within a year. On top of bias and lack of support, multicultural women are also disproportionately impacted socio-economically, and struggle with building strategic relationship capital that would elevate their careers. During the pandemic, multicultural women are faced with even greater challenges than before.

The Multicultural Women’s Conference gives working women the tools needed to lead effectively in trying times. While studies show that women of color bring higher levels of education, ambition, and diverse ideas to the workplace, the conference tasked organizations and individuals to explore ways to ensure talented multicultural women stay engaged and connected while being inclusive and helping them to build networks, new skills, and cultural leadership competencies in today’s environment.

About Working Mother Media— Working Mother Media’s (WMM) mission is to serve as a champion of culture change. WMM publishes Working Mother magazine and its companion website, workingmother.com, which is the only national magazine for career-committed mothers. WMM also produces 20-plus events dedicated to the advancement of women, work and life, and helping organizations build inclusive workplace cultures.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Photo: Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO, American Indian College Fund


American Indian College Fund Awarded $50,000 Rise Prize

The American Indian College Fund was awarded a $50,000 Rise Prize to create both a higher education cohort of Native student mothers and programming that is responsive to their unique needs as college students. The program will be called Ina Wa Wounspe Pi,” Lakota for Mothers Who Are Learning.

The “Rise Prize” is a collective effort between Imaginative Futures, the Lumina Foundation and ten partner organizations focused on the success of parent students in higher education. Organizations based in the United States of any age, size, or type that are currently working on direct impact initiatives for student parents and other students, including high education institutions, for-profit companies, and non-profit organizations like the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) were eligible to apply for the competitive prize.

The College Fund was one of eight of 383 applicants that was chosen to receive $50,000 for their efforts programming efforts in working with student parents.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “On behalf of the College Fund, I appreciate the opportunity through the Rise Prize to focus resources on supporting student mothers. While all parents and guardians are valued by us, we welcome resources to help mothers pursue their educational dreams. They inspire us and with coaching and programs directed at their success, we look forward to their bright futures.”

With the Rise Prize, the American Indian College Fund will be collecting data on the cohort’s outcomes to examine other cohorts that can be created to meet student coaching needs.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

Ricky D. Smith of Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport Elected National Chair of AMAC’s Board of Directors

The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is pleased to announce the election of Ricky D. Smith, Chief Executive Officer of BWI Marshall Airport as the National Chair of its Board of Directors.

A 30-year transportation professional, Smith was appointed to lead the Maryland Aviation Administration (MAA) in 2015, where he oversees the management and operations of BWI Marshall Airport, Martin State Airport, and regional aviation activities throughout the State of Maryland. He has also served as Chief Executive Officer of the Cleveland Airport System, as well as leadership roles in the private sector with recognizable companies such as International Business Machines, H&R Block Business Services, and The May Company.

Smith’s experience and accolades make him an ideal leader to navigate AMAC through the current social and business climate. He has been recognized as ‘Man of the Year’ by Women Transportation Seminar, ‘Power 10 CEO’ by the Baltimore Business Journal (2018), ‘People Who Move America’ by the Boys Scouts of America (2018), ‘Thomas G. Newsome Founder’s Leadership Award’ by the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (2018), ‘Influential Marylander’ by The Daily Record (2017), the Maryland Washington Minority Companies Association ‘Black History Hero’ award (2017), ‘Most Influential CEO in Northeast Ohio’ by Crain’s Magazine (2014, 2013), ‘National Executive of the Year’ by the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials (2010), and ‘Congressional Achievement Award’ from Congressman Elijah Cummings (2006).

“During this period of unprecedented public health challenges and heightened awareness around social injustices, I could not be prouder and more humbled by the AMAC community’s confidence in my leadership,” Executive Director Smith said. “I am joined by a Board of Directors that is committed to addressing the myriad of challenges affecting women and minorities in the aviation industry.

“We are keen on our charge to reposition AMAC as one of the more influential and consequential trade organizations in the industry as we enhance our response to the membership, strengthen our alliance with like-minded organizations, and expand our connection with the many under-represented minority-owned businesses and professionals across the industry,” he said. “I look forward to leading through these challenges and opportunities.”

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC)
The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education, and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit www.amac-org.com

Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit Recap

Inaugural Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit Featuring Fat Joe, Dascha Polanco, John Leguizamo, Luis Guzman, Dolores Huerta And Others Delivered Record Numbers – Follow-Up Event Planned For Hispanic Heritage Month

NGL Collective’s Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit was the largest virtual gathering of Latinx influencers, content creators, entrepreneurs, media and entertainment innovators ever assembled. Grounded by NGL’s #UnidosTogether initiative aimed at being a force for good in the Latinx community, the FREE half-day virtual summit took place on Wednesday, July 1st and represented a massive opportunity for brands to meaningfully connect with the Latinx audience during COVID recovery, while actively participating in the important conversation surrounding Black and Brown communities.

Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit featured influencers, tastemakers, content creators, celebrities, executives and entrepreneurs and proudly shined a light on Latinx frontline heroes and small business owners alike. Roundtables, Keynotes and Break-Out sessions covered topics spanning Activism, TV & Film, Media & Marketing, Music, Social Influencers and more wrapped in the positive energy with which Hispanicize is synonymous.  Popular TV and Radio personalities Jessica Flores (@YoJessicaFlores) and Enrique Sapene (@EnriqueSapene), brought their original styles and passion for Hispanicize and #UnidosTogether as co-hosts.

Speakers Included:  Fat Joe (Rapper/Actor), John Leguizamo (Actor, Activist & NGL Partner), Residente (Rapper & Advocate For Human Rights), Luis Guzman (Actor, Activist), Dolores Huerta (Legendary Civil Rights Activist, American Labor Leader), Dascha Polanco (Actor, In The Upcoming ‘In The Heights’), Diane Guerrero (Actor, Orange Is The New Black), Tatiana Hazel (Singer, Songwriter & Producer), Julissa Bermudez (TV Personality & Host), Gloria Calderon Kellett (Showrunner, One Day At A Time), Luis Guzman (Actor & Activist), Beatriz Acevedo (Entrepreneur, Cultural Strategist & Social Advocate), Yvette Pena (VP, Multicultural Leadership, AARP), Esperanza Teasdale (VP & General Manager, PepsiCo Beverages North America), Margie Bravo (Multicultural Shopper & Marketing Strategist, Nestle), Maria Teresa Kumar (Founder & President, Voto Latino), Monica Style Muse (Fashion & Beauty Blogger), Yarel Ramos (TV Personality & Host), Andrea Chediak (TV Journalist & Mom Influencer), Sandy Bodeau (Siramara) (TV Personality & Mom Influencer), Elisamar Rosado (Fashion & Mom Blogger), Jesus Revulcaba (Owner & Creative Director, Paper Tacos), Marcela Arrieta (Founder, Majestic Bliss Soaps), Paola Ramos (Journalist), Kim Guerra (Brown Badass Bonita – Activist & Author), Ana Flores (Founder & CEO, We All Grow Latina Network), RaqC (TV & Radio Personality / Entrepreneur, Luis Miranda Jr. (Founding Partner, MirRam Group), DJ Vinnie Mack (DJ), Mario Selman (Social Influencer), Xime Ponch (Social Influencer), Rico Swann & Daniel Manhattan (Founders, Lemonade Stand NY), Rosaura Quinteros (Orlando Health Dr. P. Phillips Hospital – LatinXLNCE Honoree), Dr. Ramon Tallaj & Dr. Yomaris Peña (Somos Community Care – Latin XLNCE Honorees), and others to be announced.

Sponsors Included: PepsiCo, Google, Nielsen and Bumble

Event Highlights Included: LatinXCLNCE Awards (Honoring Latinx COVID-19 frontline heroes), Latinx Small Business Spotlights (Inspiring stories of Latinx entrepreneurs pivoting their businesses during the pandemic), Mercadito Virtual by Molcajete Dominguero (Featuring 30+ Latinx small businesses virtually pitching their products and services) and a Special Musical Performance (Featuring Indie-pop break-out artist, Tatiana Hazel).

The Hispanicize #UnidosTogether Virtual Summit attracted over 7,300 attendees, who along with others generated upwards of 43 million impressions in support of the event across their social media footprints before, during and afterwards. Building off of the success of the first virtual summit, a follow-up event has already been scheduled for Thursday, October 15th as part of Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations representing the 11th annual Hispanicize since its creation over a decade ago.

Co-founded by actor John Leguizamo, NGL Collective is a pioneer of new media and entertainment that connects advertisers and New Generation Latinx (NGLs) across platforms in-language, in-culture, and in-context. NGL acquired Hispanicize last year, and presented the iconic event for FREE and in a virtual format for the first time ever.  To see the replay, visit www.Hispanicize.com.


American Indian College Fund Statement: Re-Name Mascots to End Harmful Stereotypes

#TheTimeIsNow for racist sports team names and mascots to be renamed. The American Indian College Fund appreciates its long-time mission supporters, FedEx, Nike, and Walmart. They have chosen to stand alongside indigenous groups across the United States to amplify our voices and to call upon the Washington NFL team to change its name. We are proud to call you our allies.

Indigenous people are a vibrant part of both our nation’s history and modern-day America. Eliminating mascots that reinforce harmful stereotypes sends a powerful message to our children that we value all histories, cultures, and perspectives, helping to foster confidence, growth, and success from kindergarten to college graduation and to build a better future for all. #ChangeTheName. #NotYourMascot.

Cheryl_Crazy_BullCheryl Crazy Bull
President and CEO, American Indian College Fund

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


AT&T Contributes $350K to American Indian College Fund

Charity Offering Native Student Scholarships and College Readiness Programs to Increase Number of Native Americans With A Higher Education

Denver, Colo., June 30, 2020—COVID-19 had a more devastating impact on Native American communities than others. Because only 14% of American Indians and Alaska Natives have a college degree—less than half of that of other groups, the American Indian College Fund was understandably worried about the impact of the virus on students entering college for the first time in the fall and the persistence of those already in college. Thanks to the continued support of AT&T with a $350,000 contribution to the American Indian College Fund’s Braided Success: Fostering Native Student Success from High School to College and Career program, high school and college students in the Tohono O’odham Community College in Sells, Arizona and College of Muscogee Nation in Okmulgee, Oklahoma communities continued and will continue to be supported in their quest for a higher education.

The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) created two interlocking programs with the grant to increase Native student access to higher education and success.

Braiding Support will provide $100,000 in scholarship support over the period of one year to American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) students from Oklahoma and Arizona seeking to attend a tribal college (TCU) or mainstream institution located in their home states.

Braiding Success will develop partnerships between the Tohono O’oodham Community College (Sells, Ariz.) and the College of Muscogee Nation (Okmulgee, Okla.) and the local high schools serving their tribal communities, and employers.

In the first three years of the program, the College of Muscogee Nation partnered with three local high schools and offered three dual enrollment programs. Of the 157 Native high school student participants, 33% took college courses through the dual-enrollment program. Participants also enjoyed college visits.

Similarly, TOCC partnered with two local high schools to launch its S.T.A.R.T. program—Students Thriving, Achieving, and Rising Together. Thirty-eight percent of all partner high school students are served by S.T.A.R.T., and of that number, 42% of the students participated in the dual-enrollment program with TOCC. Students also enjoyed after-school programs and tutoring sessions.

The result was that students who participated in the TCU’s programs graduated from high school at rates more than 20% higher than Native Americans nationally.

By continuing the strong relationships forged between college the high schools and TCUs, the Braiding Success initiative also better prepares students who transition to college for an easier transition to higher education and employment.

Program managers at the TCUs are looking at ways to navigate the landscape with COVID-19, ensuring that students continue to have access to the program opportunities in a safe way to maintain the health of Native students and their communities. Program activities include college and career fairs, sponsored visits to employers to explore career opportunities with working professionals in students’ fields of interest and integrating coaching for student’s college and career success.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “AT&T is on the leading edge of engaging best practices supporting career pathways for indigenous students through its support of the College Fund’s student success programming. This partnership builds on our shared vision of helping students achieve their dreams.”

“AT&T has a long history of supporting initiatives that help Native American students graduate from high school and succeed in college and career,” said Tom Brooks, vice president of external affairs, AT&T. “We’re proud to further our commitment to Native communities with this contribution and connect Native youth to educational pathways that lead to careers in the 21st century workforce.”

About Philanthropy & Social Innovation at AT&T — AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. We have a long history of investing in projects that create learning opportunities, promote academic and economic achievement, and address community needs. Our AT&T Aspire initiative uses innovation in education to drive student success in school and beyond. With a financial commitment of $550 million since 2008, AT&T is leveraging technology, relationships and social innovation to help all students make their biggest dreams a reality.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


United Health Foundation Grants $430K to American Indian College Fund to Expand Tribal Scholars Program

The United Health Foundation (UHF) is increasing its support of the American Indian College Fund’s United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program to ensure Native American communities have access to urgently needed health care with a $430,000 grant to provide 13 scholarships for American Indian and Alaska Natives studying in the health and dental fields. The COVID-19 crisis has highlighted the opportunity to address disparities in access to health care for underserved populations by increasing the number of minority health care providers to serve their communities.

Studies show that American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) people lag behind other Americans with regard to health status. As a result, AIAN people born today have a life expectancy that is 5.5 years less than the U.S. population in all other races (73.0 years to 78.5 years, respectively), and AIAN people continue to die at higher rates than other Americans from diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and chronic lower respiratory diseases, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health. And today’s COVID-19 pandemic means Native people with chronic, underlying health conditions are at even greater risk.

Lack of access to a dentist is also related to health problems. Periodontal disease (gum infection) is associated with increased risks for cancer and cardiovascular disease. Studies also show that people with poor oral health and bad teeth are often stigmatized socially and when individuals are seeking employment, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

One major reason for health disparities in Native communities includes an insufficient supply of providers of health care services.

“The American Indian College Fund is a longstanding partner we are honored to support – together, we are working to improve the capacity of the health care system to ensure Native communities receive the best quality care,” said Tracy Malone, president of the United Health Foundation. “Through this ongoing partnership, we are living our mission of building healthier communities by developing a modern health workforce that is culturally competent and can provide the right care at the right time.”

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund, said, “The College Fund appreciates that during this pandemic United Health Foundation is continuing its commitment to our scholars. Tribal people use our traditional ways of knowing and good relationships to support public health and the guidelines that will get us through this crisis. Together we are paving a healthy path for individuals and their families.”

The goal of the American Indian College Fund’s United Health Foundation Tribal Scholars Program is to develop the next generation of Native health care providers to serve their communities with personalized, culturally competent care. The United Health Foundation has increased its support for the program by $70,000 this year to provide support to additional students.

Rising sophomores who are studying to be a primary care physician, nurse, physician’s assistant, mental and behavioral health worker, dentist, or pharmacist are eligible for the scholarships, which total over $7,700 per year per student and are renewable for up to three years if students maintain their studies and a 3.0 grade point average. To apply for scholarships, please visit collegefund.org/scholarships.

About the United Health Foundation — Through collaboration with community partners, grants and outreach efforts, the United Health Foundation works to improve our health system, build a diverse and dynamic health workforce and enhance the well-being of local communities. The United Health Foundation was established by UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) in 1999 as a not-for-profit, private foundation dedicated to improving health and health care. To date, the United Health Foundation has committed more than $500 million to programs and communities around the world. We invite you to learn more at UnitedHealthFoundation.org.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $208 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


News for NGLCC

NGLCC logo
HELPING THE LGBT BUSINESS COMMUNITY THROUGH THE COVID-19 CRISIS

In our recent email blast we shared that NGLCC will always continue to work for you and our communities. We ask all stakeholders to check NGLCC’s social media pages for updates on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

We encourage all stakeholders to regularly check our landing page for Coronavirus relief and other essential updates: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). There you will find resources from the Small Business Administration, as well as NGLCC Corporate Partners, to assist small businesses with their recovery.

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.

Special Resources:

1) NGLCC COVID-19 Resource Hub for the LGBT Business Community

2) LGBTBE Business Webinars And Video Resources During Covid-19

This page is dedicated to our network of exceptional, innovative Certified LGBT Business Enterprise® (Certified LGBTBE®) suppliers in the NGLCC network. Here you will find information on business development webinars and trainings; online matchmakers, both B2B and corporate; support with drafting capability statements and RFPs; and much, much more to help our businesses and community stay strong and ready for the year ahead.

For funding and economic relief information, please visit our hub: NGLCC Guidance for Businesses and Employers to Plan and Respond to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Additionally, many NGLCC local affiliate chambers have regional information an economic recovery opportunities available. To find your closest local affiliate, click here.


Henry Luce Foundation Grants $250,000 to American Indian College Fund to Assist Tribal College Faculty with Remote Instruction During Covid-19 Crisis

The Henry Luce Foundation granted the American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) $250,000 to provide faculty at tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) with the technology and support they need to make the transition to remote instruction during the Covid-19 crisis. TCUs are located on or near Indian reservations primarily in rural communities serving predominately Native American populations. It is not just Native students but entire Native communities, faculty included, that often lack the technological tools and resources to make the transition to on-line learning.

As the virus outbreak impacted Native communities, the American Indian College Fund was concerned that it has the potential to reverse education attainment. Yet now more than ever educated citizens are needed as health care workers, social workers, teachers, and more.

TCUs are geographically and culturally diverse that share common goals such as integrating cultural values and connection to land into curriculum and pedagogy while emphasizing community outreach and education rooted in tribal identity and practice. In 2017, over 11% of American Indian students studying at a U.S. two-or four-year public or private not-for-profit postsecondary institution attended one of the 35 accredited TCUs. Most TCUs operate much like community colleges while providing culturally and place-based higher education for Native American students and community members.

The link between a TCU education and community progress was shown in The Alumni of Tribal Colleges and Universities Better Their Communities survey report published in September 2019 by Gallup and the American Indian College Fund. The report was the result of a survey of 5,000 American Indian College Fund scholars about the value of an education rooted in Native American values. The results show that 74% of TCU graduates surveyed forged careers serving their communities and societies, TCU graduates (43%) say they are more than twice as likely as American Indian/Alaska Native graduates of non-TCUs (21%) and college graduates nationally (18%) to have had a professor that cared about them as a person and excited them about learning and a mentor that encouraged them, and reported nearly twice as much as graduates nationwide that they are thriving financially, socially, and in their communities and careers.

Thanks to the Henry Luce Foundation’s gift, the College Fund provided TCUs with direct technology and software support such as new laptops, computer upgrades, microphones, cameras, and Internet connectivity as well as  support for online teaching, learning, and student engagement, including software, Learning Management System training, and assistance through an institutional online course delivery consultant. As the Covid19 situation continues, TCU faculty are now armed with the tools they need to ensure that their work continues uninterrupted.

“We’re pleased to support the College Fund’s efforts to help tribal colleges continue their critical education work during this very challenging time,” said Sean T. Buffington, Luce Foundation Vice President.

Cheryl Crazy Bull, President and CEO of the American Indian College Fund said, “We deeply appreciate the support of the Henry Luce Foundation in their unique commitment to TCU faculty. Our faculty are often tribal citizens and they are definitely all members of tribal communities, so they experience this crisis in the same ways as their students. The Foundation’s support is uplifting to TCU faculty and the students they educate.”

About The Henry Luce Foundation — The Henry Luce Foundation seeks to enrich public discourse by promoting innovative scholarship, cultivating new leaders, and fostering international understanding. The Foundation advances its mission through grantmaking and leadership programs in the fields of Asia, higher education, religion and theology, art, and public policy.

Established in 1936 by Henry R. Luce, the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Time, Inc., the Foundation’s earliest work honored his parents, missionary educators in China. The Foundation’s programs today reflect the value Mr. Luce placed on learning, leadership, and long-term commitment in philanthropy.

About the American Indian College Fund – Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years.  The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221.8 million since its inception.  The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers.  The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.


NMSDC – A Message From The President

Like everyone in the network, NMSDC’s national office is innovating every day to keep our mission and our work moving forward during the COVID-19 virus emergency.

Take a look at this new update from NMSDC President/CEO Adrienne C. Trimble about how the NMSDC is working in this environment – and how that is reshaping our plans for 2020.

NMSDC is mobilizing on the virtual level. Our national office and our regional affiliates are all operating remotely, in safety and security, but we are still conducting business as usual. We are here for you, as always.

We hope you are participating in our new, weekly virtual Town Halls – online every Thursday afternoon. Join us this week for our live stream on YouTube: How CPOs Are Responding: The Corporate Perspective on the COVID-19 Business Challenges.
Technology is allowing NMSDC to keep the conversation going between MBEs and corporate members, even as we are all isolated. Engagement so far in the Town Halls has been vigorous, thought-provoking, and helpful in these difficult days. Stay tuned to your email and social media for more information on these can’t-miss events.

Sadly, as you know, the health emergency has forced the postponement of Leadership Week and the Leadership Awards gala. We hope to reschedule or otherwise make the planned content and meetings available to you.

We are also monitoring developments to see how they might affect our “destination” events later in 2020 – notably, the Program Managers’ Seminar July 14-16 in Orlando, and the annual Conference and Business Opportunity Exchange October 25-28 in Phoenix.

We will keep you apprised of developments as they occur.

Staying in touch is vital during this crisis. Never has it been more important for all of us to remember that, even from a distance …
#WeAreNMSDC!


An Important PSA Message Regarding Covid-19 From Notah Begay III

Here is the list of athletes that will be sending out PSAs this week.
We are using the following hashtag
#ProtectOurCommunitiesStayAtHome

Committed Athletes
Shy LeBeau, Champion Boxer, Navajo/Sioux
Lauren Schad, Professional Volleyball, Cheyenne River Sioux
Temryss Lane, Former Professional Soccer and TV analyst, Lummi Nation
Lindy Waters III, OSU Basketball, Kiowa/Cherokee
Jacoby Ellsbury, professional baseball & world series champion, CRIT/Navajo
Lyle Thompson, World’s best lacrosse player, Onondaga Nation
Jordan Nolan, professional hockey&Stanley Cup Champion, First Nations Canada
Gabby Lemieux, professional golfer, Shoshone-Paiute


Carly Bad Heart Bull Named Executive Director of Native Ways Federation, Inc.

Longmont, Colo., March 25, 2020 — Carly Bad Heart Bull (Bdewakantunwan Dakota/Muskogee Creek and a citizen of the Flandreau Santee Sioux Tribe in South Dakota) was named Executive Director of the Native Ways Federation (NWF), Inc., an organization uniting non-profit organizations to better serve and create awareness of American Indian communities across the United States. She comes to NWF from the Bush Foundation, where she served as the Native Nations Activities Manager working with Indigenous nations and communities since 2014. Her service area encompassed Minnesota, North and South Dakota, and the 23 tribal nations within the region.

Carly has a background in law, and prior to joining the Bush Foundation she was an Assistant County Attorney for the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office (Minneapolis, Minnesota) in its child protection division. She also taught the Dakota language to early childhood students in South Minneapolis. She serves as vice chairwoman of the board of a local non-profit and Indigenous farm, Dream of Wild Health, and on the board of Native Americans in Philanthropy. In 2018, Carly was named an “Unsung Hero” of Minnesota by local media outlet City Pages for her instrumental work on reclaiming the Dakota name of Minneapolis’ largest lake (formerly Lake Calhoun) to Bde Maka Ska. In 2019, she was selected by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a Community Leadership Network Fellow, a program for leaders across the country working to create transformational change toward a more equitable society for all.
Sarah EchoHawk, Chief Executive Officer of the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), said, “Speaking on behalf of the seven founding member organizations of the Native Ways Federation, we are so pleased to have Carly Bad Heart Bull as our new Executive Director. She has excelled at strategic leadership during her tenure at the Bush Foundation and is well-positioned to lead the Native Ways Federation into the future. Carly has a demonstrated track record in initiating and leading change to effectively elevate the visibility of Native communities within the philanthropic sector. During the board’s search process, her integrity, passion, and commitment to Native people was clear. We are excited by her vision for the organization and are looking forward to all that we will accomplish as an organization under her leadership.”

Carly, whose legal education focused on civil rights, made the transition from law to philanthropy because, “My legal career exposed me to the systemic issues that our communities face from a different perspective. I was working within a system that wasn’t set up to serve our people but was in fact intentionally set up to disenfranchise us.” Yet her legal education was vital to her work in the non-profit sector. “The experience taught me how to speak a new language—the language of law and how to navigate systems of power. I learned how to be an interpreter of sorts.”

Her legal skills and experience enabled her to learn “another system and a new language, again with the goal of better serving my people.” She added, “These experiences taught me that interpretation is important; however, we also need to be moving toward building a common language. Institutional philanthropy is evolving from a transactional to a relational practice. More foundation leaders and staff are becoming interested in building relationships and engaging with the communities they serve.”

Throughout Carly’s career spanning from education to law to philanthropy, she says she sought opportunities to build and use her skills and experiences to better serve Native people. She sees her new role at NWF as a natural progression toward that end, using the community problem-solving and relationship-building skills she gained at the Bush Foundation.

“As Native people and sovereign nations we have the answers to address the issues our communities face. However, we haven’t always had access to the proper resources to take appropriate action. As a funder, my role has been to build relationships in and with communities, as well as to learn how to effectively translate their needs to leaders in philanthropy. As Executive Director of NWF, I will propel both the Native non-profit sector and philanthropy to best serve Indian Country.”

From education, governance, and helping to build a sustainable economy in Indian Country, Carly sees ample opportunities to affect change by empowering and equipping Native communities with the experiences and tools they need to prosper.

“I strongly believe that Indigenous wisdom and ways of being are integral to the vitality of our communities and to this planet. We were all born as whole beings, gifted with numerous strengths and skillsets to contribute to this world. Our experiences and opportunities shape how effectively we can make these contributions. Philanthropy can play an important role in supporting our communities to develop and nurture our individual and collective strengths in ways that will lead to a better future for us all,” she said.

Carly holds a Juris Doctorate degree cum laude from the University of Minnesota Law School, a Bachelor of Arts degree summa cum laude from the University of Minnesota, and an Associate of Arts degree from Minneapolis Community and Technical College.

Carly lives in Minneapolis with her husband Jay and their young son Quill.

About the Native Ways Federation – Native Ways Federation, Inc.’s (NWF) mission is three-fold: (1) To strengthen the circle of giving by uniting Native organizations to raise awareness and needed funds for the communities we serve; (2) To better serve Native communities by becoming more effective Native nonprofit organizations; and (3) To ensure that non-profit organizations working on behalf of Native communities observe the highest levels of ethical standards and fiscal responsibility. NWF is unique in that it is the only federation in the country directly serving Native nonprofits that assist Native peoples and communities in Indian country. NWF is based on the idea that the challenges facing Indian Country demand that nonprofits serving this population hold themselves accountable to the highest standards. For more information about the Native Ways Federation, please visit http://www.nativeways.org/

Photo: Carly Bad Bull Heart, Executive Director, Native Ways Federation, Inc.

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Airport Restaurateurs, Retailers and Small/Minority Businesses Urge Airports and Congress to Provide Financial Relief Industry Experiencing Unprecedented Business Impact

AMAC and ARRA logos

WASHINGTON, DC (March 18, 2020) – The Airport Restaurant & Retail Association (ARRA) and Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) urged airports and Congress to quickly pass financial relief for airport restaurateurs and retailers given the unprecedented business impact caused by the spread of the Coronavirus and resultant COVID-19 pandemic.

Members of both organizations, which include restaurants, gift shops and retail stores, have been seriously impacted given the rapid decline in airline bookings and passenger counts which are falling at unprecedented rates. Further, several state and municipalities are closing restaurants, including at airports, to help contain the spread of COVID-19. All stakeholders in the industry—airlines, airports, airport retailers and restaurateurs, and other related companies—are financially suffering.

The associations represent a $10 billion industry made up of firms of varying sizes, including many small and local businesses which contribute $2.5 billion to airport revenue streams. Together these businesses employ more than 125,000 workers in U.S. airports. The restaurants and retail shops are a vital part of the airline passenger’s travel experience, and a major revenue source on which airports depend for their operations, development and bond financing.

John Clark, Chair of AMAC commented, “Our members are suffering tremendous sales losses exceeding 50% and in some cases as high as 90%. The industry is facing a major financial crisis. Many businesses, including those classified as small and/or disadvantaged, may not be able to continue operations.”

Restaurateurs and retailers in the aviation sector are contracted by airports, airlines and third-party developers to provide passengers a full range of food, beverage and retail services. Pat Murray, Chair of the ARRA explained, “our members’ ability to retain and pay employees, as well as pay rents to airports, has been seriously jeopardized. Some of our members will likely be unable to meet our debt obligations and will be forced out of business if quick action is not taken to provide relief.”

The two associations urged airports to engage with their members quickly and adopt mitigating actions to save the businesses:

• Waive rent, other fees and the imposition of penalties for at least six (6) months with the opportunity to extend depending on the extent and impact of the crisis.
• Suspend and defer concessionaires’ capital investment requirements.
• Provide operational flexibility including, but not limited to adjustments to operating hours, locations and menus/product selections as well as selective temporary closing of stores and restaurants in order to better align with passenger volumes and flows and reduce the impact on employees.

ARRA and AMAC strongly support the airports’ request for emergency financial assistance and flexibility to help sustain operations, preserve jobs and bonds, including assistance and flexibility for concessionaires during this critical time. ARRA and AMAC urged Congress and the Administration to also provide financial relief and assistance to airport concessionaires to ensure business continuity, secure loans and make debt service payments. Specific measures ARRA and AMAC urge Congress and the Administration to act upon are:

• Provide grants and low-interest or interest-free loans to concessionaires to allow concessionaires to cover operating expenses.
• Provide loan guarantees to concessionaires to assure their ability to continue making debt service payments and secure loans for their ongoing capital investment requirements.

About Airport Restaurant & Retail Association
The Association’s mission is to work collaboratively with aviation-industry trade associations and the airport community on matters of policy decision-making with a collective impact on restaurant/retail members. As members of the airport communities we serve, ARRA members have an expertise and understanding of best practices in the complex aviation restaurant and retail operational environment. Our knowledge can ultimately deliver powerful solutions of benefit to our airport partners.

About the Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC)
The Airport Minority Advisory Council (AMAC) is the only national, non-profit trade association dedicated to advance the full participation of minorities and women in employment and contracting opportunities throughout the aviation and aerospace industries. Since 1984, AMAC has been at the forefront of nearly every national policy initiative impacting the participation of disadvantaged businesses in airport contracting. AMAC works consistently with Congress, the Federal government, aviation trade associations and others as a resource for information, education and guidance on business and employment matters. For more information, visit amac-org.com.

Health Care HR Week 2020 Sponsored by ASHHRA

Health Care Human Resources Week will be observed March 16-20, 2020. It is designated to recognize human resources professionals in health care organizations across the nation for their important role across the continuum of care.

For more information visit ashhra.org/HCHRWeek.

2020 Marks the 13ᵗʰ Anniversary of the Women Presidents’ Organization 50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned/Led Companies™ Sponsored by American Express

50 Fastest Growing Women-Owned/Led Companiesᵀᴹ Deadline Extended to March 1, 2020!

To be eligible, companies must be:

• Privately owned

• Women-owned/led

• The business must have generated at least $500,000 (USD) in 2015 revenue (and every subsequent year)

• Revenues must be converted to USD

Applicants are not required to be WPO members.

International businesses are encouraged to apply.

Click HERE to apply!

EBCI represents at AISES Annual Conference

MILWAUKEE, Wisc. – The recent 42nd American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) Annual Conference in Milwaukee, Wisc. included the following representatives from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI): Yona Wade, Tracy Monteith, and Katherine Jacobs and representation from the New Kituwah Academy, Jessica Metz. The AISES National Conference has become the premier event for Native American Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) professionals and students and attracts over 2,000 attendees from across the country.

During the Annual Conference, the Winds of Change magazine featured the EBCI on their annual list of “25 Native STEM Enterprises To Watch” for the work they are doing to support cultural preservation, language revitalization, and the contributions they continue to make toward programs supporting STEM within the EBCI community.

Principal Chief Richard G. Sneed makes one sentiment clear, “We are proud of all our STEM-related employees.”

In a world where technology continues to expand connections to ancestors, traditions and ceremonies need to stand stronger than ever, and the EBCI is bringing STEM technology to that challenge according to Sneed, “Preserving our culture and traditions is paramount to the future success of our Tribe.”

New Kituwah Academy Science teacher, Jessica Metz, received the distinguished honor of becoming a lifelong member known as Sequoyah Fellows. AISES Sequoyah Fellows are recognized for their commitment to “mission in STEM and to the American Indian community.”

AISES event
Shown at the recent AISES National Conference in Milwaukee, Wisc. are, left to right, Katherine Jacobs, an EBCI tribal member who serves as the Region 3 Representative for the AISES; Yona Wade, an EBCI tribal member who received the AISES Indigenous Excellence Award; and Alicia Mitchell, a Cherokee Nation citizen, who is the newly positioned senior development officer for AISES. (Photo courtesy of AISES)

Alicia Mitchell, a Cherokee Nation citizen, who is the newly positioned senior development officer for AISES, states, “Jessica’s passion for the future of the EBCI students through her instruction is astounding, she continues to set the bar and is a role model for other tribal nations as her students are producing science projects in the Cherokee Language. It was truly a privilege and honor to gift her with a Sequoyah medal.”

Katherine Jacobs, an EBCI tribal member and the daughter of Brad Jacobs and Mitchell, has been elected to serve as the Region 3 Representative for the AISES. She is currently studying finance at Arizona State University in Tempe, Ariz. and will be graduating May 11. This appointment gives Jacobs the opportunity to be an ambassador for the EBCI and collaborate with other native students on a national level.

Jacobs attended as the AISES Region 3 Representative saying, “As the Region 3 Student Representative, it is my duty to lead the planning and execution of the regional conference, notify each chapter of crucial information and serve as a liaison for the chapters and Board of Directors. The AISES community is a true family network that provides countless opportunities and support to indigenous people in STEM fields. I aspire to use my networks from AISES to better serve the EBCI community while stimulating our youth to do the same with the aid of education and organizations such as AISES.”

The Conference provided social and professional networking, mentoring, research, and nationally recognized speakers. It also offers thought-provoking discussions on important current STEM issues such as diversity and inclusion in STEM related fields, as well as excellent career resources and traditional cultural activities.

During the Traditional Honors Banquet, the EBCI was named as the recipient of the Tribal Partner Service Award for their gracious contributions and financially investing in the 2019 AISES Leadership Summit.

Mitchell includes, “The EBCI community really came through on this event providing support, professional tribal members conducting leadership sessions and being incredible hosts to our guests.”

The inaugural Indigenous Excellence Award that acknowledges individuals who have done substantial work to advance program and opportunities for Indigenous students and professionals in STEM education and careers was awarded to Yona Wade, an EBCI tribal member who has dedicated 10 years to the development of native youth and supporting the educators at Cherokee Central Schools.

“It is an absolute pleasure to serve my Cherokee people,” said Wade. “I have yet to have a day where I didn’t want to go to work. Passion is what drives me.Passion for my work and passion for my people.”

As Mitchell has transitioned into the role of a staff member for AISES, her prior service did not go unrecognized at the Traditional Honors Banquet. Her years of service and contributions of supporting STEM across Indian Country and within the EBCI community was instrumental in the development of the EBCI being one of the first two tribal chapters, the placement of three EBCI student representatives, and bringing culturally based curriculum programming into the Cherokee Central School system through grants funded by the Cherokee Preservation Foundation.

She is dedicated to this work and feels that her position at AISES allows her to pursue many of her passions including; working for Native people, promoting education, enhancing the tribal workforce, supporting economic development, promoting tribal sovereignty, and increasing diversity in organizations and institutions throughout North America.

The collaboration between the EBCI students and AISES strengthens as they received a grant for a project called, Strengthening Computer Science Curriculum for CCS, from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation. This funding provided students and faculty from Cherokee High School the opportunity to attend the 42nd Annual Conference. Cherokee Central Schools’ staff members, Scott Freeman, Robert Rosener, Ronda Denton, Layno Carla attended along with the following students: Howie Wallace, Brandon Wolfe, Dorian Reed, Toby Johns, Caedance Smith, Phoebe Rattler, Jaden Armachain, and Tehya Littlejohn. The students participated in the interactive STEM activities while the faculty attended training sessions. Attendance to the AISES Annual Conference was made possible through funding from the Cherokee Preservation Foundation and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Nominations are currently being accepted for all AISES Professional of the Year Awards who will be honored at the 2020 AISES National Conference on Oct. 15-17 in Spokane, Wash.

Completed online nomination packets are due May 15 at 11:59 p.m. MDT. Incomplete nomination packets will not be accepted. For more information see: https://forms.aises.org/2020-poy Want to know more about the AISES professional awards program? Contact Kellie Jewett-Fernandezkjfernandez@aises.org or (720) 758-9679.

– Alicia Mitchell, AISES senior development officer

Lumina Foundation Grants the American Indian College Fund $650K to Inform College Affordability, Tribal College Credentialing and Sustainability

To better understand the factors limiting Native Americans’ access and success in higher education, Lumina Foundation has granted the American Indian College Fund $650,000 for a two-part, 30-month project.

The first part will determine how affordability of higher education factors into college degree attainment for Native students and how affordability practices impact the long-term sustainability of tribal colleges and universities. The second part will frame how tribal colleges and universities determine high quality credentials and implement teaching and learning practices that contribute to attainment. Currently research identifies affordability as a central cause of college student attrition, however, no research to date has demonstrated the impact of college affordability on the low rates of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) student college completion. Tribal colleges and universities (TCUs), tribally chartered higher education institutions located on or near Indian reservations, enroll 11% of AIAN students (approximately 15,000) seeking a college degree.

The American Indian College Fund (the College Fund) will research whether and how access, affordability, and the rising cost of attending college, coupled with institutional structural challenges and high rates of poverty in American Indian and Alaska Native communities (26.8% compared to 14.6% of the overall population), influence the completion rates of AIAN students.

The College Fund will also research how TCUs’ absorption of the cost of education to ensure AIAN student access impacts their sustainability.

The research will be conducted in collaboration with the National Native Scholarship Providers Working Group (NNSPWG), comprised of the College Fund and three national Native scholarship-providing organizations: the American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES), the American Indian Graduate Center (AIGC), the Indigenous Education Incorporated (IEI), and the College Fund. The collaboration will provide the College Fund access to a large, representative sample of AIAN college students attending both tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) and predominantly white two- and four-year institutions to examine college affordability for AIAN of both TCU and mainstream AIAN college students, graduates, and students who did not complete college.

To understand better how TCUs develop credentialed programs and how these credentials impact student success while influencing their sustainability as higher education institutions, the College Fund will also survey a sample of TCUs while engaging in detailed implementation with five TCUs to examine how they create credential programs and determine program success and outcomes. Specifically, this aspect of the project will explore how TCUs utilize state longitudinal data systems to determine the value of their programs; whether TCUs engage state economic forecasting studies to inform credential offerings; how TCUs are involved in their tribal governments’ economic development processes to ensure correct credentials for future tribal employment; and how TCUs measure if their credential offerings are meeting the needs of students (future, current and former), local/state employers, tribal and state policies, and their own institutions.

This research is meant to further Lumina’s goal of 60% of Americans holding degrees, certificates, or other high-quality post-secondary credentials by the year 2025 by raising the college completion rates of AIAN students. In addition, this research will assist Lumina’s efforts in achieving the goal by providing necessary evidence of the barriers that hinder AIAN completion so that they may be removed, while ensuring AIAN students are on a guided academic pathway leading to a high-quality credential; robust institutional data tracks the progress of AIAN students along their education path in real time and identifies problems they face in meeting learning goals; and targeted academic, social, and financial supports get students back and track and keep them on a path to academic completion.

The College Fund will produce and publish resulting reports from the work.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided $7.72 million in scholarships to 3,900 American Indian students in 2018-19, with nearly 137,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $221 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance. For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit www.collegefund.org.

About Lumina Foundation—Lumina Foundation is an independent, private foundation in Indianapolis that is committed to making opportunities for learning beyond high school available to all. Lumina envisions a system that is easy to navigate, delivers fair results, and meets the nation’s need for talent through a broad range of credentials. The foundation’s goal is to prepare people for informed citizenship and for success in a global economy.

American Indian College Fund Promotes Emily White Hat to Vice President, Programs

Denver, Colo., September 24, 2019 — The American Indian College Fund has promoted Emily R. White Hat, J.D. to the position of Vice President, Programs. In her role as Vice President White Hat will support tribal colleges and universities to develop and implement projects and assists in capacity building to strengthen educational opportunities for Native students.

White Hat, who is a citizen of the Sicangu Lakota from the Aske Gluwipi Tiospaye and whose Lakota name is Nape Waste Win or “Good Hand Woman,” was born in Rosebud and grew up in St. Francis, South Dakota.

White Hat’s experience as a former firefighter, emergency medical Emily White Hattechnician, policy researcher, evaluator, and legal background have been vital to her work in program development and implementation, strategic planning, national outreach, qualitative research, writing, curriculum implementation, and evaluation with tribal nations and colleges using a capacity-building approach. She earned a J.D. and natural resources law certificate from the University of New Mexico School of Law. She also earned a bachelor’s degree in forestry with a concentration in fire science and a minor in rangeland ecology from Colorado State University, and an associate of arts degree in Lakota history and culture from Sinte Gleska University, a tribal university located on her home reservation.

In 2015, Emily was recognized by the National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development as one of the “Native American 40 Under 40” award recipients. Emily currently serves as a board member for the Thunder Valley Community Development Corporation in Porcupine, South Dakota, a Lakota organization focused on creating systemic change through regenerative community development.

About the American Indian College Fund—Founded in 1989, the American Indian College Fund has been the nation’s largest charity supporting Native higher education for 30 years. The College Fund believes “Education is the answer” and provided 5,896 scholarships last year totaling $7.65 million to American Indian students, with more than 131,000 scholarships and community support totaling over $200 million since its inception. The College Fund also supports a variety of academic and support programs at the nation’s 35 accredited tribal colleges and universities, which are located on or near Indian reservations, ensuring students have the tools to graduate and succeed in their careers. The College Fund consistently receives top ratings from independent charity evaluators and is one of the nation’s top 100 charities named to the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance.

For more information about the American Indian College Fund, please visit collegefund.org.

AISES Joins the US Census 2020 Urban Indian Leadership Circle in the State of Colorado

by Emerald Craig

Toya Census

The American Indian Science and Engineering Society (AISES) began in 1977 with a vision for the next seven generations of Native people to be successful, respected, influential, and contributing members of our vast and ever-changing global community. The success of Native people is not solely represented by one organization, group, or society, but through the support of each other, we see that success.

One partnership AISES will be profoundly engaging over the next year is with representatives from the State of Colorado and the U.S. Census 2020 because the Decennial Census is happening in April 2020. The success of the U.S. Census can mean many things for Indian country in addition to population counts. The U.S. Census data influences how congressional seats are allocated, how federal money is distributed for programs like healthcare, housing and education, and where businesses will plan and build new stores.

The U.S. Census hosted the first Urban Indian Leadership Circle in Colorado in May 2019 in Denver, Colorado. AISES Director of Marketing and Communication Montoya Whiteman joined close to 30 American Indian and Alaska Native leaders who were certified as tribal partners, and to begin AISES’ role in assisting in outreach and support in reaching a successful 2020 U.S. Census. In the upcoming months, you will start to see U.S. Census 2020 information on the AISES website, in the Winds of Change magazine, Paths to Opportunities newsletters, and more.

The Native American Rights Fund along with former Zia Tribal Chairman and Census Tribal Coordinator for 12 states, and 19 tribes, Amadeo Shije, are leading the effort in Indian country for the U.S. Census 2020 with the campaign “Natives Count.” By visiting census.narf.org, you too can join the effort in keeping Indian country successful whether it is being hired for a job such as a census taker, recruiting assistant, office staff, and supervisory staff. Additional resources on how you can volunteer are also available at census.narf.org/.

Join the Natives Count effort at census.narf.org and download the flyer to inform your community!

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